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News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

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Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

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Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

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Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

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Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

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Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

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Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

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Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Prevent prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

You could be on the fast track to diabetes and don’t even know it. Prediabetes and the related metabolic syndrome may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but they do put you on the path to Type 2 diabetes and its complications: heart attacks and strokes, nerve damage, vision loss, kidney failure and more.

Chances are good that you or someone you know has one or all of these conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that as many as 80 million American adults have impaired glucose (blood sugar) control that signals prediabetes. Almost as many more have metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that are harbingers of diabetes. These diseases are often silent and go untreated until the symptoms of actual diabetes appear.

The digestive system turns carbohydrates into blood glucose. As this glucose rises, the pancreas releases insulin, which allows glucose to move out of the blood stream into the muscle cells and be burned, along with oxygen, to produce energy. When insulin resistance develops, the system is impaired, ultimately leading to Type 2 diabetes.

If your fasting blood glucose is 100 to 125 mg/dl, chances are you’ve got prediabetes. Metabolic syndrome, not a disease in itself, is a constellation of conditions, usually related to obesity. If you’ve got any three of these – a waist larger than 35 inches for women or 39 inches for men, blood pressure higher than 129/84, high blood sugar or insulin resistance, high triglycerides or low good cholesterol (HDL under 50) – you’ve got metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance means that your body does not use the hormone insulin as effectively as it should, especially in the muscles and liver.

The good news is that both prediabetes and metabolic syndrome can be stopped in their tracks with simple lifestyle changes, most notably diet, weight-loss and exercise. You are not doomed to become diabetic. Explore the resources at Stanford Health Library to learn more about these conditions and ways to control their effects.

A good place to start is the ever-popular “Dummies” series. “Prediabetes for Dummies” (Wiley, 2009) by Alan L. Rubin, M.D., is a great primer for people who want to learn about the condition and how to beat it. It is a highly palatable book, written in plain English. It tackles a serious topic in a light, friendly way. Loaded with valuable information for patients of all ages, the book explains causes and treatment of prediabetes and offers suggestions for diet and exercise.

The book includes a week-by-week plan to help readers become healthier in three months and an excellent chapter on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to prediabetes.

No “Dummies” book would be complete without a section of “Tens,” summarizing the book’s main points in easy-to-follow lists. These include “Ten Myths about Prediabetes,” “Ten Staples to Keep in Your Kitchen” and “Ten Things to Teach Your Prediabetic Child.”

Another excellent resource focused on diet in prediabetes is available as an electronic book from the Stanford Health Library website. “Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes: A Mindful Eating Program for Thriving with Prediabetes or Diabetes” (New Harbinger, 2012) by Michelle May, M.D., can be found online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/ebooks.html. Follow the instructions for entering the user name and password, then search for the title or enter “prediabetes” in the search box.

The seminal work on the metabolic syndrome is “Syndrome X, The Silent Killer: The New Heart Disease Risk” (Simon & Schuster, 2000) by Stanford University’s Gerald Reaven, M.D. “Syndrome X” is another term for metabolic syndrome. Although the book was published 13 years ago, it remains a classic and offers helpful information supported by excellent documentation.

A new book at Stanford Health Library, “Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) by authors T. Barry Levine and Arlene Bradley Levine focuses on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to heart disease. Written for clinicians, the authors carefully explain the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and offer rationale for effective interventions. There is an interesting discussion on the importance of sleep, in addition to the roles caloric restriction and bariatric surgery play in controlling the syndrome.

There are many more resources at Stanford Health Library, where research assistance and information packets are available free of charge. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/endocrine_diabetes.html#pre.

Stanford Health Library is now located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. The library is free and open to the public 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Access is also available on the third floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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