Sat02062016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

Emotional control equates to higher incomes, expert tells Morning Forum


Photo By: Kathryn Tomaino/ Special to the Town Crier
Photo Kathryn Tomaino/ Special To The Town Crier

Psychology professor Robert Levenson, an expert on human emotions, explains how old age is a time of emotional vibrancy to a Morning Forum of Los Altos audience.

Psychology professor Robert Levenson, Ph.D., an expert on human emotion, discussed “How Our Emotional Lives Mature: Changes and New Strengths” at the Morning Forum of Los Altos May 7.

Levenson is director of the Institute for Personality and Social Research and the Clinical Science Program at UC Berkeley, which is studying ways emotions change as people age.

Previously, old age was considered a period of flat emotionality, according to Levenson. The current view is that it is a time of emotional vibrancy, refinement and well-being when close relationships become increasingly important.

Levenson studies emotional reactions to situations and how emotions affect lives. He observes the physiological effects of emotion in faces, voices, large muscles and bodily systems (for example, skin and cardiac and sweat glands).

Emotions, he said, are powerful in human beings. When we experience an emotion such as anger, disgust or sympathy. we begin thinking about ways of dealing with the situation that triggered it.

Emotions are necessary for survival, Levenson said. We react to stimuli and situations with emotions, which alert us to respond to the challenges or opportunities. We can regulate the emotions and adjust responses to meet situational demands. In general, the better we control emotional responses, the greater our sense of well-being and the higher our incomes, he added.

We also recognize and respond to the emotions of others. As we age, our ability to know what others are feeling improves.

“In healthy persons, the capacity to generate emotions doesn’t change from a person’s youth throughout their old age,” he said. “The ability to feel sadness increases as we age. While we experience sadness more strongly in old age, depression rates are lowest and a sense of well-being is highest in old age.”

Levenson noted that the capacity to feel sadness is characteristic of people who are satisfied with their lives. In late life, the ability to feel sadness makes people able to care for others and gives them the ability to be taken care of.

“Older people are better at seeing the good sides of situations,” he said. “These abilities contribute to a sense of well-being.”

Levenson stressed that each person ages differently. Late-life diseases (for example, Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia) affect the ability to generate emotions.

The Morning Forum of Los Altos is a members-only lecture series held at Los Altos Methodist Church, 655 Magdelena Ave. For membership details and more information, visit www.morningforum.org.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos