Fri05222015

News

Hilltop robbery suspects implicated in crimes across Bay Area

Hilltop robbery suspects implicated in crimes across Bay Area

The three Oakland men arrested in connection to the May 11 home invasion robbery of a Hilltop Drive home are under investigation for numerous additional crimes committed across the San Francisco Bay area, the Santa Clara County Sheriff's Office revea...

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Schools

Preschool matriarch steps down

Preschool matriarch steps down


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Children’s Center Preschool Director Non Mead sits beside her granddaughter, Greta Germack, during Greta’s birthday celebration.

Non Mead is the quintessential grandmother. Wise and warm, she ties shoelaces with ...

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Community

No 'Love' for Facebook

No 'Love' for Facebook


COurtesy of TRU Love
Tru Love sent multiple messages to Facebook – and made calls to the media – before the company unlocked her account.

Tru Love’s name may be unusual, but she comes by it naturally.

If only Facebook saw it that way.

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Sports

Semi sweep

Semi sweep


Town Crier file photo
St. Francis High’s Steve Dinneen, rising up for the kill, posted 15 kills in Saturday’s CCS semifinal sweep of rival Bellarmine.

There was no letup in the Lancers. Although the St. Francis High boys volleyball team ...

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Comment

Statute of limitations: Haugh About That?

“I can’t believe he’d do this to me,” I cried hysterically. “After all we meant to each other.” Curling into a ball, torrential teenage tears melted my mascara as my entire world came crashing to an obliterated end...

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Special Sections

Cancer survivors march toward strength, hope via Relay For Life

Cancer survivors march toward strength, hope via Relay For Life


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Cancer survivors Eileen Chun, left, and Marilyn Labetich build strength at Curves of Los Altos.

Two local women took steps toward cancer recovery by caring for themselves and celebrating alongside each other.

Eileen Chun and...

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Business

Repeat business: Répéter consignment celebrates 10 years on State Street

Repeat business: Répéter consignment celebrates 10 years on State Street


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Kellee Breaux owns Répéter, the State Street women’s consignment boutique that celebrates a decade in business Saturday.

Kellee Breaux’s life is a triangle: The 36-year-old lives in Newark, teaches full time a...

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Books

People

EDITH MAY COOPER

EDITH MAY COOPER

September 20, 1908 – April 7, 2015

Edith Cooper died peacefully in her sleep on April 7th in Los Altos, California, at the age of 106, where she had been a resident for over 30 years.

She was predeceased by Frank, her husband and her 3 brothers B...

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Travel

Flying south for the winter: Antarctica trips are not just for the birds

Flying south for the winter: Antarctica trips are not just for the birds


Photos Courtesy of Dave Hadden
Los Altos residents Dave and Joan Hadden watched the scenery from the large boat and a smaller Zodiac.

Standing on the beach with hundreds of thousands of penguins is “the experience of a lifetime,” accord...

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Stepping Out

Bye bye 'Birds'

Bye bye 'Birds'


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
“Birds of a Feather” stars Troy Johnson and Diane Tasca.

Pear Avenue Theatre’s world premiere of “Birds of a Feather” is set to run through Sunday in Mountain View.

The play is the third chapter in local pla...

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Spiritual Life

Mercifully in His grip: Exploring our true position in Christ

I recently read a wonderful analogy about our true position in Christ. It was shockingly contrary to the messages impressed upon me in church, but deeply rooted in the Bible. The analogy is that of child and a parent. If you have ever taken a small ...

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Magazine

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon

Practice prudent pruning: Maintaining manzanita, ceanothus and toyon


tanya kucak/Special to the Town Crier
Shrub manzanitas are known for their sinuous mahogany trunks and branches. If the foliage hides the bark, prune selectively to open the center so that the bark is visible year-round. This Montara manzanita is ...

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Inside Mountain View

Civility Roundtable opens discussion on race, policing

With racially charged unrest shaking places like Ferguson, Mo., New York City and Baltimore, the Mountain View Human Relations Commission posed a question: “How can we prevent Ferguson from happening in Mountain View?”

Nearly 150 residen...

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A taste of the past: Museum's "Fandango" brings Los Altos back to its rancho roots


Photo By: Niuniu Teo / Town Crier
Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s books on local food history inspired the menu for this weekend’s “Fandango” fundraiser at the Los Altos History Museum.

Californians don’t look back often.

Silicon Valley is famous for its thriving start-up culture, technological innovation and progressive thinking – not for ruminating on its historical roots.

Two centuries ago, ranchos covered California’s sprawling, fertile land. Today, it is difficult to recognize the remnants of rancho culture in Los Altos’ paved streets and groomed lawns. But the land that now sits beneath the glass and steel buildings of Arastradero Road once anchored Californian ranchos. Two large land grants from California’s pastoral era covered what is now Los Altos Hills – Rancho La Purisima Concepcion and Rancho San Antonio.

Their history is scheduled to come back to life for a night of music, food and dance 5-9 p.m. Sunday at “Fandango! An Evening in Old California,” a fundraiser at the Los Altos History Museum, 51 S. San Antonio Road.

In addition to feasting on dishes of the area’s agricultural past, participants are encouraged to kit-out in period costume, turning to historical landowners like Juana Briones and Juan Prado Mesa for inspiration.

The History Museum hosts a themed benefit every year – previous themes include a Hawaiian luau and a German Oktoberfest. This year’s theme is based on the history of Los Altos’ own community.

“We’re especially happy about this (event) because it ties to the museum and what the museum is about,” said event co-organizer Diane Claypool.

Claypool’s menu, currently being taste-tested before making its grand debut at the event, includes barbecued beef, grilled vegetables, tortillas and wedding cookies.

The “Fandango” menu draws on recipes from Los Altos resident Jacqueline Higuera McMahan’s cookbook, “California Rancho Cooking” (Olive Press, 1983). McMahan plans to attend the event with her husband.

“It was great to find out that they were going to re-create a fandango in Los Altos, because that’s the biggest celebration,” McMahan said. “A fandango is like pulling out all the stops.”

Memories of rancho life

McMahan’s book mixes personal memoir with cookbook, recounting family meals at Los Tularcitos, their 4,000-acre rancho, as well as traditional recipes. As illustrated in her book, the food-making process and the meals were central components of “Californio” tradition and culture. Recipes were passed along, from mothers to daughters, grandmothers to granddaughters, in a predominantly oral tradition. McMahan’s book is a rare documentation of rancho dining and food culture.

When McMahan interviewed other rancho families about their traditional food, she often received as many as 10 different versions of one recipe.

“Each family adds its own little style,” she said. “It was all by word-of-mouth, and they didn’t write everything down. I found myself re-creating a lot of the stuff they remembered, just from memories.”

Before she settled in Los Altos, McMahan lived with her family on their rancho, in what is today central and northern Milpitas. The rancho was granted to Jose Loreto Higuera, McMahan’s great-great grandfather, in 1821. Members of the Higuera family lived on the ranch for 150 years. Then, when she was approximately 5 years old, the family lost the ranch.

“Ranchos are usually lost because, for (the Californios), the land was endless, so they would sell parts of the land off to get money,” McMahan said. “So they finally sold off too much. It was a family argument, and the rancho was lost, as most of them were.”

An eighth-generation Californian, McMahan hails from a family of culinary aficionados. Despite the loss of her family’s rancho, their recipes continue to make their way down the generations.

“We lost the rancho but kept the food,” she said with a laugh.

The Los Tularcitos adobe is now part of a city park. In “California Rancho Cooking,” McMahan describes a quiet pathway of olive trees – a remnant of what was once paradise for the Californios.

“Long before the turn of the twentieth century, the great days of the California rancho had ended,” she writes. “And we have taken our children into the Lane, the long grove of olive trees planted in 1830, quieted them as we stood on the mulch of twenty years’ carpet of leaves, and told them to listen, as Grandpa told us. And if you listen, there is more than the breeze and the distant sound of a freeway.”

The Californio in us

According to Laura Bajuk, executive director of the Los Altos History Museum, the “Fandango” event aligns with the museum’s new focus on exploring its “impact on the community.”

“Recently, we re-evaluated our mission statement,” she said. “We believe that history inspires imagination and creativity. Our old mission statement was more about collecting and preserving – it was pretty dull.”

The Los Altos History Museum now focuses on its impact on the community it serves – thus, the purpose behind this year’s Fandango is partly to re-familiarize Los Altos area residents with their forgotten heritage.

“We’re trying to teach people about a history of a time period a lot of people don’t really understand,” Bajuk said. “Unless they grew up here, nobody learned about that time period. And a lot of people who are here didn’t grow up here.”

Although few physical traces remain of the once-flourishing ranchos, the legacy of the Californios is sifted, often unrecognized, into the names of local streets, the ingredients in food and the ways the community comes together.

“I really think (rancho culture is) part of our whole California barbecue outdoor dining lifestyle,” McMahan said. “It’s also in the kind of food we like – for example, we all love olive oil, and that’s about as linked to our past as you can get.”

Tickets for the “Fandango” event are $95 members, $115 nonmembers and $40 youth.

For tickets and more information, call Aja Sorensen at 948-9427, ext. 14, or visit www.losaltoshistory.org.

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