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News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Resources offer easy-to-digest tips for gluten-free diet


Photo By:

Gluten-free diets are all the rage. Visit any grocery store today and you will find a plethora of food choices labeled “gluten-free.” Bring up “gluten” in a group of people and there is a good chance someone has tried or is trying to avoid eating wheat. But is gluten-free for everyone?

Gluten, a protein in wheat, rye and barley, is found primarily in food but also in medicines, vitamins and even lip balms.

Certain health conditions require living without gluten. People with celiac disease, a digestive condition that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food, must completely avoid gluten. Celiac disease runs in families, is diagnosed in both children and adults and tends to occur in people with other immune disorders, such as Type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune thyroiditis.

There are hundreds of possible symptoms of celiac disease, including diarrhea, weight loss, anemia and migraines. Sometimes there are no overt symptoms. Because celiac can be difficult to detect, a blood test for antibodies is needed.

Dermatitis herpetiformis, a related skin condition, also requires a gluten-free diet.

According to the National Institutes of Health, more than 3 million people suffer from celiac disease in the U.S., and many more are likely undiagnosed. In fact, as many as 5 to 10 percent of the population may have some sort of gluten sensitivity, even if they don’t actually have celiac disease.

Such people manifest a range of symptoms, from gastrointestinal to neurological, and often find they feel better when they avoid gluten. The only treatment for celiac is a gluten-free diet.

Eating gluten-free when you are not celiac or gluten sensitive is a controversial topic. People with normal digestion who go gluten-free may be missing important nutrients, such as fiber, B and D vitamins, calcium and iron. If you think you may have celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis or gluten sensitivity, don’t try to go gluten-free on your own. It’s important to see a doctor for an accurate diagnosis while you are still eating a normal diet.

Books provide advice on gluten-free living

Once you know you must stick to a gluten-free diet, learning more about how to change your lifestyle is key. Several books at Stanford Health Library may be helpful.

“Living Gluten-Free For Dummies” (Wiley, 2006) is a good place to start. This book is a great resource, offering readers a complete overview of all aspects of life without wheat, barley or rye. Author Danna Korn, a celiac patient who has been gluten-free since 1991, includes much of her personal experience in her story.

The book follows the familiar “Dummies” format, breaking the subject into easy-to-digest sections (no pun intended), including informative sidebars throughout and the popular “Part of Tens” lists of 10 helpful tips at the end. “Living Gluten-Free For Dummies” is full of recipes that sound delicious, along with information about planning meals, shopping and eating out sans gluten.

Another book that makes the prospect of living without gluten manageable, even appealing, is “Let’s Eat Out with Celiac/Coeliac & Food Allergies!: A Timeless Reference for Special Diets” (R & R, 2010). This book will make you hungry. It offers guidelines for dining gluten- and allergy-free in six cuisines: Mexican, Italian, American, Chinese, French and Thai. Also valuable are suggestions for snacks, breakfast and drinks; food preparation checklists; and airline, hotel and cruise travel tips.

Co-authors Kim Koeller and Robert La France bring their personal and professional expertise to the work. Koeller has celiac disease, along with other food allergies, and La France has extensive experience in the restaurant business. They say they write from “both sides of the table,” and their varied perspectives, as consumer and provider, make for interesting reading. Their collaboration has resulted in a series of award-winning “Let’s Eat Out”/“Gluten-Free Passport” books.

Both children and adults are diagnosed with celiac disease, so feeding a family without gluten can be especially challenging. “Incredible, Edible Gluten-Free Food for Kids: 150 Family-Tested Recipes” (Woodbine House, 2002) teaches parents how to prepare and serve gluten-free foods that children will enjoy.

Author Sheri L. Sanderson, mother of a celiac child, instructs readers on how to begin and maintain a no-gluten lifestyle. The book includes comfort food recipes that sound tasty, and Sanderson offers tips on handling social events that are important in children’s lives, like birthday parties.

The main branch of Stanford Health Library is located at Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201, Palo Alto. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400 or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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