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News

LA council votes to delay community center update

LA council votes to delay community center update


Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council voted to delay adoption of a community center conceptual design plan last week. The plan includes elements from a design charette held earlier this fall, left.

The Los Altos City Council last...

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Schools

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
During a Science is Learning geology lesson, Theuerkauf Elementary School students learn about igneous rocks by observing how sugar changes form when heated.

Hundreds of local elementary students perform experiments w...

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Community

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
PYT’s “Oklahoma!” features, from left, David Peters of Mountain View, Jenna Levere of Los Altos and Kai Wessel of Mountain View.

Time is running out to catch Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Oklahoma!”...

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Sports

Eagles advance

Eagles advance


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High’s Carmen Annevelink, left, and Kristen Liu put up a block against Mountain View. Annevelink totaled 20 kills.

Mountain View High’s out-of-the-gate energy could last for only so long against rival and he...

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Comment

Coping with addictions: Haugh About That?

Preparing to deal with my lifelong addiction, I stood in front of the mirror ready to confess the shame I’d been hiding. The first step to healing, I reminded myself, is to admit something is wrong.

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Special Sections

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One


Bruce Barton/Town Crier
Hangar One, pictured here last January, will be restored under an agreement between Google and NASA.

NASA and Google Inc. forged an agreement last week that allows Google to lease a portion of NASA’s historic Moffett Fede...

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Business

State Street science center closing Nov. 30

State Street science center closing Nov. 30


Ellie Van Houtte/
Helix at 316 State St. is closing after the completion of a one-year grant from Passerelle Investment Co. The science center became a popular destination because of its various exhibits. Town Crier

A popular downtown destination...

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Books

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree


Author Tiffany Papageorge is scheduled to sign copies of new her book 11 a.m. Dec. 6 at Linden Tree Books, 265 State St., Los Altos.

Papageorge’s “My Yellow Balloon” (Minoan Moon, 2014) is a Mom’s Choice “Gold” winner. In the book, the Los Gat...

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People

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

January 11, 1939 – November 6, 2014
Resident of Mountain View

James Windell Smith, a 40 year resident of Los Altos, passed away from complications after a post-surgery stroke November 6th, 2014 in Los Gatos, California.

Born on January 11, 1939 on...

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Travel

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
While many day-trippers may think that Sonoma is all about the grapes, the region boasts other delights. Try a biplane ride over the patchwork landscape.

Sonoma, a scenic two-hour drive from Los Altos, boa...

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Stepping Out

LA Stage Company opens 'Fairway'

The Los Altos Stage Company production of Ken Ludwig’s new comedy “The Fox on the Fairway” is slated to run Thursday through Dec. 14 at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

A tribute to the English farces of the 1930s and 1940s, “Fox” is a romp that p...

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Spiritual Life

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am


The Beth Am Women have scheduled “A Conversation with Author Maggie Anton” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at Congregation Beth Am, 26790 Arastradero Road, Los Altos Hills.

Anton, winner of the 2012 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction, will discu...

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Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

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Prevent prediabetes and metabolic syndrome

You could be on the fast track to diabetes and don’t even know it. Prediabetes and the related metabolic syndrome may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but they do put you on the path to Type 2 diabetes and its complications: heart attacks and strokes, nerve damage, vision loss, kidney failure and more.

Chances are good that you or someone you know has one or all of these conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that as many as 80 million American adults have impaired glucose (blood sugar) control that signals prediabetes. Almost as many more have metabolic syndrome, a group of conditions that are harbingers of diabetes. These diseases are often silent and go untreated until the symptoms of actual diabetes appear.

The digestive system turns carbohydrates into blood glucose. As this glucose rises, the pancreas releases insulin, which allows glucose to move out of the blood stream into the muscle cells and be burned, along with oxygen, to produce energy. When insulin resistance develops, the system is impaired, ultimately leading to Type 2 diabetes.

If your fasting blood glucose is 100 to 125 mg/dl, chances are you’ve got prediabetes. Metabolic syndrome, not a disease in itself, is a constellation of conditions, usually related to obesity. If you’ve got any three of these – a waist larger than 35 inches for women or 39 inches for men, blood pressure higher than 129/84, high blood sugar or insulin resistance, high triglycerides or low good cholesterol (HDL under 50) – you’ve got metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance means that your body does not use the hormone insulin as effectively as it should, especially in the muscles and liver.

The good news is that both prediabetes and metabolic syndrome can be stopped in their tracks with simple lifestyle changes, most notably diet, weight-loss and exercise. You are not doomed to become diabetic. Explore the resources at Stanford Health Library to learn more about these conditions and ways to control their effects.

A good place to start is the ever-popular “Dummies” series. “Prediabetes for Dummies” (Wiley, 2009) by Alan L. Rubin, M.D., is a great primer for people who want to learn about the condition and how to beat it. It is a highly palatable book, written in plain English. It tackles a serious topic in a light, friendly way. Loaded with valuable information for patients of all ages, the book explains causes and treatment of prediabetes and offers suggestions for diet and exercise.

The book includes a week-by-week plan to help readers become healthier in three months and an excellent chapter on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to prediabetes.

No “Dummies” book would be complete without a section of “Tens,” summarizing the book’s main points in easy-to-follow lists. These include “Ten Myths about Prediabetes,” “Ten Staples to Keep in Your Kitchen” and “Ten Things to Teach Your Prediabetic Child.”

Another excellent resource focused on diet in prediabetes is available as an electronic book from the Stanford Health Library website. “Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat with Diabetes: A Mindful Eating Program for Thriving with Prediabetes or Diabetes” (New Harbinger, 2012) by Michelle May, M.D., can be found online at healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/ebooks.html. Follow the instructions for entering the user name and password, then search for the title or enter “prediabetes” in the search box.

The seminal work on the metabolic syndrome is “Syndrome X, The Silent Killer: The New Heart Disease Risk” (Simon & Schuster, 2000) by Stanford University’s Gerald Reaven, M.D. “Syndrome X” is another term for metabolic syndrome. Although the book was published 13 years ago, it remains a classic and offers helpful information supported by excellent documentation.

A new book at Stanford Health Library, “Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Disease” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012) by authors T. Barry Levine and Arlene Bradley Levine focuses on metabolic syndrome and its relationship to heart disease. Written for clinicians, the authors carefully explain the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and offer rationale for effective interventions. There is an interesting discussion on the importance of sleep, in addition to the roles caloric restriction and bariatric surgery play in controlling the syndrome.

There are many more resources at Stanford Health Library, where research assistance and information packets are available free of charge. For more information, visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu/resources/bodysystems/endocrine_diabetes.html#pre.

Stanford Health Library is now located in Hoover Pavilion, 211 Quarry Road, Suite 201. The library is free and open to the public 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Access is also available on the third floor of Stanford Hospital and on the main level of Stanford’s Cancer Center.

Nancy Dickenson is head librarian at Stanford Health Library. For more information, call 725-8400, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit healthlibrary.stanford.edu.

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