Tue02092016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

City calls for speed-limit increases: Proposal suggests 5 mph boost on Los Altos road segments

NEWS Radar2 fmt1A proposal calling for speed-limit increases on 19 road segments in the city is headed to the Los Altos City Council for review Tuesday.

    The city announced the proposal last week, which calls for 5 mph speed increases on 18 of the 19 affected road segments, including portions of Fremont Avenue and Grant and Covington roads. One segment – a stretch of Grant – calls for a 10 mph increase. (See the chart on page 6 for a complete list of proposed speed-limit increases.)

     The proposal comes after city engineers conducted a traffic survey from October 2012 to January 2013 as part of a California Vehicle Code (CVC) requirement that local municipalities re-evaluate nonstatutory speed limits at intervals of five, seven and 10 years.

The study, according to Los Altos Transportation Project Manager Cedric Novenario, is necessary for another reason – radar speed enforcement by police.

Novenario noted that CVC regulations mandate that each municipality conduct a valid traffic study – and approve any speed-limit adjustments as a result of it – before law enforcement officials may use radar technology to enforce posted speeds.

If you were to get a ticket in any jurisdiction, you have the right to ask for the
engineering and traffic survey, which essentially proves the posted speed limits on the street,” said Novenario, who added that the council opted to reject speed-limit increases for most of the 40-plus road segments studied during the last survey in 2007. “Without this valid survey, a ticketed person (through radar enforcement) can go to court and get that ticket tossed if the study is out of date.”

Los Altos Police Chief Tuck Younis added that using radar technology is “the safest and most effective way to do enforcement.”

The 2012-2013 study, Novenario said, measured a random sampling of 100 motorists’ speeds along 23 road segments. Each segment’s speed limit, he said, is later determined by rounding to the nearest 5 mph increment of the 85th percentile speed – the top speed motorists can safely travel down a particular roadway.

A more conservative approach

Novenario said a California Manual for Uniform Traffic Control Devices regulation offers some flexibility to city engineers by proposing speed limits at a maximum of 5 mph under the 85th percentile speed. Engineers will typically take into consideration road conditions and other factors – such as the level of pedestrian and bicycle activity – before setting a limit, he added.

As an example, Novenario pointed to the study’s proposal for a 5 mph bump (from 30 to 35 mph) along El Monte Avenue – between Foothill Expressway and the city’s southern limit – despite measuring 85th percentile speeds of 42.5 mph (rounded down to 40 mph).

“Backing off 5 mph is kind of at the engineer’s discretion,” said Novenario, adding that he ultimately opted to move forward with a more conservative approach of 5 mph increases for the majority of roads in question. “You really have to know the area you’re dealing with first.”

Still, Novenario acknowledged that some residents might not react favorably to the proposed speed-limit increases.

“The most common concern is that if you raise the speed limit, drivers (violating the limit) are just going to push their speeds higher and higher,” he said.

With this in mind, Novenario was quick to point out that the city council ultimately has the final say in setting city speed limits as low as they want – and that’s where the quirk of the CVC comes into play. Without approving the proposed increases, he noted, police are limited to enforcing speeds through the “pace method” – which requires patrol officers to trail behind a violator to measure speed over a fixed distance.

“If the council doesn’t go with the recommended (speed-limit increases),” he said, “the police can’t enforce with radar.”

NEWS speedlimitchart

The city last week unveiled a proposal to increase speeds on 11 roads in Los Altos.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos