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News

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council earmarked $7,000 for the purchase of Chris Johanson’s artwork.

The city of Los Altos will contribute $7,000 toward the purchase of a $28,000 art installation featured in the San Francisco Museum...

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Schools

LASD students celebrate service learning

LASD students celebrate service learning


Courtesy of Sandra McGonagle
We Day, held March 26 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, exhorts students in the Los Altos School District to effect positive change.

More than 150 Los Altos School District student leaders joined 16,000 Bay Area students to ce...

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Community

Film career launches with Cannes screening

Film career launches with Cannes screening


Courtesy of Zachary Ready
Los Altos native Zachary Ready, front left, and co-director Andrew Cathey, right, celebrate their Campus MovieFest awards.

After learning the art of filmmaking as a child in the front yard of his family’s Los Altos home...

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Sports

Sports on the Side

Pathways Run/Walk slated May 10 in Hills

The 13th annual Pathways Run/Walk is scheduled 9 a.m. May 10 at Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. The course wends through Byrne Preserve and onto the Los Altos Hills Pathways sys...

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Comment

Now is the time to expand parking: Editorial

Just a few short years ago, vacancies dotted downtown Los Altos. Property owners had a hard time attracting businesses because there was a shortage of customers. That is no longer true. Now, the cry is: Where are my customers going to park?

The city...

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Special Sections

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability


Courtesy of Michael McTighe
Mary Clark Bartlett is founder and CEO of Los Altos-based Epicurean Group.

Labels such as “healthy,” “organic” and “green” are rarely used to describe the meals served in most corporate cafes in Silicon Valley. But on...

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Business

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Coldwell Banker recently recognized realtor Kim Copher, right, for her philanthropic efforts. Copher and colleague Alan Russell, left, volunteer at Reach Potential Movement, where they collect books for its Bookshelf in ...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthy

RotaCare honors local volunteer

RotaCare Bay Area honored Jim Cochran of the RotaCare Mountain View Free Medical Clinic with the Outstanding Clinic Volunteer Award April 10 for his commitment to RotaCare’s mission of providing free medical care to t...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

Western Ballet performs this weekend  at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills

Western Ballet performs this weekend at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills


Courtesy of Alexi Zubiria
Western Ballet’s “La Fille Mal Gardée” features Alison Share and Maykel Solas. The production runs Friday and Saturday at Foothill College

Western Ballet is slated to perform “La Fille Mal GardéeR...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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Best Friends Approach: The Terraces staff develops ‘knack’ for dementia care


Photo By: Colleen Ryan/Special to the Town Crier
Photo Colleen Ryan/Special To The Town Crier

Dementia-care expert David Troxel advises staff at The Terraces at Los Altos’ memory-support center, The Grove.

When The Terraces at Los Altos opens its new memory-support facility, The Grove, in July, staff will embrace residents with dementia with a philosophy that emphasizes socialization and sensory-stimulating activities.

Pioneered by author and dementia-care expert David Troxel, the “Best Friends Approach” underscores the importance of creating an empathetic, activity-rich environment. The Terraces’ parent company, the nonprofit American Baptist Homes of the West, hired Troxel as a long-term consultant to train and advise staff at The Grove.

Troxel spoke at a forum sponsored by The Terraces, “New Trends in Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care: The Best Friends Approach,” May 4 at Los Altos United Methodist Church. The presentation included a panel featuring local elder-care advocates Bonnie Bollwinkel, Dr. Ronda Macchello and Karen Duncan (see article, page 34).

Troxel’s book, “A Dignified Life: The Best Friends Approach to Alzheimer’s Care” (Health Professions Press, 2003), co-authored with Virginia Bell, offers both family and institutional caregivers strategies for improving communication, encouraging positive behavior and solving problems.

“There’s a lot we can do to lift people up and give quality of life, to engage the person (with dementia) ... and help them do their best,” he said.

What every person with dementia needs, Troxel said, is a “best friend, someone who has empathy and understanding and is supportive.”

Socialization is key

“Dementia,” an umbrella term for various brain disorders that impair cognitive function, is not an exact diagnosis, according to Troxel, who added that dementias have different flavors and personalities that require different medical approaches. Alzheimer’s disease, the No. 1 form of dementia, commonly manifests in memory loss, disorientation and changes in behavior.

“If I had a broken arm, you could see the cast,” he said. “But we can’t see a broken brain. So a lot of times our expectations are really out of whack.”

As caregivers for older adults diagnosed with dementia, Troxel noted, it’s important to realize that the patient doesn’t make decisions the way he or she used to and proves progressively less able to rationalize and reason.

“(Caregivers) can’t just stay the same or else we don’t get anywhere,” he said. “We have to change some of our approaches.”

While dementia medications are tolerated with mild side effects by most people, and Troxel supports their judicious use, he noted that they are akin to “jumping out of an airplane with a parachute – they slow you down, but you eventually hit the ground.”

“Socialization is the treatment for Alzheimer’s,” he said, adding that The Grove’s philosophy is that “hugs are better than drugs.”

Developing the ‘knack’

Troxel’s Best Friends Approach encourages caregivers and family members to ask themselves a question: “How can I come out at the end of this feeling good instead of feeling completely exhausted and bitter?”

To create a positive environment for dementia sufferers in memory-care programs or at home, Troxel recommended that caregivers work on the relationship, be supportive, figure out ways to understand patients’ needs and be there for them.

“What works for us, works for them – giving hugs, compliments and simple choices … things that we would want,” he said.

When training caregivers, Troxel highlights the importance of a “great old-fashioned word” – “knack.”

“It means the art of doing difficult things with ease or clever tricks and strategies – having the knack,” he said.

The “knack” requires interacting with humor, flexibility, patience and respect. Such an approach from caregivers and family members, he added, allows them to avoid becoming the “bad guy” and encourages them to let go of the little stuff and forgo arguing.

“In dementia care, we have to adjust,” he said. “We need to assess the situation and make a change.”

Troxel attributed many of the behavior problems Alzheimer’s patients exhibit to boredom, simply not having enough to do.

“I want to create a program that maybe someday I’ll be in,” he said. “I don’t think I want to play bingo every day. Why not take an online tour of the Louvre and look at the Mona Lisa?”

According to Troxel, elements of a quality dementia-care experience include purposeful chores, creative activities, animals, conversation, incorporating the life story, exercise, music, being outside, learning and growth, and laughter.

When Troxel trains staff, he role-plays with them, demonstrating how to give compliments to elevate people and make them feel good.

“Our goal at The Terraces is to know 100 things about every patient,” he said, whether it’s that they love the San Francisco Giants, sleep in their socks or once hit a hole-in-one. “When the staff knows a lot about them … it makes them feel safe, secure and valued – it makes them feel known. And everything goes better.” 

For more information on The Grove at The Terraces at Los Altos, visit www.theterracesatlosaltos.com/care_memory.php.

For more information on Troxel’s Best Friends Approach, visit bestfriendsapproach.com.

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