Wed08052015

News

Residents help police nab burglary suspects

Residents help police nab burglary suspects


Courtesy of Los Altos Police Department
Police used security-camera footage to identify two burglary suspects.

With assistance from the public, Los Altos Police identified two suspects in a residential burglary earlier this year. Police arrested...

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Schools

BCS parents host summer bridge camp for students in need

BCS parents host summer bridge camp for students in need


Zoe Morgan/Town Crier Editorial Intern
Bullis Boosters Summer Bridge Camp counselor Sonia Uppal teaches students the basics of computer coding last week.

The Bullis Boosters Summer Bridge Camp aims to reduce the achievement gap by offering a hands-...

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Community

Los Altos resident continues work toward eradicating No. 1 cause of infant deaths

Los Altos resident continues work toward eradicating No. 1 cause of infant deaths


Courtesy of Marge Shively
Kathy Radford, from left, Ann Roper, Sandy Harapat, Betty Gillmore, Jane Halligan and Laura Griswald stuff envelopes to raise money for spinal muscular atrophy research.

Proceeds from the 13th annual NorCal Walk-n-Roll,...

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Sports

Lovin' Levi's

Lovin' Levi's


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Mountain View’s Austin Johnson, running after the catch, played multiple positions in Saturday’s game.

For Mountain View High’s Austin Johnson and Homestead’s John Rak, the highlight of playing in Saturday’s 41st annu...

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Comment

My solar clothes dryer: A Piece of My Mind

My cousin periodically sends me Internet nostalgia with comments along the lines of “Are you old enough to remember this?” One of her recent items struck me as newly useful in our energy-conservation-conscious times:

The Basic Rules for ...

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Special Sections

Killer crossover

Killer crossover


Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier
The 2016 Mercedes-Benz GLC crossover is scheduled to debut this fall in the United States.

After a press drive through the Alsace wine region between France and Germany in the 2016 Mercedes-Benz GLC, we have ...

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Business

Cetrella ventures from seaside to Silicon Valley

Cetrella ventures from seaside to Silicon Valley


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Managing partner M’hamed Bahet oversees the new downtown Los Altos restaurant Cetrella, which features coastal cuisine and decor that celebrates the Peninsula region.

“Rustic,” “worldly” and ...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

LILLIAN FLORENCE SLAVIN

LILLIAN FLORENCE SLAVIN

April 9, 1921 – July 17, 2015

Lillian Florence Slavin, long-time resident of Los Altos and The Forum at Rancho San Antonio, died peacefully on July 17, 2015.  She was 94 years old.

Lillian was born on April 9, 1921 to William Broadley and Fl...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Funny 'Forum'

Funny 'Forum'


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” features, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio.

Some plays are meant to be quite serious, while oth...

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Spiritual Life

Life is fleeting – and you can't take stuff with you

Anyone who knows me knows that I love going to garage and estate sales. I love a bargain. I have enough stuff to live on, so now I seek out things that are interesting to me. I like looking for interesting artwork, though now my wife has tasked me ...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Emotional control equates to higher incomes, expert tells Morning Forum


Photo By: Kathryn Tomaino/ Special to the Town Crier
Photo Kathryn Tomaino/ Special To The Town Crier

Psychology professor Robert Levenson, an expert on human emotions, explains how old age is a time of emotional vibrancy to a Morning Forum of Los Altos audience.

Psychology professor Robert Levenson, Ph.D., an expert on human emotion, discussed “How Our Emotional Lives Mature: Changes and New Strengths” at the Morning Forum of Los Altos May 7.

Levenson is director of the Institute for Personality and Social Research and the Clinical Science Program at UC Berkeley, which is studying ways emotions change as people age.

Previously, old age was considered a period of flat emotionality, according to Levenson. The current view is that it is a time of emotional vibrancy, refinement and well-being when close relationships become increasingly important.

Levenson studies emotional reactions to situations and how emotions affect lives. He observes the physiological effects of emotion in faces, voices, large muscles and bodily systems (for example, skin and cardiac and sweat glands).

Emotions, he said, are powerful in human beings. When we experience an emotion such as anger, disgust or sympathy. we begin thinking about ways of dealing with the situation that triggered it.

Emotions are necessary for survival, Levenson said. We react to stimuli and situations with emotions, which alert us to respond to the challenges or opportunities. We can regulate the emotions and adjust responses to meet situational demands. In general, the better we control emotional responses, the greater our sense of well-being and the higher our incomes, he added.

We also recognize and respond to the emotions of others. As we age, our ability to know what others are feeling improves.

“In healthy persons, the capacity to generate emotions doesn’t change from a person’s youth throughout their old age,” he said. “The ability to feel sadness increases as we age. While we experience sadness more strongly in old age, depression rates are lowest and a sense of well-being is highest in old age.”

Levenson noted that the capacity to feel sadness is characteristic of people who are satisfied with their lives. In late life, the ability to feel sadness makes people able to care for others and gives them the ability to be taken care of.

“Older people are better at seeing the good sides of situations,” he said. “These abilities contribute to a sense of well-being.”

Levenson stressed that each person ages differently. Late-life diseases (for example, Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia) affect the ability to generate emotions.

The Morning Forum of Los Altos is a members-only lecture series held at Los Altos Methodist Church, 655 Magdelena Ave. For membership details and more information, visit www.morningforum.org.

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