Tue02092016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky’s ‘Onegin’

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky’s ‘Onegin’


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305 Mid...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Girls dream big at Athena Camp


Photo By: Photo By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Photo By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier At Athena Camps’ closing ceremonies, above, students receive certificates and congratulations from fellow campers.

Everything is intentional at Athena Camps.

Organizers of the summer day camps, held at Loyola School through August, designed the program to build confidence in young girls, ages 5-11, through sports, art and affirming group discussions.

The camps’ activities fulfill three purposes – let the girls be themselves, connect with each other and learn from strong female role models, according to Aby Ryan, Athena Camps CEO and founder.

“When I started Athena Camps, I wanted to address character building and all the issues girls face growing up – cliques, bullying, losing their voice,” Ryan said. “I wanted the girls to feel special and unique and also connected to each other, and give them a place where they just feel free to express who they are.”

Celebrating girl power

The one-week sessions focus on two sports and art projects centered on an overarching theme, such as “Dream Big,” “Inner Beauty” or “Celebrating Friendship.” Campers, separated by age, rotate through three stations throughout the day, one for each sport and the final for arts and crafts. Sports activities are noncompetitive, instead focusing on technical training and games. The arts and crafts, from dream catchers to friendship bracelets, underscore the weekly theme. Coaches and directors facilitate discussions aimed at empowering the girls.

“We have girl-power games and inspirational discussions, and try to let them just get their bodies moving,” Ryan said. “We’re intentional about all the lessons.”

The setting of Athena Camps is perhaps as important as the activities. The camps, set up on the grass and blacktop and in a classroom at Loyola, are quiet, the quarters close so that the girls “feed off each other’s positive energy” and feel safe without the pressure of observation, Ryan said. The arts and crafts are held in a room covered with the girls’ drawings – a relaxation corner on the edge of the room boasts beanbags and girl-centered books that offer a respite from collage making and painting.

A team of coaches and a director oversee every activity. Ryan said she hires young women in college, usually student athletes, an attempt to tap into their “energy.”

“These coaches are all college girls, with some experience of being on a team and new life experiences,” she said. “They can relate to the girls while also teaching them by just being themselves.”

A model for growth

The coaches, setting and activities have created a formula for Athena Camps, which is now held at three locations in the Bay Area. Since its inception in 2011, the program has grown from serving 300 girls to more than 500 in locations in Willow Glen, San Jose and now Los Altos.

While Ryan was surprised by the growth, she said she still has big goals.

“I’d like to replicate the experience in more places in the Bay Area, but keep the magic and the quality of the camp,” she said.

So far, feedback from both parents and girls has been positive. Girls at a recent camp said their experiences were “awesome.” Three stepped forward to show their “affirmation” bracelets – jewelry that Ryan and her team award to a group of girls each day for standout behavior. Each bracelet has a message – “Dream Big,” “Never Give Up,” “Dare to Dream.” Ryan said the giving of the bracelets – the recognition that they had done something positive – is by far the girls’ favorite part of the day. By the end of each week, every girl will receive a bracelet. It’s a gift Ryan gives away, but she said she gets another in return.

“It’s a gift to feel I’m a channel to give away all the gifts I was given,” she said. “I can’t believe I get to do this.”

Athena Camps sessions cost $375 per week.

To register and for more information, visit www.athenacamps.com.

Athena Camp 2013 - Photos By Ellie Van Houtte/Los Altos Town Crier

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