Tue06302015

News

LAH council approves  Page Mill Road expansion

LAH council approves Page Mill Road expansion


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
The Los Altos Hills City Council endorsed a plan to widen the congested Page Mill Road to six lanes between the Interstate 280 interchange and Foothill Expressway.

Infamously congested Page Mill Road should be widened to ...

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Schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools

Local muralist tells a story of young Los Altos at two schools


Eliza Ridgeway/Town Crier
Los Altos muralist Morgan Bricca, above, created a work at Covington School commissioned by the Class of 2015.

Just as school ended this year, new color bloomed on two Los Altos campuses – public art projects commissi...

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Community

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play

Los Altos girl out to 'squash' inequality: 10-year-old raises funds for female players with motto Equal pay for play


Courtesy of Lisa Bardin
Mika Bardin displays a certificate of participation she received at the 2015 U.S. Junior Squash Championships. Although Mika is not competing in the upcoming NetSuite Open Squash Championships, she is helping other female pl...

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Sports

Hurdling adversity

Hurdling adversity


courtesy of Nicole Goodwin
Ella Goodwin, hurdling, above, has come a long way since her early-childhood battle with leukemia.

While Nicole Goodwin is proud of daughter Ella’s athletic achievements, it’s not her skills on the soccer field...

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Comment

No confidence in civic center proposals: Editorial

Few Los Altos issues have become more convoluted than the development of the 18-acre Hillview civic center property. Most agree that the area, as currently configured, needs improvement. But nothing has happened in the nearly 10 years since serious d...

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Special Sections

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme

Star-spangled manor: Orange Avenue home boasts Americana theme


Megan V. WInslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Pinky Whelan’s Orange Avenue home features a patriotic theme, evident in her living room decor, her historical collections and displays and her welcoming entrance.

Let’s hear it for the red...

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Business

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month

Thai Silks shutters Los Altos store this month


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
After more than 50 years in business in downtown Los Altos, Thai Silks is closing up shop at 252 State St. by the end of the month. The store will continue to offer its inventory online and via phone.

A longtime downtown ...

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Books

People

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

ALAN FRAZIER KREMEN, MD, PHD

Alan Frazier Kremen, MD, PhD, aged 68, loving father & surgeon, of Stockton peacefully passed away on June 13th, 2015.

Born in Minneapolis on December 17, 1946, he received a BA from Stanford University, 1968, a PhD in Philosophy from the Univ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

'Town' closes down

'Town' closes down


Chris Peoples/Special to the Town Crier
Hope Cladwell (played by Krista Joy Serpa) and Bobby Strong (Lewis Rawlinson) get romantic during their duet in “Urinetown: The Musical.”

The Los Altos Stage Company production of “Urinetown: The Musical” ...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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Disagreement over document locks out BCS teachers from Blach

It looks like another year of discord between Bullis Charter School and the Los Altos School District.

            After district officials made it clear last week that charter school administrators would need to sign a Facilities Use Agreement (FUA) before gaining access to the shared facilities on Blach Intermediate School campus, tensions erupted. An FUA is similar to a lease, with stipulations outlining how the signee may use the space.

            Objecting to the district’s restrictions in the FUA, charter school officials refused to sign the document. The district responded by changing the locks on the new facilities at Blach, barring charter school teachers and staff from preparing for the school year, scheduled to begin Aug. 21.

New restrictions

            When the district extended its final facilities offer to the charter school in April, the district attached a draft FUA to the document. The district sent charter school officials an amended FUA July 19, with additions reflecting various aspects of the final offer.

            The district’s FUA limits the number of students allowed on both the Egan Junior High and Blach campuses on a daily basis, citing the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). District officials determined that Blach could house no more than 146 students charter school students each day and capped the Egan population at 496.

            Doug Smith, president of the district board of trustees, said the district’s FUA was not an attempt to throw a monkey wrench in the charter school’s operations.

            “CEQA is what keeps everybody good neighbors,” Smith said. “It is what ensures that a school site doesn’t create an unfair burden on everyone who lives in that community.”

            One of the additions to the July FUA draft requires charter school Superintendent Wanny Hersey to certify compliance to FUA restrictions in writing “under the penalty of perjury.”

            “Certifying the agreement shouldn’t be a hard thing to do – it’s just saying that you are following the terms,” Smith said.

            Another portion of the FUA proposes to limit the Blach facilities to fourth-through eighth-grade Bullis Charter School students.

            Smith said the district sought to bar younger grades from housing their program at Blach for safety reasons.

            “We’ve got seventh- and eighth-graders (on the Blach campus),” he said. “We are not set up at that facility for young children. There are state requirements for young children (gated fences, age-appropriate toilets, play structures). We did not duplicate all that expense – the district has to construct an offer that makes some sense.”

            Two other additions to the July FUA – a nearly 100 percent increase in pro-rata share costs ($208,000) and language that would prevent litigation over the final offer – were removed after district trustees re-evaluated their stance, Smith said.

Strained relations

            Although charter school officials received the district’s amended FUA July 19, Smith said they did not respond with changes to the document until July 31 – the day before Bullis Charter School administrators were slated to receive keys to the Blach campus.

            Smith and District Superintendent Jeff Baier were scheduled to present at an Aug. 6 charter school meeting the findings of the district’s Enrollment Task Force and emphasize the necessity of working together to pass a bond to secure additional campuses to accommodate student growth. With communications so strained, however, the two parties could not agree on a time or place to meet.

            A day before the meeting, the charter school noticed it as occurring 6 p.m. at Blach, while the district posted a closed session at the same time at Egan.

            Smith attended the beginning of the charter school’s meeting, held in the Blach gym, to address the board during the public comments session. Smith registered his disappointment that the two groups could not come to terms on the meeting, which he said was supposed to be a “first step.”

            “We have a short-term problem of being locked out,” countered Ken Moore, chairman of the Bullis Charter School board. “At the same time, you want us to help with a bond measure for the future. It’s hard for us to reconcile the two situations.”

            Charter school board members questioned the need for FUA, noting that there hasn’t been one in the past few years. Board member Janet Medlin said the charter school had requested a meeting to hammer out the 2013-2014 facilities agreement since April.

            Medlin deemed the FUA “not conducive to the air of cooperation.”

“Neither are the lawsuits,” Smith shot back.

            “You are going to seek bond support from Bullis Charter School families and yet you are telling those taxpayers ‘Vote for my bond’ while you are keeping facilities from my kids,” Medlin said.

            Charter school board member John Phelps characterized the district’s acts as “hostile” toward the charter school.

            “Why all the hostile acts and hostile words?” he asked. “When will that stop so that there is a sincere effort to solve this problem once and for all? Do you really want to walk out on 650 kids?”

Parking lot meeting

            Later that evening, a subset of district and charter school board members met in the Egan parking lot in an attempt to reach to an agreement, Smith and Phelps said.

            Smith said the two groups proposed a verbal agreement that the charter school would sign the FUA, followed by a public process in which the district would address charter school’s concerns.

            Phelps challenged Smith’s version of the exchange, claiming that the district got it wrong.

            “I think they are overstating what was a discussion in a parking lot that was initiated over a text,” Phelps said. “I’m concerned that this district is in such a rush to point a gun at the head of the charter school to get a signed agreement.”

            Phelps questioned whether the district’s terms were realistic, suggesting that another lawsuit would result if the charter school signed the agreement and subsequently violated the terms.

            “The FUA they are imposing unilaterally is attempting to interfere in the curriculum,” he said. “As far as I’m concerned, the terms the district is asking for are absurd. They know those things are illegal, and they know we will be in immediate breach of those terms. You can imagine where that will go.”

            Phelps said he has never been asked to sign a document first and talk about the issues surrounding it later.

            “Let’s sit down and discuss terms before we sign an agreement,” he said. “Let’s get teachers in class today.”

            It is unclear whether the board members from the district and the charter school have continued to communicate regarding the FUA.

Protesting the lockout

            The Blach lockout prompted protests from Bullis Charter School parents at the Los Altos School District offices Thursday.

            “Locking our teachers out is absolutely outrageous,” said parent Tanya Raschke. “We cannot stand by and watch LASD bully our teachers and students in order to push their own political agenda. The facilities belong to the taxpayers, not the district. They have no right to change the locks and refuse to give our teachers the keys.”

            More than 20 charter school parents proffered signs to express their outrage and frustration over the lockout.

            After two Bullis Charter School protesters met with Baier and Smith, demonstration organizer Martha McClatchie said she would meet with charter school board members to communicate her concerns. She added that both sides must sit down and resolve their problems.

            “We can continue to express our feelings to both boards that unless they sit down and talk together, nothing is going to happen,” McClatchie said.

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