Thu07312014

News

"Brown is the new green," says local water district


Lina Broydo/Special to the Town Crier
Are downtown Los Altos flower pots getting too much water? The Santa Clara Valley Water District plans to hire “water cops” to discourage overwatering.

The Santa Clara Valley Water District is spending nearl...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Foothill camps prepare local students for STEM careers

Foothill camps prepare local students for STEM careers


Photos Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Middle school students make robotic hands using 3-D printers during a STEM Summer Camp at Foothill College.

From designing roller coasters to developing biodegradable plastics, high school students received an i...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local entrepreneur opens home to Afghan and Rwandan women

Local entrepreneur opens home to Afghan and Rwandan women


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Businesswomen Joan Mazimhaka of Rwanda, third from left, and Fakhria Ibrahimi of Afghanistan, in orange, traveled to the U.S. with a 26-woman delegation through the Peace Through Business program.

Employees scoop ice ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Moving on: The Rockey Road

Just over a month ago, we decided to put our house on the market. My husband and I had been tossing around the idea of moving back to the area where we grew up, which is only approximately 40 minutes from here. Of course, Los Altos is a great place t...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Halo heads to Los Altos: Blow-dry bar founder opens new First Street location Monday

Halo heads to Los Altos: Blow-dry bar founder opens new First Street location Monday


ElLie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
Armed with blow dryers, Halo founder Rosemary Camposano, left, and store manager Nikki Thomas prepare for the blow-dry bar’s grand opening on First Street Monday.

A blow-dry bar is set to open downtown Monday, and i...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

"Frozen in Time" chronicles harrowing WWII rescue attempts


Many readers can’t resist a true-life adventure story, especially those that shine a spotlight on people who exhibit supreme courage in the face of adversity and end up surviving – or not – against the odds.

Read more:

Loading...

People

DR. ALFRED HUGHES

Long time Los Altos resident, Dr. Alfred Hughes, died May 1st after a long illness. Dr. Hughes was born in 1927 in Maspeth, NY. He served in the US Army from 1945-6, attended Brooklyn Polytechnic University, then graduated from Reed College in Portla...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway


Courtesy of Ritz-Carlton
The Ritz-Carlton in Lake Tahoe offers fall getaway packages that include spa treatments and yoga classes.

Fall in North Lake Tahoe boasts crisp mornings and opportunities to spend quality time in the mountains. Specially ...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Wizard' winds down at Bus Barn

'Wizard' winds down at Bus Barn


Town Crier file photo
Local actors rehearse a scene from “The Wizard of Oz.”

Los Altos Youth Theatre and Los Altos Stage Company’s collaborative production of “The Wizard of Oz” is slated to close Sunday at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

T...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Stanford University appoints new dean for religious life

Stanford University appoints new dean for religious life


Shaw

Stanford University named the Very Rev. Dr. Jane Shaw, dean of Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, its new dean for religious life.

Provost John Etchemendy announced Shaw’s appointment July 21, adding that she also will join the faculty in...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

Read more:

Loading...

Sandberg’s ‘Lean In’ offers advice for women in the workplace


Photo By:

Sheryl Sandberg’s best-selling “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead” (Knopf, 2013), an inspirational and aspirational guide on women and leadership, has drawn support and nods of familiarity – not to mention a fair share of controversy.

As most tech-savvy types in the Bay Area know, Sandberg served as vice president of global online sales and operations at Google Inc. and is currently chief operating officer at Facebook Inc. She initially promoted the “Lean In” concept at a TED Talk presentation for entrepreneurs and innovators – and followed her discussion with a book of the same name and a website (leanin.org) designed to function as “a global community committed to encouraging and supporting women leaning in to their ambitions.”

Sandberg has researched her topic well and makes many excellent points about women in business pursuing leadership positions. She advises women to “lean in” by being ambitious and accepting challenges that they might tend to shy away from because they appear too difficult or outside their area of expertise. Excellent advice, in my opinion, and I doubt many people would disagree with Sandberg’s recommendation.

Sandberg suggests that women develop the confidence to “sit at the table,” believing in their abilities and not worrying about occasionally feeling like frauds. She notes that successful women are usually not perceived to be as likeable as their male counterparts and offers tips to combat the inequity. She uses the analogy of a career path being like a jungle gym rather than a simple ladder – for both men and women – with many routes to the top.

One of the most interesting chapters in the book addresses the value of mentorship. Sandberg writes that many seminars for women highlight the importance of mentors who will guide them throughout their careers. Instead of finding a mentor and then expecting success, Sandberg emphasizes that the message should be “excel and you will get a mentor.”

To enable female professionals to embark on fulfilling careers, according to Sandberg, male partners should be encouraged to step up to the plate and take on more responsibility at home. On the homefront, the answer to the questions “Can we have it all?” or “Can we do it all?” is no. And that’s OK – women simply need to realize that doing the best they can is good enough.

A number of people have complained that “Lean In” doesn’t address the lack of corporate efforts to promote women into leadership positions. Others have noted that Sandberg’s concept doesn’t include negotiating the challenges women at the bottom AND middle levels of business face. Valid as the criticisms may be, the book is chock-fulL of practical advice for women in the workplace at any level who want to advance.

Some have suggested that Sandberg is an elitist attempting to hijack feminism for personal gain. That didn’t come across to me at all. “Lean In” is a deeply important book that women (and most men) would benefit from reading. It should spark interesting conversations in the workplace, at home and for book clubs. I think everyone should read it, read reviews and critiques of it and then make up their minds. One of book’s chapters is titled “Let’s Start Talking About It.” I couldn’t agree more.

Leslie Ashmore is a longtime Mountain View resident who belongs to two book clubs.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos