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News

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council earmarked $7,000 for the purchase of Chris Johanson’s artwork.

The city of Los Altos will contribute $7,000 toward the purchase of a $28,000 art installation featured in the San Francisco Museum...

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Schools

LASD students celebrate service learning

LASD students celebrate service learning


Courtesy of Sandra McGonagle
We Day, held March 26 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, exhorts students in the Los Altos School District to effect positive change.

More than 150 Los Altos School District student leaders joined 16,000 Bay Area students to ce...

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Community

Film career launches with Cannes screening

Film career launches with Cannes screening


Courtesy of Zachary Ready
Los Altos native Zachary Ready, front left, and co-director Andrew Cathey, right, celebrate their Campus MovieFest awards.

After learning the art of filmmaking as a child in the front yard of his family’s Los Altos home...

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Sports

Sports on the Side

Pathways Run/Walk slated May 10 in Hills

The 13th annual Pathways Run/Walk is scheduled 9 a.m. May 10 at Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. The course wends through Byrne Preserve and onto the Los Altos Hills Pathways sys...

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Comment

Now is the time to expand parking: Editorial

Just a few short years ago, vacancies dotted downtown Los Altos. Property owners had a hard time attracting businesses because there was a shortage of customers. That is no longer true. Now, the cry is: Where are my customers going to park?

The city...

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Special Sections

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability


Courtesy of Michael McTighe
Mary Clark Bartlett is founder and CEO of Los Altos-based Epicurean Group.

Labels such as “healthy,” “organic” and “green” are rarely used to describe the meals served in most corporate cafes in Silicon Valley. But on...

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Business

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Coldwell Banker recently recognized realtor Kim Copher, right, for her philanthropic efforts. Copher and colleague Alan Russell, left, volunteer at Reach Potential Movement, where they collect books for its Bookshelf in ...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthy

RotaCare honors local volunteer

RotaCare Bay Area honored Jim Cochran of the RotaCare Mountain View Free Medical Clinic with the Outstanding Clinic Volunteer Award April 10 for his commitment to RotaCare’s mission of providing free medical care to t...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

Western Ballet performs this weekend  at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills

Western Ballet performs this weekend at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills


Courtesy of Alexi Zubiria
Western Ballet’s “La Fille Mal Gardée” features Alison Share and Maykel Solas. The production runs Friday and Saturday at Foothill College

Western Ballet is slated to perform “La Fille Mal GardéeR...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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Stanford scholar examines commercialization of Christian rock

Based on his study of the booming Christian music industry, a Stanford University professor determined that the commercialization of Christian rock might be undermining its spiritual purpose.

Every Sunday around the country, pastors use Christian-themed rock music to engage their parishioners. Sounding much like standard top-40 pop-music fare, these scripture-based tunes are also becoming more popular on the radio and with consumers.

However, as popular Christian worship music gains a larger audience, Ari Kelman, associate professor of education at Stanford, has uncovered a surprising paradox: The very musicians, songwriters and music producers who create the music are increasingly sensitive to the relationship between rock music and worship.

Kelman, director of a new doctoral program in Stanford’s Graduate School of Education that integrates education and Jewish studies, found that evangelical musicians, like any other musical artists, aim to make the very best music they can. They hope their music will “at best, lead people in prayer, and at least, not mislead them,” he said.

The secularization of religious music

But it is this decidedly secular approach to music production that causes industry professionals who produce spiritual music to question the role that worship songs have assumed in the church.

Through the course of his research, Kelman learned that these specialized musicians feel they are embracing a secular culture that threatens to undermine the “prayerful purpose” of the music.

Kelman, whose current research focuses on the intersection of religion and pop culture, interviewed more than 75 songwriters, worship leaders and music producers and participated in numerous workshops and conferences on worship music.

Songwriters and performers “ultimately hope that the sacred purpose will trump the music’s secular origins,” he said. “The music ends up echoing with both sacred and secular overtones – one never trumps the other.”

But Kelman quotes Martin Smith, lead singer and primary songwriter of the Christian rock band Delirious, as saying, “As the genre of worship music developed into something more popular, it lost focus. We’ve become too song focused and, in truth, we need to become more worship focused.”

Kelman points to Bob Kauflin, a longtime Christian songwriter and teacher, as an example of someone who creates worship music yet is fully aware of the power of worship music to derail spiritual aims.

According to Kauflin, music is a gift from God to deepen and develop the relationship with Him.

However, when the song “becomes an idol … when the performer becomes the mediator … when people can’t worship God unless the music sounds a certain way, when they can’t worship God unless they sing these certain songs,” then the songwriters “have messed it up,” he added.

Kelman underscored the powerful role that musicians and music producers assume in faith practices.

“If people sing their faith, then those who write, perform and produce this music” become central to worship performance and practice, he said.

Worship songs, Kelman noted, seek to model a “heavenly version of prayer” derived from Christian scripture. They attempt to deliver theology while leading the audience through a performance by listening and singing along to a scriptural message.

Exploring the music, prayer connection

Kelman said he first envisioned his project as a reflection on what “the connection was between music and prayer, and the feeling of transcendence or powerful presence that music often evoked” in him.

Kelman, who is Jewish, grew up attending synagogue, where he first encountered music in a religious setting. However, he described the experience as less inspiring than attending rock concerts, where “often great, inspiring and uplifting things” happened.

Kelman developed an interest in worship music through his research on synagogues. He discovered that when he asked Jewish people about their music, they would often reply, “It’s spiritual” or “It’s so meaningful.”

However, personally, the music didn’t impress Kelman as “particularly interesting or innovative.” So he began thinking, “Who in the world is asking questions about music and spirituality in sophisticated ways?” This, Kelman explained, “led me to church.”

Kelman did not set out to debunk any widely held myths about evangelical culture. However, he encountered some, nonetheless.

“Lots of people have said to me, ‘Oh, you must have to listen to such terrible music,’” he said.

But he maintains that “much of the music is really good.”

Kelman’s research on evangelical worship music culture will be presented in his forthcoming book, tentatively titled “Shout to the Lord: Music and Worship in Evangelical America.”

Ashley Walters is a doctoral student in Jewish history at Stanford University. For more information on the humanities at Stanford, visit humanexperience.stanford.edu.

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