Thu05052016

News

Hills man arrested on molestation charges

Hills man arrested on molestation charges

Gregory Helfrich

Updated 11:28 a.m.:

Santa Clara Sheriff’s detectives have arrested a Los Altos Hills man they suspect repeatedly molested a child decades ago.

Detectives arrested Gregory Helfrich, 54, on a warrant at his Old Page Mill R...

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Schools

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students


Courtesy of Jessica Harell
Blach Intermediate School seventh-grader Paris Harrell, who loves science and animals, recently received a scholarship from the local branch of the AAUW to attend Tech Trek camp.

It’s not every day that a junior hig...

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Community

At 98, former language teacher remains a lifelong learner

At 98, former language teacher remains a lifelong learner


Federici

Longtime Los Altos resident Mario Federici, who turned 98 Feb. 24, is a man of many languages. He shared his knowledge with thousands of students during his long career as a teacher.

Federici was born and raised in Italy, where he stud...

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Comment

Attend an event, get involved, have fun: Editorial

You don’t have to run for city council to get involved in the community. Sometimes it can be as simple as attending a Los Altos event. You’ll have plenty of opportunities, as the May and June calendars are bustling with activity.

The Dow...

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Special Sections

Racing around Monterey

Racing around Monterey


Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier
The easy handling of the VW Golf R, above, makes for an ideal ride along the Big Sur coast.

 

When automotive journalists are asked to list their favorite places in the world to drive, Monterey alway...

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Business

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations


Courtesy of Eureka
Eureka, a new restaurant in downtown Mountain View, highlights local craft beer and whiskeys on a menu of food spanning from sea to farm.

Craft beer and fancy whiskeys headline the menu at Eureka, the new restaurant that opene...

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People

Stepping Out

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'


Courtesy of Palo Alto Players
The Baker’s Wife, left, and Cinderella’s erstwhile Prince stand out in the Palo Alto Players production of “Into the Woods.”

Little Red Riding Hood sets forth at the outset of “Into the...

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Spiritual Life

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International


Courtesy of Los ALtos United Methodist Church
Hidden Villa will bring some of its farm animals to Los Altos United Methodist Church Sunday to support the nonprofit Heifer International.

Los Altos United Methodist Church is scheduled to salute th...

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State Street retailer The Makery strives to reintroduce arts and crafts to Los Altos


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
An array of colors greets customers who enter The Makery.

The door to The Makery swings open, revealing yarn, fabrics and kits arranged in a spectrum of colors.

Apart from the steady hum of a sewing machine and the tap of shoes on the hardwood floor, the room is quiet. The inkpads, rubber stamps and well-lit tables sit unmarked and unused. The entire shop hums with unfulfilled creative energy, ready for its new customers.

Los Altos entrepreneur Mary Heffernan launched the arts and crafts studio last month at 170 State St. It is a new addition to her growing stable of downtown Los Altos businesses that include Bumble, Area 151 and Red Racer Hobby Shop.

“I’ve always enjoyed arts and crafts, but it’s really hard to find all the best materials,” Heffernan said. “I wanted to create one place with all of the nicest materials, right here.”

The shop imports wool felt from Holland, felt balls from Nepal and yarn from Petaluma. It also boasts a Vandercook printing press, a screen-printing machine and a 3-D printer.

“It’s not Michaels,” said Heffernan with a laugh.

A crafty comeback

Heffernan is convinced that nostalgia isn’t the only value to be gained from The Makery’s printing press, carved stamps and writing ink, rendered obsolete by newer technology.

“Working with your hands is making a comeback,” she said. “I think with so much technology, people want to do something with their hands and come out with something they made.”

Despite the emphasis on handmade crafts, The Makery does not shy away from technology.

Customers can sign up for one-on-one instruction, but the studio also supplies iPads with tutorials at each station and a self-taught online program. Additionally, the studio offers computer-based design programs like Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and 3-D printing.

At The Makery, the H&H Co., co-owned by Heffernan and her husband, Brian, continues its trend of local sourcing.

“I think it’s important to be locally sourced,” Heffernan said. “Everything (aside from imported materials) you see here was manufactured locally.”

The store sells retail kits and products from other vendors, but Heffernan aspires to fill her shelves increasingly with Makery-made items.

The store’s employees, also known as “Makers,” create items onsite. The Makers have all worked professionally in the arts and crafts.

According to Heffernan, customers with a large variety of interests have shown up in the few days since the store opened. The only demographic the store doesn’t cater to is children.

“People assume it’s for kids, because many of our stores have been geared toward kids,” she said. “But we wanted to create an adult sanctuary.”

In fact, no one under the age of 14 is allowed in the main studio rooms. A separate courtyard features long picnic tables and art supplies to occupy children while the adults work at The Makery.

“There’s been some pushback about (the rule), but I think it’s really important, because when there are kids, you just can’t really focus on your craft.” Heffernan said. “Also, there’s a lot of heavy machinery.”

Heffernan’s studio and shop combination is geared toward making high-quality crafting handy for people with busy lives.

“We try to make it easy for people by preparing all the materials beforehand,” she said. “We pre-wrap the yarn, make kits and provide all the supplies and working space to increase efficiency.”

Heffernan hopes to spread her love of crafting to others who haven’t tried it before.

“I really hope that people who don’t consider themselves crafty would come and do something with their hands,” she added. “They could give it to someone, and say, ‘Hey, I made this.’”

For more information, call 397-5613 or visit makerylosaltos.com.


The Makery - Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Los Altos Town Crier

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