Wed07302014

News

"Brown is the new green," says local water district


Lina Broydo/Special to the Town Crier
Are downtown Los Altos flower pots getting too much water? The Santa Clara Valley Water District plans to hire “water cops” to discourage overwatering.

The Santa Clara Valley Water District is spending nearl...

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Schools

Foothill camps prepare local students for STEM careers

Foothill camps prepare local students for STEM careers


Photos Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Middle school students make robotic hands using 3-D printers during a STEM Summer Camp at Foothill College.

From designing roller coasters to developing biodegradable plastics, high school students received an i...

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Community

Local entrepreneur opens home to Afghan and Rwandan women

Local entrepreneur opens home to Afghan and Rwandan women


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Businesswomen Joan Mazimhaka of Rwanda, third from left, and Fakhria Ibrahimi of Afghanistan, in orange, traveled to the U.S. with a 26-woman delegation through the Peace Through Business program.

Employees scoop ice ...

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Comment

Moving on: The Rockey Road

Just over a month ago, we decided to put our house on the market. My husband and I had been tossing around the idea of moving back to the area where we grew up, which is only approximately 40 minutes from here. Of course, Los Altos is a great place t...

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Business

Halo heads to Los Altos: Blow-dry bar founder opens new First Street location Monday

Halo heads to Los Altos: Blow-dry bar founder opens new First Street location Monday


ElLie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
Armed with blow dryers, Halo founder Rosemary Camposano, left, and store manager Nikki Thomas prepare for the blow-dry bar’s grand opening on First Street Monday.

A blow-dry bar is set to open downtown Monday, and i...

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Books

"Frozen in Time" chronicles harrowing WWII rescue attempts


Many readers can’t resist a true-life adventure story, especially those that shine a spotlight on people who exhibit supreme courage in the face of adversity and end up surviving – or not – against the odds.

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People

DR. ALFRED HUGHES

Long time Los Altos resident, Dr. Alfred Hughes, died May 1st after a long illness. Dr. Hughes was born in 1927 in Maspeth, NY. He served in the US Army from 1945-6, attended Brooklyn Polytechnic University, then graduated from Reed College in Portla...

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Travel

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway


Courtesy of Ritz-Carlton
The Ritz-Carlton in Lake Tahoe offers fall getaway packages that include spa treatments and yoga classes.

Fall in North Lake Tahoe boasts crisp mornings and opportunities to spend quality time in the mountains. Specially ...

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Stepping Out

'Wizard' winds down at Bus Barn

'Wizard' winds down at Bus Barn


Town Crier file photo
Local actors rehearse a scene from “The Wizard of Oz.”

Los Altos Youth Theatre and Los Altos Stage Company’s collaborative production of “The Wizard of Oz” is slated to close Sunday at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

T...

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Spiritual Life

Stanford University appoints new dean for religious life

Stanford University appoints new dean for religious life


Shaw

Stanford University named the Very Rev. Dr. Jane Shaw, dean of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, its new dean for religious life.

Provost John Etchemendy announced Shaw’s appointment July 21, adding that she also will join the faculty in...

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Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

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Pasadena offers more than roses


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pasadena’s Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens boasts the scenic Japanese Garden.

Like many destinations in Southern California, Pasadena boasts some eccentricities, but the delights of its Old Town Historic District entertain and amuse visitors.

Old Town comes alive after dark with its fine-dining establishments and assortment of shops along Colorado Boulevard. That’s the same Colorado Boulevard that the Little Old Lady terrorized in the eponymous Beach Boys song.

Most people know Pasadena courtesy of the Tournament of Roses Parade, held annually on New Year’s Day. The tradition began in 1890 to draw attention to the city filled with roses – even on chilly Jan. 1.

But there’s more to the city than just roses.

What to do

• Vroman’s Bookstore, 695 E. Colorado Blvd. – the end of the main drag, has sold books since original proprietor Adam Vroman opened his doors in 1894. Vroman, who hailed from LaSalle, Ill., also sold photographic supplies. His passion for photography and his shots of the Wild West and Native Americans influenced Ansel Adams’ work.

The store carries an extensive selection of fine-writing tools and stationery as well.

If you visit, stock up on magazines you won’t find elsewhere. I spent $90 on everything from French Vogue to British photography publications.

• The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens, 1151 Oxford Road in nearby San Marino, are worth at least a day trip. Founded by Henry E. Huntington and his wife, Arabella, the grounds became a nonprofit institution in 1919.

Huntington’s backstory included an apprenticeship under his uncle in the Southern Pacific railroad business. He had four children with his first wife, and then, at the age of 60, he married his uncle’s widow, Arabella, a wealthy woman who loved collecting art. Together, they grew the collection visitors see today.

The library is currently closed for remodeling, but there’s so much else to see that you won’t miss it much. For future reference, though, the library’s rare-book collection includes a Gutenberg Bible and early editions of Shakespeare’s works. Scholars from around the world visit to do research.

The surrounding 207-acre gardens are divided into 12 themes: Children’s, Australian, Camellia, Japanese, Shakespeare, Chinese, Subtropical, Desert, Rose, Herb, Palm and Lily Pond. There’s also a conservatory with orchids and jungle flowers.

Despite the hot day, we toured the Desert gardens, full of cacti from several different lands, and the humid conservatory of flowers. An exhibit of orchids mesmerized us. The Children’s Garden, with its sparkly cacti dotting the fences and arching gates, delighted youngsters going in and out.

We also entered the museum to browse the Huntington’s art collection, which includes Thomas Gainsborough’s “The Blue Boy,” Mary Cassatt’s “Breakfast in Bed” and Frederic Remington’s bronze sculpture “Bronco Buster.”

Summer hours are 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily, except Tuesdays. Admission is $20-$23 adults, $15-$18 seniors, $12-$13 students, $8 youth and free for children under 5. Parking is free.

For more information, visit www.huntington.org.

Where to stay

Check into the Courtyard Los Angeles Pasadena/Old Town Marriott, 180 N. Fair Oaks Ave., downtown for a family-friendly stay. Valet parking is expensive at $22 daily, but street parking is tough to find. Rooms are comfortable – ours had a king bed and sofa, a refrigerator to store snacks, plenty of drawer and closet space and a large bathroom. Outdoor amenities include a pool and whirlpool.

Rates start at $179 for a king, not including breakfast. Groupon offers discounts.

For reservations, call (888) 236-2427.

Where to eat

• For a hearty first meal of the day, I recommend the Zagat-rated Russell’s cafe, 30 N. Fair Oaks Ave. Just take a left turn after exiting the front door of the Marriott and walk two blocks or so.

The decor is rich, with heavy crystal chandeliers and Modigliani and Van Gogh prints on the walls.

I tried the cheese omelet and my companion had corned-beef hash. Portions were large and not greasy. It’s definitely a good breakfast stop, with moderate prices.

• We enjoyed a late dinner at Louise’s Trattoria, 2 E. Colorado Blvd., serving traditional handmade Italian fare.

• We followed dinner with a nightcap at The Melting Pot fondue restaurant and bar, 88 W. Colorado Blvd. The Melting Pot serves fondue on electric plates built into the bar, or you can eat at a booth. Dessert fondues start at $7.95.

For more information, visit oldpasadena.org.

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