Wed09172014

News

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates


Nine candidates have filed to run for three open seats on the Mountain View City Council in the Nov. 4 election – none of them incumbents. The Town Crier asked them to introduce themselves to readers in the following Q&A format. We knew the...

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Schools

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The Los Altos School District’s newly expanded Facilities Advisory Committee met for the first time last week. The 28-member committee’s first task is to prioritize campus improvement projects.

The Los Altos Scho...

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Community

Sports

New-look Lancers find their footing

New-look Lancers find their footing


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Jenna Adams, left, and Carly Deale attempt to bump the ball Friday night. The juniors combined for 28 kills.

This year’s St. Francis High girls volleyball team faintly resembles last season’s squad ...

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Special Sections

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
An estimated 75 supporters of higher teacher pay turned out for the Sept. 4 Mountain View Whisman School District board meeting.

Teachers, trustees and administrators are recovering from a dramatic Mountain View Whism...

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Business

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Esthetician Marjan Kashi showcases one of the treatment rooms at her new studio, Pure Serenity Skincare at Rancho Shopping Center. Kashi provides services including microdermabrasion and various light and heat energy the...

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Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

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People

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

Resident of San Jose and Los Altos, California

July 21, 1931 to August 4, 2014

Born in Arimo, Idaho, to Jerald Emmett and Rebecca Henderson Nelson Christiansen. Raised in Davis and Riverside, California, with summers in Downey, Idaho, and in Loga...

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Travel

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska


Sandy Powell/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident and bird photographer Sandy Powell recently visited Homer, Alaska, to photograph Sandhill cranes, below. While there, Powell also encountered moose, left.

Los Altos resident Sandy Powell, a...

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Stepping Out

Pear puts on a pair of plays

Pear puts on a pair of plays


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Dan Kapler (as Teddy) and Betsy Kruse Craig (Trish) star in Pear Avenue Theatre’s “House.”

The Pear Avenue Theatre production of two interlocking comedies by Alan Ayckbourn – “House&...

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Spiritual Life

Back to Church Sunday offers opportunity to recommit

The children in Los Altos are back to school, and I can still hear parents cheering. Summer is officially over, even if the calendar doesn’t quite think so.

Parents have attended Back to School nights to meet their children’s teachers. B...

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Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host...

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Effective treatments prevent spread of head lice in children


Photo By: Town Crier File photo
Photo Town Crier File Photo

Head lice are primarily spread through contact among school-age children. Companies such as LoveBugs in Los Altos, above, offer head-lice treatments in lieu of over-the-counter remedies.

If you’ve ever looked at your child’s hair in the sunlight and seen the quick movement of little critters against his or her scalp, you know what it’s like to realize that your child has contracted head lice. It’s one of those moments most parents don’t want to relive.

Head lice are a nuisance, but they don’t pose a health hazard, they aren’t a sign of poor hygiene and they don’t spread disease. If your child has lice, there are effective, safe and inexpensive ways to treat the problem.

Head lice are primarily spread by head-to-head contact. They are common in school-age children who huddle together while reading, working on school projects or participating in circle time. Lice can’t jump or fly to another person’s head.

Head lice can be tricky to see because they’re tiny, avoid light and move quickly. A common symptom of head lice is an itchy scalp, but that can also be caused by dandruff, eczema or an allergic reaction.

To confirm whether or not your child has lice, have him or her sit in a brightly lit room or out in the sun. Part the hair and look at your child’s scalp to find live lice and lice eggs, called “nits.” Nits are tiny white or tan, oval-shaped beads that are firmly attached to the hair approximately one-quarter inch from the scalp. It’s easy to confuse nits with other things such as dandruff or specks of dirt. If you can remove the particle easily, it’s probably not a nit.

It’s important to start treatment as soon as possible to limit the lice spreading to others. Start with an over-the-counter shampoo treatment that contains pyrethrum and piperonlyl butoxide, a naturally occurring chemical from the chrysanthemum flower (RID or TripleX), or 1 percent permethrin (Nix). These treatments are safe and approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for children 2 and older.

These head lice treatments kill live lice, but they may not kill all the nits. You’ll need to repeat the treatment seven to 10 days after the first treatment. You can also use a nit comb after the hair has been treated to help ensure that all the eggs are removed.

If an over-the-counter treatment doesn’t get rid of the lice, talk to your child’s doctor about prescription treatments. If you want to avoid chemicals, your doctor can provide guidance. There are companies that will handle lice removal, but it’s best to talk to your doctor about their methods.

Lice are primarily spread by head-to-head contact, so your main focus should be on treating family members with lice. The following may also help.

• Wash your child’s clothes, towels, hats and bed linens in hot water and dry them using high heat.

• Place and store items that can’t be washed in plastic bags for two weeks.

• Vacuum the floor and furniture, particularly where your child has sat or played.

Your child should go back to school after one treatment with an anti-lice shampoo. Some schools have a “no nits” policy, but the American Academy of Pediatrics discourages this, as it’s important for children not to miss school, and nits are not contagious.

It’s difficult to protect your child from being exposed to lice. But while these little critters pose an inconvenience, they don’t pose a health threat and there are many effective treatments.

Dr. Swati Pandya is a board-certified pediatrician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s West Valley Center.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and column editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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