Sun04192015

News

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Trader Joe's employees survey the damage after a car smashed through the glass doorway earlier today.

Trader Joe’s on Homestead Road is closed for the remainder of the day (April 17) after a car barreled through the glas...

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Schools

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pinewood School senior Georgia Lyon wrote and illustrated “How to Be Human: Diary of an Autistic Girl” in 2013.

Although first published under a pseudonym, Pinewood School student Georgia Lyon is stepping out to ...

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Community

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Volunteers and staff at the American Cancer Society's Discovery Shop in downtown Los Altos urge shoppers to "Be A Gem, Buy A Jewel" during the shop's special sale this Friday (April 17) and Saturday (April 18).

The sale is an opportunity to find Mot...

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Comment

Editorial: Let's assume not to presume

Two recent downtown Los Altos stories offer lessons in the drawbacks of jumping to conclusions.

A few months back, the Town Crier published an article on Ladera Autoworks on First Street closing its doors. That part was true, but the reason was not....

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Chrissy Huang, manager of Steinway Piano Gallery in Los Altos, showcases Steinway & Sons’ signature instruments. The gallery plans to host concerts with performers tickling the ivories.

A new downtown Los Altos bus...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

GREG STAHLER

GREG STAHLER

Greg Stahler died unexpecdly in his home in Belmont on March 26, 2015. (He was born in Mountain View on June 23, 1972). He will really be missed by three beautiful young children, Haley 7, Hannah 5, and Tyler 3, and his wife Kathryn. He will also b...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View


Courtesy of Lyn Flaim Healy/ Spotlight Moments Photography
Noelle Merino stars in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Those Darn Squirrels.”

The Peninsula Youth Theatre’s world premiere adaptation of “Those Darn Squirrels” is scheduled Friday and Saturda...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Green Pastures staff member JP Mercada, below right, helps Tommy, who lives at the group home, sort through papers and organize his room.

Tucked in the corner of a quiet residential cul-de-sac in Mountain View, Green Pastur...

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Sweet dreams: Researchers explore the mysteries of sleep


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It may be the least understood aspect of our human experience, but we all spend approximately one-third of our lives doing it. Without it, we are not only miserable, we can’t even live very long. We know we need it, but leading scientists who have devoted their lives to studying it don’t entirely understand its function.

Sleep is as important to our lives as eating and breathing. As the subject of scientific inquiry, it is just beginning to be understood. Fifty years ago, sleep was thought to be a simple process in which the brain got some rest. Now we know that sleep is a complex process that affects every aspect of our lives. More than 75 different sleep disorders have been identified and treated.

A new book explores the mysteries of sleep and the state of the science associated with slumber. “Dreamland: Adventures in the Strange Science of Sleep” (W.W. Norton, 2012) by David K. Randall is hard to put down – you may want to forgo sleep to stay up all night reading.

Randall began exploring sleep after a personal sleepwalking experience. In “Dreamland,” he delves into a gamut of sleep-related issues. From dreams to sleeping with baby, snoring and crimes committed during sleep, Randall’s book proves an informative and entertaining read. This is not a how-to book that will help readers find answers to their sleep problems. Rather, it is popular science for those who want to understand what goes on when we close our eyes at night.

For those looking for that how-to book, Dr. Barry Krakow’s “Sound Sleep, Sound Mind: 7 Keys to Sleeping through the Night” (John Wiley & Sons, 2007) may be just the book for you. Krakow offers a seven-step program he named “Sleep Dynamic Therapy” (SDT). SDT addresses both mind and body issues that impact sleep and sleep quality.

“Sound Sleep, Sound Mind” includes a number of self-assessment tools and other questionnaires to measure problems and monitor progress. Krakow, a well-known sleep specialist, advocates drug-free solutions to sleep problems. A chapter on breathing issues associated with sleep, including allergies and apnea, is especially encouraging.

For readers who really want to dig in deep and read the same research as doctors, consider “Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine” (Elsevier Saunders, 2011). Specialists consider this fifth edition the gold standard for medical textbooks on the subject. One of its three editors is William C. Dement, M.D., a Stanford University professor often called the “Father of Sleep Medicine.” The other editors include renowned sleep researchers Meir Kryger, M.D., and Thomas Roth, M.D.

“Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine” provides a thorough review of current sleep research and clinical practice. According to the editors, when beginning work on the first edition 25 years ago, there was concern that there simply wasn’t enough information available for a book. More than two decades and 1,700 pages later, the explosive growth of sleep research is evident.

The Stanford University Sleep Center, which opened in 1970, was the first university-based sleep center and a pioneer in sleep research. Still one of the premier sleep laboratories in the world, the team at Stanford changed the way the world studied sleep and sleep disorders.

For more information on sleep and sleep disorders, visit Stanford Health Library’s website at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/neuro_sleep.html. The library carries two excellent videos featuring Stanford professor Rachel Manber, “Sleeping Well as We Age” and “Desperately Seeking Sleep,” also available online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/videolibrary/neuro.html.

Stanford Health Library has a new location. The branch formerly located at Stanford Shopping Center has relocated across the street to the newly renovated Hoover Pavilion at 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Other branches are located on the first floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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