Wed04162014

News

Late postal hours help last-minute filers

Late postal hours help last-minute filers

The crowd at Los Altos' post office wasn't epic when we checked today – but come tax day tomorrow (April 15) many locals may be lining up to file at the last minute.

Post offices in Los Altos and Mountain View stop collecting mail at 5 p.m. tomorr...

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Schools

Loyola School hosts STEM Expo

Loyola School hosts STEM Expo


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Ari Garabedia, above right, demonstrates his team’s project for curious classmates at Loyola School’s STEM Expo.

Some local schools are taking a different twist on the traditional science fair this year.

As a pilot p...

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Community

Chef Pépin to sign books in Los Altos

Chef Pépin to sign books in Los Altos

Master chef, author and educator Jacques Pépin is scheduled to make a personal appearance in Los Altos April 24. The “original Iron Chef” will be signing copies of his most recent books 3-5 p.m. at Main Street Café and Books, 134 Main St. The interna...

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Sports

Fruitful day on the Farm

Fruitful day on the Farm


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High’s Brian Yeager soars in the triple jump at the Stanford Invitational Saturday.

Last weekend’s Stanford Invitational attracted the best high school track and field athletes in the region, including sever...

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Comment

The mysterious force in Los Altos: The Rockey Road

Shh ... it’s a secret. No it isn’t! I recently read a story in another paper asking if Google cash were behind the Los Altos downtown makeover and why. My first thought was, “Who cares?” We are an intelligent group in a small town where it is very di...

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Special Sections

Jewish food festival reaches beyond bagels

Who knew you could get a decent knish in Silicon Valley?

For at least one day, local foodies are gathering 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 27 at the Hazon Jewish Food Festival at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto to eat their way throug...

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Business

For the skin they're in : Shared interest in organic skin care leads duo to form company

For the skin they're in : Shared interest in organic skin care leads duo to form company


Ellie Van Houtte/town Crier
Nancy Newsom, left, and Kit Gordon started Botanic Organic in 2011 after they discovered a shared passion for creating organic, handmade skin-care products. The company now offers more than 15 products for adults and infa...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

MARGARET C. SNEAD

MARGARET C. SNEAD

In Cupertino, April 5, 2014

Age 95, preceded in death by her parents, John and Isabelle Coullie, her husband, Dr. Claude Rabert Snead, and her sister Maisie Bicking.

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

LA Stage Company's 'Harold and Maude' opens this weekend at Bus Barn Theater

LA Stage Company's 'Harold and Maude' opens this weekend at Bus Barn Theater


courtesy of Los Altos Stage Company
Warren Wernick and Lillian Bogovich play the title characters in the Los Altos Stage Company production of “Harold and Maude.” The play runs through May 4.

The Los Altos Stage Company’s production of “Harold a...

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Spiritual Life

Silicon Valley Prayer Breakfast highlights matters of faith

Pat Gelsinger and Reggie Littlejohn come from different backgrounds and occupations, but both, guided by their Christian faith, have become leaders committed to helping others. The two shared their experiences at the 20th annual Silicon Valley Prayer...

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Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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A century after initial plan, hotel finally becoming reality in Los Altos


Photo By: Courtesy of Don McDonald
Photo Courtesy Of Don Mcdonald

A 1908 ad promoting Los Altos announced a free “old-time Spanish barbeque,” pictured above, at “one of the most ideal spots on the peninsula (and) higher than Palo Alto.”

“Better late than never” could well be the motto of the new hotel under construction at the corner of Main Street and San Antonio Road in downtown Los Altos.

The earliest ad for the tiny community of Los Altos circa 1908 promised that “a hotel and bank and post office building are assured at once.” So, after a slight delay of 105 years, downtown Los Altos will finally have its promised hotel.

Thanks to the eagle eye of Jim Lyons, a dealer in historical newspapers, we uncovered this long-ago promise among other details relating to the picnic advertised in a photo from the Los Altos History Museum’s archives. Lyons unearthed the details in the pages of the 1908 Palo Altan.

An ad for the event announced a free “old-time Spanish barbeque” at “one of the most ideal spots on the peninsula (and) higher than Palo Alto.” The ad urged readers to “spend the day amid the woods and wild flowers of Los Altos (and) picnic along the banks (and) cozy nooks of Los Yuegas Creek.” Los Yuegas Creek is now Adobe Creek. Other features promised “delightful views of the Valley and Bay.” The price of the round-trip 11:55 a.m. railroad ticket was 25 cents, including the barbecue.

The picnic heralded the first major public offering of Los Altos lots for sale, most in the $400 to $600 range. Interested visitors were encouraged to board one of two special trains, one from San Francisco and the other from San Jose. They were the first passenger trains to travel over the new single tracks along what was then known as the “Palo Alto-Los Gatos Cutoff.”

The week after the picnic, the Palo Altan reported that the event was a great success, with nearly 3,000 people in attendance, including those who arrived by carriage and automobile. The article claimed that “nearly a ton of beef” was served and “plenty of agents” were on hand to sell lots. Event organizer Walter A. Clark announced sales of $160,000, a sum that we assume included sales to Paul Shoup and his relatives and friends. Clark referred to “many prominent people who had already purchased lots, (among them) officials on the SP and other railroads.”

In previous publicity, Clark mentioned the availability of “attractive sites for country homes (on land adjacent to Los Altos) “in the rolling hills above Yuegas Creek,” which eventually became Los Altos Hills.

A photo from 1910 documents the second major public sales event by the Altos Land Co., organized to celebrate the long-delayed opening of the Peninsula Railway electric line along the Palo Alto-Los Gatos Cutoff.

To entice visitors, the company offered a free excursion on the railway’s new electric cars. The 88 Los Altos residents who accepted the offer rode from the town’s temporary railroad station to Mayfield and to Palo Alto, where a light luncheon was served. The cars then went to Stanford University, where a photographer took a shot of the crowd gathered in front of the cars.

A San Jose Mercury article following the event reported that “the advent of the cars was cheered by all the towns passed through, and from all the farmhouses along the route, greetings were exchanged by the waving of handkerchiefs and hats.”

The Altos Land Co. was absorbed in a reorganization involving San Francisco financiers in 1913. The newly formed Los Altos Co. assumed control of the company’s assets. Although short on details, we believe that the primary reason for the reorganization was the town’s failure to grow as fast as had been planned.

We know from other sources that sales were somewhat disappointing. The panic of 1907 may have been a factor. Another problem could have been the heavy competition posed by other new real estate developments in San Francisco and along the Peninsula.

Shoup was the only officer of the Altos Land Co. to retain his position in the new company. He continued to earn his eventual posthumous reputation as the “Father of Los Altos.”

Don McDonald is a local historian and longtime volunteer with the Los Altos History Museum.

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