Fri03062015

News

Council considers freezing First St. development

Council considers freezing First St. development


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
A pedestrian walks along First Street in downtown Los Altos last week. Future construction on the street could soon be barred by an emergency moratorium on development.

Further construction along First Street could...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Santa Rita students put on Kranky Kids Radio Show

Santa Rita students put on Kranky Kids Radio Show


Traci Newell/ Town Crier
Neighborhood volunteer Lishka DeVoss, center, introduces members of Santa Rita School’s Kranky Kids Radio Club to their interviewee last week. The students star in the Kranky Kids Radio Show, which airs Fridays on KZSU.
...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Music for Minors partners with Harvard to expand efforts

Music for Minors partners with Harvard to expand efforts


Palmer

When the thriving Music for Minors began to outgrow its capacity, the local nonprofit organization made new friends.

Beginning in late February, Music for Minors – a Town Crier Holiday Fund recipient – partnered with Harvard Business Sch...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Eagles make school history

Eagles make school history

Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Los Altos High School Eagles defeated Santa Clara High School Tuesday to advance to the Central Coast Section basketball finals Saturday.

The Eagles are headed where no Los Altos High boys basketball team has gone...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Dangerous streets: A Piece of My Mind

I’m driving along El Monte Avenue between Foothill Expressway and Springer Road at approximately 6 p.m. on a midwinter evening. In keeping with the “village feeling” of our town, there are no sidewalks and no streetlights.

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Lions, lambs and Cab Franc for March

Lions, lambs and Cab Franc for March


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
Oven fries, a slice of feta cheese and the bite of harissa mayonnaise make for a late-winter, early-spring dinner perfectly paired with Cabernet Franc.

I can’t help but wonder whether March will come in ...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Los Altos scientist named Inventor of the Year

Los Altos scientist named Inventor of the Year

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Robert Showen, above, the Silicon Valley Intellectual Property Lawyers Association’s Inventor of the Year, began researching his ShotSpotter technology in his Los Altos home. Sensors are placed around a city, below, and fou...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

French novel

French novel "Hunting and Gathering" offers character-driven suspense


Anna Gavalda is a well-known author in her native France, where she has published six books, most of which have met with considerable praise and commercial success. Her fourth novel, “Hunting and Gathering” (Riverhead Books, 2007), is filled ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

JACK JOSEPH CRANE

JACK JOSEPH CRANE

Long time Los Altos resident, Jack Joseph Crane, loving husband and devoted father of two children, passed away peacefully at the Terraces in Los Altos, Saturday, February 21, 2015. He was 95 years of age. Jack was born on June 22, 1919. He is prec...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new


Ramya Krishna/Special to the Town Crier
Seoul’s Cheonggyecheon public recreation space, above, features an elevated pedestrian bridge.

Seoul, South Korea, is a study in contrasts. Having grown quickly, the city is a mix of old and new.

Using...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

TheatreWorks jumps into ‘Lake’

TheatreWorks jumps into ‘Lake’


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Jason Bowen, from left, Adam Poss and Nilanjana Bose star in “The Lake Effect,” opening this weekend at the Lucie Stern Theatre in Palo Alto and running through March 29.

The TheatreWorks production ...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Is your thought life sabotaging your spiritual journey?

My computer started having problems – there seemed to be some sort of malware running in the background. At first it was just annoying, then it began to slow down my computer, interfering with its basic operations. What is it doing? Why can...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Local events serve up family fun

Local events serve up family fun


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Pecos Bill: A Tall Tale” is slated to open March 20 in Mountain View.

For families seeking a break from the daily routine, events abound this month and next in Los Alto...

Read more:

Loading...

Sweet dreams: Researchers explore the mysteries of sleep


Photo By:

It may be the least understood aspect of our human experience, but we all spend approximately one-third of our lives doing it. Without it, we are not only miserable, we can’t even live very long. We know we need it, but leading scientists who have devoted their lives to studying it don’t entirely understand its function.

Sleep is as important to our lives as eating and breathing. As the subject of scientific inquiry, it is just beginning to be understood. Fifty years ago, sleep was thought to be a simple process in which the brain got some rest. Now we know that sleep is a complex process that affects every aspect of our lives. More than 75 different sleep disorders have been identified and treated.

A new book explores the mysteries of sleep and the state of the science associated with slumber. “Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep” (W.W. Norton, 2012) by David K. Randall is hard to put down – you may want to forgo sleep to stay up all night reading.

Randall began exploring sleep after a personal sleepwalking experience. In “Dreamland,” he delves into a gamut of sleep-related issues. From dreams to sleeping with baby, snoring and crimes committed during sleep, Randall’s book proves an informative and entertaining read. This is not a how-to book that will help readers find answers to their sleep problems. Rather, it is popular science for those who want to understand what goes on when we close our eyes at night.

For those looking for that how-to book, Dr. Barry Krakow’s “Sound Sleep, Sound Mind: 7 Keys to Sleeping through the Night” (John Wiley & Sons, 2007) may be just the book for you. Krakow offers a seven-step program he named “Sleep Dynamic Therapy” (SDT). SDT addresses both mind and body issues that impact sleep and sleep quality.

“Sound Sleep, Sound Mind” includes a number of self-assessment tools and other questionnaires to measure problems and monitor progress. Krakow, a well-known sleep specialist, advocates drug-free solutions to sleep problems. A chapter on breathing issues associated with sleep, including allergies and apnea, is especially encouraging.

For readers who really want to dig in deep and read the same research as doctors, consider “Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine” (Elsevier Saunders, 2011). Specialists consider this fifth edition the gold standard for medical textbooks on the subject. One of its three editors is William C. Dement, M.D., a Stanford University professor often called the “Father of Sleep Medicine.” The other editors include renowned sleep researchers Meir Kryger, M.D., and Thomas Roth, M.D.

“Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine” provides a thorough review of current sleep research and clinical practice. According to the editors, when beginning work on the first edition 25 years ago, there was concern that there simply wasn’t enough information available for a book. More than two decades and 1,700 pages later, the explosive growth of sleep research is evident.

The Stanford University Sleep Center, which opened in 1970, was the first university-based sleep center and a pioneer in sleep research. Still one of the premier sleep laboratories in the world, the team at Stanford changed the way the world studied sleep and sleep disorders.

For more information on sleep and sleep disorders, visit Stanford Health Library’s website at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/neuro_sleep.html. The library carries two excellent videos featuring Stanford professor Rachel Manber, “Sleeping Well as We Age” and “Desperately Seeking Sleep,” also available online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/videolibrary/neuro.html.

Stanford Health Library has a new location. The branch formerly located at Stanford Shopping Center has relocated across the street to the newly renovated Hoover Pavilion at 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Other branches are located on the first floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos