Sun05012016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

Mtn. View High students view horrors of drinking and driving


Photo By: Traci Newell/Town Crier
Photo Traci Newell/Town Crier In a mock exercise designed to dissuade students from drinking and driving, Mountain View firefighters use the Jaws of Life to extract “injured” students from a staged drunken-driving accident at Mountain View High School last week. The Every 15 Minutes program sponsored the event.

Mountain View High School students experienced firsthand the potential consequences of drinking and driving last week, when volunteers staged the Every 15 Minutes program.

Every 15 Minutes is a two-day exercise that challenges high school students to reflect on drinking alcohol, personal safety and mature decision-making when lives are at stake. Established in the 1990s, the program takes its name from the statistic that every 15 minutes in the U.S., someone dies from an alcohol-related collision. Since the program’s inception, that statistic has steadily improved – it is now only every 36 minutes.

The program stages a mock accident and faux injuries and deaths to communicate graphically the effects of drinking and driving.

Day one

The program began early April 17, with a person dressed as the Grim Reaper roaming the campus and removing 18 students and one teacher from their classes. Shortly afterward, a uniformed police officer entered the classrooms, informed students that their classmates had died from an alcohol-related vehicle accident and read their obituaries.

Meanwhile, the “victims” were transformed into the “living dead” via makeup and fake blood. Officials visited their parents at work or home to notify them of the deaths.

Staff, students and parents had been alerted ahead of time that this was a mock situation.

During fourth period, the students went to the football field to witness the aftermath of a drunken-driving accident.

Student Nicole Korpontinos, made up to look as if she were missing a limb and bleeding from her head, lay on the ground outside a car. A coroner took her “body” away.

Student Drew Taylor, the alleged driver of a vehicle littered with empty beer bottles, exited the car and realized what had happened as a result of his decision to drink and drive. After failing a sobriety test, Taylor was escorted away in the back of a California Highway Patrol car. At the jail, he was fingerprinted and booked.

As part of the exercise, Kor-pontinos’ parents went to the morgue to identify her body.

Two students, Russell Blockhus and Aimee Fontanilla, were trapped in another vehicle as emergency responders used the Jaws of Life to extract them. Ambulances transported Blockus and Fontanilla to Valley Medical Center.

After viewing the “accident,” students returned to their classrooms and resumed their studies – minus a few faces and haunted by the memories of the realistic scene.

Blockhus and Fontanilla arrived at Valley Medical Center for treatment but later “died” from their injuries. When their parents arrived, doctors informed them that their children were dead.

Following the exercise, the “living dead” and “crash” participants took part in an overnight retreat where they practiced team building and played trust games. Their absences from home and school intensified the emotions of family and friends after witnessing what could have been a real-life tragedy.


Every 15 Minutes simulation - Images by Los Altos Town Crier

Day two

The program concluded Thursday with an emotional mock funeral.

The “living dead” and “crash” victims marched into the assembly carrying a white casket covered with flowers and led by a bagpiper.

Parents and friends, fighting back tears, shared what they wished they could have said to the dead students before it was too late.

“You’ve been that friend that has always been there,” one student said of Blockhus. “I was looking forward to our future. I don’t know what I’ll do without you, but I’ll miss you forever.”

“I’m here and you’re not,” one student said. “There are so many things I wish I could tell you – what happened to you should not have happened.”

Parents shared the heartache of never seeing their son or daughter learn to drive, graduate, attend college or get married.

Some of the “living dead” shared what they wished they could have told their parents.

“Dad, I’m sorry for disappointing you more often than not,” one student said.

“Today I died,” another student said. “I never got the chance to tell you how much I love you. Over the past 17 years, I’ve tried not to disappoint you and I’ve screwed up in the worst way.”

Then the program’s keynote speaker, Louise Roy, shared the true story of how she lost her son on his 21st birthday. Her son had promised to be smart and not get behind the wheel when drinking.

“When you are drinking, all those promises go out the window,” she said.

Roy received the dreaded call approximately 2 a.m. the day after his birthday – he had died in a motorcycle accident.

“There will always be this hole in my heart,” she said. “I still wake up and have to remind myself that he is no longer with us.”

She said she shares the “worst day” of her life to reach out to students – even if only one person hears the message.

“I’m sick of seeing young people die,” she said. “You are all as precious as my son.”

The audience gave Roy a standing ovation.

The assembly ended with a challenge to students to make good choices – never drink and drive and never get in a car with a driver who has been drinking.

For more information, visit www.every15minutes.com.

 

 

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