Tue02092016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Gala raises $266,000 for South Asian Heart Center


Photo By: Courtesy of MP Singh Photography
Photo Courtesy Of Mp Singh Photography

Los Altos residents, from left, Priya Dharan, Ashish Mathur, Poornima Kumar and Nimish Mehta attend El Camino Hospital’s South Asian Heart Center’s “Scarlet Night” fundraiser.

El Camino Hospital’s South Asian Heart Center raised $266,000 at its sixth annual “Scarlet Night” fundraiser, held March 9 at the Santa Clara Convention Center.

The funds will support the center’s programs and services to reduce the risk of heart disease among South Asians, who are more than four times at risk of getting heart disease than the general population.

The center has screened more than 4,000 participants, case-managed 1,600 high-risk individuals for more than a year, created a Bay Area network of more than 300 referring physicians and trained 800 physicians on methods for early diagnosis, comprehensive evaluation and lifestyle changes.

“We are incredibly grateful for the overwhelming support from the community to help us raise valuable awareness and funds to support the center’s ongoing work,” said Ashish Mathur, executive director of the center. “We are here to provide education and resources to address one of the greatest health crises facing our community today, and hopefully serve as a model of comprehensive, culturally appropriate care for other communities across the country and the world.”

Personal perspectives

The gala featured master of ceremonies Raj Mathai of NBC Bay Area, a performance by the Mona Khan Dance Company and personal testimonies from those affected by heart disease.

Columbia Business School professor and keynote speaker Dr. Sheena Iyengar shared her story.

“I waited 30 years to tell this story,” Iyengar said to the standing-room-only audience at the primary fundraising event for the South Asian Heart Center.

Iyengar recalled the day her father collapsed and died after suffering three consecutive heart attacks. She was 13 – and he was just 43.

Iyengar’s emotional story included everyday details: a morning confrontation between the teenage girl and her father over her academic and after-school activities and seemingly coincidental choices that led to delays before he reached the emergency department.

She revealed additional details that led to her father’s untimely death, including an earlier mix-up with a doctor’s appointment that prevented an early diagnosis of a blood clot that led to the heart attacks. She said dozens of small choices that day and in the months and years before led to that fateful event.

“Did he die by accident?” she questioned. “Was it fate, chance or choice? Which one is more right or true? He knew from his early 30s that he had high blood pressure and cholesterol.”

Iyengar allowed that more exercise and a better diet could have changed things.

“My father made some pretty bad choices – small choices – and I wondered if he might have lived had these choices been different,” she said.

Iyengar’s story struck a chord with organizers and attendees alike.

“As a South Asian, I don’t think you could listen to that speech and not apply it to your own life and experiences,” said Nimish Mehta, co-chairman of the gala. “As South Asians, we sometimes cling to the belief that our fates are predetermined, and we personally have little control. But every day we make choices. Once we accept that, as Dr. Iyengar said, we never go back, we only go forward, and at the very least we can avoid making the same mistakes we made yesterday.”

El Camino Hospital CEO Tomi Ryba capped off the evening by challenging women in the audience to take care of themselves.

“You put the health of others first,” she said. “I challenge you to make the phone call to the South Asian Heart Center now. The leading cause of death for women is heart disease.”

Funds raised are spent on prevention (63.3 percent), outreach (11.2 percent), research (8.3 percent) and education (7.3 percent). Less than 10 percent of the center’s total revenue is spent on general, administrative and fundraising expenses.

For more information, visit www.southasianheartcenter.org.

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