Sat04302016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

Gala raises $266,000 for South Asian Heart Center


Photo By: Courtesy of MP Singh Photography
Photo Courtesy Of Mp Singh Photography

Los Altos residents, from left, Priya Dharan, Ashish Mathur, Poornima Kumar and Nimish Mehta attend El Camino Hospital’s South Asian Heart Center’s “Scarlet Night” fundraiser.

El Camino Hospital’s South Asian Heart Center raised $266,000 at its sixth annual “Scarlet Night” fundraiser, held March 9 at the Santa Clara Convention Center.

The funds will support the center’s programs and services to reduce the risk of heart disease among South Asians, who are more than four times at risk of getting heart disease than the general population.

The center has screened more than 4,000 participants, case-managed 1,600 high-risk individuals for more than a year, created a Bay Area network of more than 300 referring physicians and trained 800 physicians on methods for early diagnosis, comprehensive evaluation and lifestyle changes.

“We are incredibly grateful for the overwhelming support from the community to help us raise valuable awareness and funds to support the center’s ongoing work,” said Ashish Mathur, executive director of the center. “We are here to provide education and resources to address one of the greatest health crises facing our community today, and hopefully serve as a model of comprehensive, culturally appropriate care for other communities across the country and the world.”

Personal perspectives

The gala featured master of ceremonies Raj Mathai of NBC Bay Area, a performance by the Mona Khan Dance Company and personal testimonies from those affected by heart disease.

Columbia Business School professor and keynote speaker Dr. Sheena Iyengar shared her story.

“I waited 30 years to tell this story,” Iyengar said to the standing-room-only audience at the primary fundraising event for the South Asian Heart Center.

Iyengar recalled the day her father collapsed and died after suffering three consecutive heart attacks. She was 13 – and he was just 43.

Iyengar’s emotional story included everyday details: a morning confrontation between the teenage girl and her father over her academic and after-school activities and seemingly coincidental choices that led to delays before he reached the emergency department.

She revealed additional details that led to her father’s untimely death, including an earlier mix-up with a doctor’s appointment that prevented an early diagnosis of a blood clot that led to the heart attacks. She said dozens of small choices that day and in the months and years before led to that fateful event.

“Did he die by accident?” she questioned. “Was it fate, chance or choice? Which one is more right or true? He knew from his early 30s that he had high blood pressure and cholesterol.”

Iyengar allowed that more exercise and a better diet could have changed things.

“My father made some pretty bad choices – small choices – and I wondered if he might have lived had these choices been different,” she said.

Iyengar’s story struck a chord with organizers and attendees alike.

“As a South Asian, I don’t think you could listen to that speech and not apply it to your own life and experiences,” said Nimish Mehta, co-chairman of the gala. “As South Asians, we sometimes cling to the belief that our fates are predetermined, and we personally have little control. But every day we make choices. Once we accept that, as Dr. Iyengar said, we never go back, we only go forward, and at the very least we can avoid making the same mistakes we made yesterday.”

El Camino Hospital CEO Tomi Ryba capped off the evening by challenging women in the audience to take care of themselves.

“You put the health of others first,” she said. “I challenge you to make the phone call to the South Asian Heart Center now. The leading cause of death for women is heart disease.”

Funds raised are spent on prevention (63.3 percent), outreach (11.2 percent), research (8.3 percent) and education (7.3 percent). Less than 10 percent of the center’s total revenue is spent on general, administrative and fundraising expenses.

For more information, visit www.southasianheartcenter.org.

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