Thu07022015

News

Effective today, library cards free again in Los Altos

Both Los Altos libraries should see a spike in use soon. After the elimination of an $80 annual card fee that had been in place since 2011, nonresidents will receive free library cards at local libraries, effective today.

Residents of Mountain View ...

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Schools

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline


Courtesy of Corinne Finegan Machatzke
Fifth- graders at Almond School launched the boats they designed and built at Shoreline Lake last month.

Almond School fifth-graders boarded their handmade boats at Shoreline Lake in Mountain View last month to...

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Community

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'


Courtesy of Charles Alley
Charles Alley’s filmmaking company may be based in Mountain View, but he knows all about “The Streets of San Francisco.” He’s rebooting the 1970s TV classic.

When people look for the next hit TV show, they often assume ...

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Sports

Enjoying the moment


Courtesy of Dick D’OlivA
Former Golden State Warriors trainer Dick D’Oliva, from left, wife Vi, former Warriors assistant coach Joe Roberts and wife Celia ride on a cable car in the victory parade.

Dick D’Oliva almost couldn’...

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Comment

The death knell of suburbia: A Piece of My Mind

The orchards are gone. The single-story ranch house is seen as a waste of valuable land and air space. An eight-lane freeway thunders past the bridle paths in Los Altos Hills. But nothing has signaled the death of suburbia more strongly than the ann...

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Special Sections

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors


courtesy of Ford
The 2015 Lincoln MKC doesn’t overwhelm as far as overall performance goes, but it does offer comfortable ride quality.

Of all the auto companies with headquarters in the United States, only Ford managed to weather the great re...

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Business

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS


Courtesy of Green Charge
Officials from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District celebrate the installation of electric-vehicle charging stations at Los Altos High last week.

The Mountain View Los Alto...

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Books

People

HILDA CLAIRE FENTON

Hilda Claire Fenton, beloved wife and mom to 9, grandmother to 30 and great grandmother to 22, passed away June 20 following a long illness. She was 90.

Hilda was born Sept. 28, 1924, to Lois and Gus Farley then of Logan, W. Va. While she was still ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

Cast carries 'Arcadia'

Cast carries 'Arcadia'


Courtesy of Pear Avenue Theatre
“Arcadia” stars Monica Ammerman and Robert Sean Campbell.

The intimate setting of Mountain View’s Pear Avenue Theatre proves the perfect place to stage “Arcadia,” allowing audience members to feel as though they a...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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A taste of the past: Museum's "Fandango" brings Los Altos back to its rancho roots


Photo By: Niuniu Teo / Town Crier
Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s books on local food history inspired the menu for this weekend’s “Fandango” fundraiser at the Los Altos History Museum.

Californians don’t look back often.

Silicon Valley is famous for its thriving start-up culture, technological innovation and progressive thinking – not for ruminating on its historical roots.

Two centuries ago, ranchos covered California’s sprawling, fertile land. Today, it is difficult to recognize the remnants of rancho culture in Los Altos’ paved streets and groomed lawns. But the land that now sits beneath the glass and steel buildings of Arastradero Road once anchored Californian ranchos. Two large land grants from California’s pastoral era covered what is now Los Altos Hills – Rancho La Purisima Concepcion and Rancho San Antonio.

Their history is scheduled to come back to life for a night of music, food and dance 5-9 p.m. Sunday at “Fandango! An Evening in Old California,” a fundraiser at the Los Altos History Museum, 51 S. San Antonio Road.

In addition to feasting on dishes of the area’s agricultural past, participants are encouraged to kit-out in period costume, turning to historical landowners like Juana Briones and Juan Prado Mesa for inspiration.

The History Museum hosts a themed benefit every year – previous themes include a Hawaiian luau and a German Oktoberfest. This year’s theme is based on the history of Los Altos’ own community.

“We’re especially happy about this (event) because it ties to the museum and what the museum is about,” said event co-organizer Diane Claypool.

Claypool’s menu, currently being taste-tested before making its grand debut at the event, includes barbecued beef, grilled vegetables, tortillas and wedding cookies.

The “Fandango” menu draws on recipes from Los Altos resident Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s cookbook, “California Rancho Cooking” (Olive Press, 1983). McMahan plans to attend the event with her husband.

“It was great to find out that they were going to re-create a fandango in Los Altos, because that’s the biggest celebration,” McMahan said. “A fandango is like pulling out all the stops.”

Memories of rancho life

McMahan’s book mixes personal memoir with cookbook, recounting family meals at Los Tularcitos, their 4,000-acre rancho, as well as traditional recipes. As illustrated in her book, the food-making process and the meals were central components of “Californio” tradition and culture. Recipes were passed along, from mothers to daughters, grandmothers to granddaughters, in a predominantly oral tradition. McMahan’s book is a rare documentation of rancho dining and food culture.

When McMahan interviewed other rancho families about their traditional food, she often received as many as 10 different versions of one recipe.

“Each family adds its own little style,” she said. “It was all by word-of-mouth, and they didn’t write everything down. I found myself re-creating a lot of the stuff they remembered, just from memories.”

Before she settled in Los Altos, McMahan lived with her family on their rancho, in what is today central and northern Milpitas. The rancho was granted to Jose Loreto Higuera, McMahan’s great-great grandfather, in 1821. Members of the Higuera family lived on the ranch for 150 years. Then, when she was approximately 5 years old, the family lost the ranch.

“Ranchos are usually lost because, for (the Californios), the land was endless, so they would sell parts of the land off to get money,” McMahan said. “So they finally sold off too much. It was a family argument, and the rancho was lost, as most of them were.”

An eighth-generation Californian, McMahan hails from a family of culinary aficionados. Despite the loss of her family’s rancho, their recipes continue to make their way down the generations.

“We lost the rancho but kept the food,” she said with a laugh.

The Los Tularcitos adobe is now part of a city park. In “California Rancho Cooking,” McMahan describes a quiet pathway of olive trees – a remnant of what was once paradise for the Californios.

“Long before the turn of the twentieth century, the great days of the California rancho had ended,” she writes. “And we have taken our children into the Lane, the long grove of olive trees planted in 1830, quieted them as we stood on the mulch of twenty years’ carpet of leaves, and told them to listen, as Grandpa told us. And if you listen, there is more than the breeze and the distant sound of a freeway.”

The Californio in us

According to Laura Bajuk, executive director of the Los Altos History Museum, the “Fandango” event aligns with the museum’s new focus on exploring its “impact on the community.”

“Recently, we re-evaluated our mission statement,” she said. “We believe that history inspires imagination and creativity. Our old mission statement was more about collecting and preserving – it was pretty dull.”

The Los Altos History Museum now focuses on its impact on the community it serves – thus, the purpose behind this year’s Fandango is partly to re-familiarize Los Altos area residents with their forgotten heritage.

“We’re trying to teach people about a history of a time period a lot of people don’t really understand,” Bajuk said. “Unless they grew up here, nobody learned about that time period. And a lot of people who are here didn’t grow up here.”

Although few physical traces remain of the once-flourishing ranchos, the legacy of the Californios is sifted, often unrecognized, into the names of local streets, the ingredients in food and the ways the community comes together.

“I really think (rancho culture is) part of our whole California barbecue outdoor dining lifestyle,” McMahan said. “It’s also in the kind of food we like – for example, we all love olive oil, and that’s about as linked to our past as you can get.”

Tickets for the “Fandango” event are $95 members, $115 nonmembers and $40 youth.

For tickets and more information, call Aja Sorensen at 948-9427, ext. 14, or visit www.losaltoshistory.org.

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