Wed10222014

News

Council hosts study session on downtown parking garage

Council hosts study session on downtown parking garage


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council continues to explore options to address parking constraints in the downtown triangle.

The Los Altos City Council last week held the first of two study sessions to discuss the potential construct...

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Schools

LAHS Science and Technology Week features medical examiner

LAHS Science and Technology Week features medical examiner


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
A Los Altos High School student learns how to use robotic surgical equipment at the school’s Science and Technology Week event last year. Students can also attend hands-on presentations at this year’s event, w...

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Community

Ahoy, matey: Pirate Manor ramps up Halloween display

Ahoy, matey: Pirate Manor ramps up Halloween display


Town Crier File Photo
Pirate Manor is once again scheduled to arrive in the front yard of Dane and Jill Glasgow’s home on Manor Way in Los Altos, just in time for Halloween.

Although not the Walking Dead, pirate skeletons have been brought to li...

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Sports

Lancers rule the pool against Spartans

Lancers rule the pool against Spartans


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Eric Reitmeir launches the ball over Mountain View High driver David Niehaus (2) and goalie Kenny Tang. The host Lancers won Friday’s non-league game 9-3.

There wasn’t a lot on the line Friday when ...

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Comment

Reeder, Fung for El Camino HCD: Editorial

The good news for the El Camino Healthcare District (formerly the El Camino Hospital District, for those still getting used to the new name) is that there is a contested election Nov. 4 for the district’s board of directors. Three candidates are runn...

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Special Sections

Plant-based diet offers benefits

Plant-based diet offers benefits


Photo by Ramya Krishna
Los Altos resident Nandini Krishna prepares a meat-free dish According to author Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr., M.D., a plant-based diet can help prevent cancer.

Shirley Okita of Los Altos has found that adhering to a mostly plant...

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Business

New shop offers haute couture for girls

New shop offers haute couture for girls


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Girls @ Los Altos at 239 State St. offers clothing lines such as Nellystella as well as toys and other items for girls.

Cecilia Chen opened The Girls @ Los Altos as a tribute to the party dress. Whether it’s for...

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Books

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Mimi Sommers, who works at a Los Altos dentist’s office, recently wrote a children’s book.

A local dental hygienist recently published a book that aims to ease parents and children during a sometimes anxious e...

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People

BARBARA DARLING MERIDETH

1946-2014

Born in Palo Alto, raised in Los Altos, retired in southern Oregon. Survived by Peter James Merideth, sons Matthew, Jacob and John Merideth, the loves of her life.

She was a housewife who took great pride in her home, her surroundings and...

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Travel

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors


Courtesy of Castello di Amorosa
Castello di Amorosa in Calistoga, above, boasts a beautiful setting for viewing fall’s colors – and sampling the vineyard’s wines.

Yes, Virginia, there is fall in California.

The colors pop out in...

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Stepping Out

'Sleepy Hollow' awakens at Bus Barn

'Sleepy Hollow' awakens at Bus Barn



Los Altos Youth Theatre’s production of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” a musical based on Washington Irving’s classic story, is set to run through Nov. 2 at Bus Barn Theater. The cast comprises 27 young actors, directed by Cindy Powell. Courtesy o...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

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Prevent prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

You could be on the fast track to diabetes and don’t even know it. Prediabetes and the related metabolic syndrome may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but they do put you on the path to Type 2 diabetes and its complications: heart attacks and strokes, nerve damage, vision loss, kidney failure and more.

Chances are good that you or someone you know has one or all of these conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that as many as 80 million American adults have impaired glucose (blood sugar) control that signals prediabetes. Almost as many more have metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that are harbingers of diabetes. These diseases are often silent and go untreated until the symptoms of actual diabetes appear.

The digestive system turns carbohydrates into blood glucose. As this glucose rises, the pancreas releases insulin, which allows glucose to move out of the blood stream into the muscle cells and be burned, along with oxygen, to produce energy. When insulin resistance develops, the system is impaired, ultimately leading to Type 2 diabetes.

If your fasting blood glucose is 100 to 125 mg/dl, chances are you’ve got prediabetes. Metabolic syndrome, not a disease in itself, is a constellation of conditions, usually related to obesity. If you’ve got any three of these – a waist larger than 35 inches for women or 39 inches for men, blood pressure higher than 129/84, high blood sugar or insulin resistance, high triglycerides or low good cholesterol (HDL under 50) – you’ve got metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance means that your body does not use the hormone insulin as effectively as it should, especially in the muscles and liver.

The good news is that both prediabetes and metabolic syndrome can be stopped in their tracks with simple lifestyle changes, most notably diet, weight-loss and exercise. You are not doomed to become diabetic. Explore the resources at Stanford Health Library to learn more about these conditions and ways to control their effects.

A good place to start is the ever-popular “Dummies” series. “Prediabetes for Dummies” (Wiley, 2009) by Alan L. Rubin, M.D., is a great primer for people who want to learn about the condition and how to beat it. It is a highly palatable book, written in plain English. It tackles a serious topic in a light, friendly way. Loaded with valuable information for patients of all ages, the book explains causes and treatment of prediabetes and offers suggestions for diet and exercise.

The book includes a week-by-week plan to help readers become healthier in three months and an excellent chapter on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to prediabetes.

No “Dummies” book would be complete without a section of “Tens,” summarizing the book’s main points in easy-to-follow lists. These include “Ten Myths about Prediabetes,” “Ten Staples to Keep in Your Kitchen” and “Ten Things to Teach Your Prediabetic Child.”

Another excellent resource focused on diet in prediabetes is available as an electronic book from the Stanford Health Library website. “Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes: A Mindful Eating Program for Thriving with Prediabetes or Diabetes” (New Harbinger, 2012) by Michelle May, M.D., can be found online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/ebooks.html. Follow the instructions for entering the user name and password, then search for the title or enter “prediabetes” in the search box.

The seminal work on the metabolic syndrome is “Syndrome X, The Silent Killer: The New Heart Disease Risk” (Simon & Schuster, 2000) by Stanford University’s Gerald Reaven, M.D. “Syndrome X” is another term for metabolic syndrome. Although the book was published 13 years ago, it remains a classic and offers helpful information supported by excellent documentation.

A new book at Stanford Health Library, “Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) by authors T. Barry Levine and Arlene Bradley Levine focuses on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to heart disease. Written for clinicians, the authors carefully explain the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and offer rationale for effective interventions. There is an interesting discussion on the importance of sleep, in addition to the roles caloric restriction and bariatric surgery play in controlling the syndrome.

There are many more resources at Stanford Health Library, where research assistance and information packets are available free of charge. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/endocrine_diabetes.html#pre.

Stanford Health Library is now located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. The library is free and open to the public 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Access is also available on the third floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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