Fri04172015

News

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Trader Joe's employees survey the damage after a car smashed through the glass doorway earlier today.

Trader Joe’s on Homestead Road is closed for the remainder of the day (April 17) after a car barreled through the glas...

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Schools

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pinewood School senior Georgia Lyon wrote and illustrated “How to Be Human: Diary of an Autistic Girl” in 2013.

Although first published under a pseudonym, Pinewood School student Georgia Lyon is stepping out to ...

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Community

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Volunteers and staff at the American Cancer Society's Discovery Shop in downtown Los Altos urge shoppers to "Be A Gem, Buy A Jewel" during the shop's special sale this Friday (April 17) and Saturday (April 18).

The sale is an opportunity to find Mot...

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Comment

Editorial: Let's assume not to presume

Two recent downtown Los Altos stories offer lessons in the drawbacks of jumping to conclusions.

A few months back, the Town Crier published an article on Ladera Autoworks on First Street closing its doors. That part was true, but the reason was not....

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Chrissy Huang, manager of Steinway Piano Gallery in Los Altos, showcases Steinway & Sons’ signature instruments. The gallery plans to host concerts with performers tickling the ivories.

A new downtown Los Altos bus...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

GREG STAHLER

GREG STAHLER

Greg Stahler died unexpecdly in his home in Belmont on March 26, 2015. (He was born in Mountain View on June 23, 1972). He will really be missed by three beautiful young children, Haley 7, Hannah 5, and Tyler 3, and his wife Kathryn. He will also b...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View


Courtesy of Lyn Flaim Healy/ Spotlight Moments Photography
Noelle Merino stars in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Those Darn Squirrels.”

The Peninsula Youth Theatre’s world premiere adaptation of “Those Darn Squirrels” is scheduled Friday and Saturda...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Green Pastures staff member JP Mercada, below right, helps Tommy, who lives at the group home, sort through papers and organize his room.

Tucked in the corner of a quiet residential cul-de-sac in Mountain View, Green Pastur...

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First one in the gym, last one to leave


Photo By: Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Photo Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier Golden State Warriors guard Kent Bazemore speaks to campers last week at Foothill College. He just completed his rookie season.

The seemingly endless amount of energy Kent Bazemore exuded during his rookie season with the Golden State Warriors – whether he was on the court or on the bench – was on full display last week in Los Altos Hills.

Speaking in front of 137 youngsters attending the Warriors Basketball Camp at Foothill College, Bazemore couldn’t stand still as he told them about his rise from small-town kid to pro basketball player.

As he paced inside the large semicircle formed by an army of attentive campers, the 6-foot-5 guard explained how he made the NBA as an unheralded rookie last year and what it will take to remain in the league.

“First one in the gym and last one to leave. It sounds cliché, but that’s what you’ve got to do,” said Bazemore, wearing a long-sleeved Warriors T-shirt, gray sweatpants and bright-yellow high-top sneakers. “You’ve got to work hard.”

Bazemore was up at 4:45 a.m. that day, he told the campers, making sure to get in an extensive workout at the team’s practice facility before heading to Foothill.

There are few days off for an undrafted player like Bazemore, entering the final year of his partially guaranteed contract.

In an interview after the June 25 appearance, Bazemore told the Town Crier he started his offseason training two weeks after the Warriors were eliminated from the NBA playoffs in mid-May. He works with Warriors staff members daily on his shooting (“I’m extending my range”), ball handling and his specialty – defense.

“I’m working on closeouts and how to defend certain players,” said Bazemore, named the nation’s top defensive player as a senior at Old Dominion University.

Despite his defensive prowess, Bazemore was ignored on draft day a year ago. He told the campers that a DUI arrest and foot injury between his junior and senior seasons didn’t help him.

But Bazemore got a chance to show what he could do in the Las Vegas Summer League, playing well enough to earn a deal with the Warriors. Although he didn’t play much as a rookie – bouncing back and forth from the Warriors and their NBA Development League team in Santa Cruz – Bazemore suited up for the playoffs.

“It was kind of like I went from two totally different extremes,” he said. “I went from not getting drafted to our team having a great chance to play for an NBA championship. It was a great ride.”

Bazemore logged 17 minutes in the playoffs, and his lone basket was nearly the most important of the Warriors’ second-round series against the San Antonio Spurs. He gave Golden State a one-point lead on a reverse layup with 3.9 seconds left in double overtime, only to see the Spurs’ Manu Ginobili drain a jumper two seconds later to win the series opener.

“That was a tough way to lose,” said Bazemore, whose team fell to the Spurs in six games.

That may have been the biggest bucket of Bazemore’s pro career, yet he’s probably still better known for his sideline celebrations. His animated antics – which include kneeling while pointing an arm to the sky with three fingers extended and the other two forming a “0” – have been dubbed “Bazemoring.” It may not rival “Tebowing” – or even “Kaepernicking” – but Bazemore’s enthusiastic support of his teammates is more popular than he ever could have envisioned.

“I just want to bring energy – whether I’m on the floor or on the bench – and be that spark for the guys,” Bazemore said. “I would have never thought in a million years that the ‘Bazemoring’ thing would be what it is. It’s kind of a big deal in the Bay Area. You take a picture with a fan and they want you to do it. It’s crazy.”

Bazemore isn’t one to shy away from fans – especially youngsters like those he met at Foothill.

“It’s probably the most underrated part of the game – the influence you have on young kids,” he said. “It’s crazy, because growing up, you idolize players and do the stuff they do, and then to actually have someone (idolize you), it’s gratifying.”

Bazemore has come a long way since his days as a youth in Kelford, N.C., which he pointed out has only twice as many people as last week’s sold-out camp drew.

But Bazemore isn’t ready to proclaim that he’s made it. He recalled being ranked 499th out of 500 players by ESPN at the start of last season – something that’s motivated him to improve.

Bazemore reminds himself of this by writing “499” on one of his shoes before each game.

“I’m sure every player has doubters – it happens in the game of basketball – and people handle it differently,” he said. “I’ve embraced it.”

And Bazemore said that no matter how good he gets and how long he plays, the “499” stays.

“No question,” he said. “It’s something that’s going to stick.”

For more photos from Bazemore's visit to the Warriors Basketball Camp, click here.


Kent Bazemore visits Warriors Basketball Camp - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Los Altos Town Crier

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