Sat02062016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Camp Galileo expands local offerings


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Summer Quest camper Eli Jarvis sands the steering wheel on his go-kart at Santa Rita School last month.

Camp Galileo, the longtime Los Altos summer camp provider, expanded its offerings this year to include incoming fifth- through eighth-graders in its Summer Quest program.

Summer Quest allows participants to pick a “major” and perform in-depth work in one topic during one-week sessions. Classes available in Los Altos include Video Game Design, Fashion Design, Go-Kart Builders, Chefology and Inventor’s Workshop.

“By fifth grade, we think kids have this ability to find their passion and go deep on something and experiment in one field, so we offer this wide range of options from the arts to the tech to the builders and makers,” said Jessica Ellis, lead curriculum designer for Camp Galileo programs.

Camp Galileo for younger students, a Los Altos mainstay for many years, combines art, science and outdoor activities.

Mentors and the small, team-oriented classes aim to inspire campers to pursue their passions, organizers said, creating “burgeoning visionaries” in the process.

In the Video Game Design class, students spend the week learning how to create a video game with challenges and levels. The Fashion Design class exposes students to the basics and introduces skills such as altering garments to match students’ unique styles. Students in the Go-Kart Builders class construct go-karts, customizing their vehicles based on their tastes and what they think would enhance their speed.

Kim Marcis, Los Altos camp director, said she really enjoys the quality of the curriculum.

“We develop innovators that can envision and create a better world,” she said. “So through our curriculum we are teaching a mindset, teaching a process to be creative and be visionary – basically have an idea and really go with it.”

Marcis added that the Summer Quest and Camp Galileo experiences allow students to learn differently.

“I have two kids, and when I think about what kind of values I want to instill in them, I want them to believe that their ideas are worthwhile and worth pursuing,” she said. “This type of thinking is not as encouraged in a classic classroom setting. That is why I think having this camp experience is so valuable.”

A recent tour of Summer Quest showed students engaged in variety of activities, from selecting steering wheels for their go-karts to altering clothing. Each class boasted instructors trained to help campers realize their personal visions and boost their decision-making skills.

Galileo Learning, an Oakland-based company that operates summer enrichment camps throughout the Bay Area, designs programs to emphasize a hands-on curriculum that promotes creativity, innovation and teamwork, according to organizers.

Using the Galileo Innovation Approach, camp organizers said, the programs teach children to innovate without fear of failing, building their creative confidence through a curriculum that complements school-year academics and “delivers all the fun” of summer camp. Offerings were developed in collaboration with the Chabot Space & Science Center, the de Young Museum, Klutz, The Tech Museum and the Charles M. Schulz Museum and Research Center.

For more information, visit galileo-learning.com.


Camp Galileo - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/ Los Altos Town Crier

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