Sat04182015

News

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Car breaks through glass door, closes Trader Joe’s for the day

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Trader Joe's employees survey the damage after a car smashed through the glass doorway earlier today.

Trader Joe’s on Homestead Road is closed for the remainder of the day (April 17) after a car barreled through the glas...

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Schools

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism

Pinewood student writes book about living with autism


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Pinewood School senior Georgia Lyon wrote and illustrated “How to Be Human: Diary of an Autistic Girl” in 2013.

Although first published under a pseudonym, Pinewood School student Georgia Lyon is stepping out to ...

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Community

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Sale offers opportunity to 'discover' jewels, fight cancer

Volunteers and staff at the American Cancer Society's Discovery Shop in downtown Los Altos urge shoppers to "Be A Gem, Buy A Jewel" during the shop's special sale this Friday (April 17) and Saturday (April 18).

The sale is an opportunity to find Mot...

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Comment

Editorial: Let's assume not to presume

Two recent downtown Los Altos stories offer lessons in the drawbacks of jumping to conclusions.

A few months back, the Town Crier published an article on Ladera Autoworks on First Street closing its doors. That part was true, but the reason was not....

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos

Steinway gallery brings pianos, musicians to downtown Los Altos


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Chrissy Huang, manager of Steinway Piano Gallery in Los Altos, showcases Steinway & Sons’ signature instruments. The gallery plans to host concerts with performers tickling the ivories.

A new downtown Los Altos bus...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

GREG STAHLER

GREG STAHLER

Greg Stahler died unexpecdly in his home in Belmont on March 26, 2015. (He was born in Mountain View on June 23, 1972). He will really be missed by three beautiful young children, Haley 7, Hannah 5, and Tyler 3, and his wife Kathryn. He will also b...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View

'Those Darn Squirrels' invading Mountain View


Courtesy of Lyn Flaim Healy/ Spotlight Moments Photography
Noelle Merino stars in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Those Darn Squirrels.”

The Peninsula Youth Theatre’s world premiere adaptation of “Those Darn Squirrels” is scheduled Friday and Saturda...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures

Home for disabled youth yields greener pastures


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Green Pastures staff member JP Mercada, below right, helps Tommy, who lives at the group home, sort through papers and organize his room.

Tucked in the corner of a quiet residential cul-de-sac in Mountain View, Green Pastur...

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Prevent prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

You could be on the fast track to diabetes and don’t even know it. Prediabetes and the related metabolic syndrome may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but they do put you on the path to Type 2 diabetes and its complications: heart attacks and strokes, nerve damage, vision loss, kidney failure and more.

Chances are good that you or someone you know has one or all of these conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that as many as 80 million American adults have impaired glucose (blood sugar) control that signals prediabetes. Almost as many more have metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that are harbingers of diabetes. These diseases are often silent and go untreated until the symptoms of actual diabetes appear.

The digestive system turns carbohydrates into blood glucose. As this glucose rises, the pancreas releases insulin, which allows glucose to move out of the blood stream into the muscle cells and be burned, along with oxygen, to produce energy. When insulin resistance develops, the system is impaired, ultimately leading to Type 2 diabetes.

If your fasting blood glucose is 100 to 125 mg/dl, chances are you’ve got prediabetes. Metabolic syndrome, not a disease in itself, is a constellation of conditions, usually related to obesity. If you’ve got any three of these – a waist larger than 35 inches for women or 39 inches for men, blood pressure higher than 129/84, high blood sugar or insulin resistance, high triglycerides or low good cholesterol (HDL under 50) – you’ve got metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance means that your body does not use the hormone insulin as effectively as it should, especially in the muscles and liver.

The good news is that both prediabetes and metabolic syndrome can be stopped in their tracks with simple lifestyle changes, most notably diet, weight-loss and exercise. You are not doomed to become diabetic. Explore the resources at Stanford Health Library to learn more about these conditions and ways to control their effects.

A good place to start is the ever-popular “Dummies” series. “Prediabetes for Dummies” (Wiley, 2009) by Alan L. Rubin, M.D., is a great primer for people who want to learn about the condition and how to beat it. It is a highly palatable book, written in plain English. It tackles a serious topic in a light, friendly way. Loaded with valuable information for patients of all ages, the book explains causes and treatment of prediabetes and offers suggestions for diet and exercise.

The book includes a week-by-week plan to help readers become healthier in three months and an excellent chapter on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to prediabetes.

No “Dummies” book would be complete without a section of “Tens,” summarizing the book’s main points in easy-to-follow lists. These include “Ten Myths about Prediabetes,” “Ten Staples to Keep in Your Kitchen” and “Ten Things to Teach Your Prediabetic Child.”

Another excellent resource focused on diet in prediabetes is available as an electronic book from the Stanford Health Library website. “Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes: A Mindful Eating Program for Thriving with Prediabetes or Diabetes” (New Harbinger, 2012) by Michelle May, M.D., can be found online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/ebooks.html. Follow the instructions for entering the user name and password, then search for the title or enter “prediabetes” in the search box.

The seminal work on the metabolic syndrome is “Syndrome X, The Silent Killer: The New Heart Disease Risk” (Simon & Schuster, 2000) by Stanford University’s Gerald Reaven, M.D. “Syndrome X” is another term for metabolic syndrome. Although the book was published 13 years ago, it remains a classic and offers helpful information supported by excellent documentation.

A new book at Stanford Health Library, “Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) by authors T. Barry Levine and Arlene Bradley Levine focuses on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to heart disease. Written for clinicians, the authors carefully explain the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and offer rationale for effective interventions. There is an interesting discussion on the importance of sleep, in addition to the roles caloric restriction and bariatric surgery play in controlling the syndrome.

There are many more resources at Stanford Health Library, where research assistance and information packets are available free of charge. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/endocrine_diabetes.html#pre.

Stanford Health Library is now located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. The library is free and open to the public 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Access is also available on the third floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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