Sun04202014

News

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council earmarked $7,000 for the purchase of Chris Johanson’s artwork.

The city of Los Altos will contribute $7,000 toward the purchase of a $28,000 art installation featured in the San Francisco Museum...

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Schools

LASD students celebrate service learning

LASD students celebrate service learning


Courtesy of Sandra McGonagle
We Day, held March 26 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, exhorts students in the Los Altos School District to effect positive change.

More than 150 Los Altos School District student leaders joined 16,000 Bay Area students to ce...

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Community

Film career launches with Cannes screening

Film career launches with Cannes screening


Courtesy of Zachary Ready
Los Altos native Zachary Ready, front left, and co-director Andrew Cathey, right, celebrate their Campus MovieFest awards.

After learning the art of filmmaking as a child in the front yard of his family’s Los Altos home...

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Sports

Sports on the Side

Pathways Run/Walk slated May 10 in Hills

The 13th annual Pathways Run/Walk is scheduled 9 a.m. May 10 at Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. The course wends through Byrne Preserve and onto the Los Altos Hills Pathways sys...

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Comment

Now is the time to expand parking: Editorial

Just a few short years ago, vacancies dotted downtown Los Altos. Property owners had a hard time attracting businesses because there was a shortage of customers. That is no longer true. Now, the cry is: Where are my customers going to park?

The city...

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Special Sections

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability


Courtesy of Michael McTighe
Mary Clark Bartlett is founder and CEO of Los Altos-based Epicurean Group.

Labels such as “healthy,” “organic” and “green” are rarely used to describe the meals served in most corporate cafes in Silicon Valley. But on...

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Business

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Coldwell Banker recently recognized realtor Kim Copher, right, for her philanthropic efforts. Copher and colleague Alan Russell, left, volunteer at Reach Potential Movement, where they collect books for its Bookshelf in ...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthy

RotaCare honors local volunteer

RotaCare Bay Area honored Jim Cochran of the RotaCare Mountain View Free Medical Clinic with the Outstanding Clinic Volunteer Award April 10 for his commitment to RotaCare’s mission of providing free medical care to t...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

Western Ballet performs this weekend  at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills

Western Ballet performs this weekend at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills


Courtesy of Alexi Zubiria
Western Ballet’s “La Fille Mal Gardée” features Alison Share and Maykel Solas. The production runs Friday and Saturday at Foothill College

Western Ballet is slated to perform “La Fille Mal GardéeR...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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Experts address state education reform at Mtn. View forum


Photo By: Bruce Barton/Town Crier
Photo Bruce Barton/Town Crier

Experts in education, from left, Terry Moe, Dean Vogel, Gloria Romero and Larry Sand addressed “How to Improve Education in California” at a Conservative Forum of Silicon Valley meeting in Mountain View last week.

Four experts on California education offered four distinctly different views on the subject at a March 5 meeting of the Conservative Forum of Silicon Valley in Mountain View.

Guest speakers Larry Sand, Gloria Romero, Terry Moe and Dean Vogel addressed “How to Improve Education in California.”

Sand, a retired teacher and founder of the California Teachers Empowerment Network, said parents should choose where their children go to school. Romero, state director of Democrats for Education Reform and a former Los Angeles-based state senator, favors more parental choice in determining how schools are run. Moe, a Stanford professor and Hoover Institution Senior Fellow, sees the future of education completely directed by technology. Vogel, current president of the California Teachers Association, would encourage more parental involvement, but within the confines of the current system.

Sand said the teacher tenure system currently in place makes it nearly impossible to fire bad teachers, enabling a dysfunctional system that prioritizes faculty employment over children’s education.

“This is no way to run a school system,” he said, noting that “throwing money” at education has not improved it. Sand said 90 percent of students attending city or community colleges are taking remedial courses because they failed to learn subjects adequately during high school.

In addition to holding teachers to performance-based reviews, Sand suggested that parents select their children’s schools like diners choose their preferred restaurants.

“Parents should not be forced to send students to the closest school,” he said.

Charter schools, not bound by nearly as many state regulations, have improved traditional public schools through competition, Sand added.

“If (charter schools) don’t do the job, they close – unlike public schools,” he said.

Romero saw firsthand how neglected schools in poor neighborhoods produced dropouts, many of whom became criminals now clogging the state’s prison system. She noted that 70 percent of the state’s inmates do not have high school diplomas.

“We spend more to incarcerate than to educate,” she said. “If we do not educate, we will incarcerate.”

Romero gained attention as a state senator when she introduced a “trigger law” that empowered parents with the right to have a say in restructuring a school if it fails to perform to a certain level, contending that the state is “lacking a sense of urgency” about reform.

“The Ed Code has too many obstacles and barriers,” she said. “The rules favor the adults.”

Romero drew applause when she suggested those opposed to reform “get the hell out of the way and give the power to the parents.”

Empty talk about improving state education has been going on for 30 years with little progress, according to Moe. But the current way of doing things, he said, will soon be replaced by the technological revolution.

“It’s going to revolutionize K-12,” he said. “This is the tsunami that is too big for anyone to stop.”

Software programs and computers provide an inexpensive and more effective way to teach children, according to Moe. Students can learn at their own pace, with personalized programs tailored to their needs.

“The computer doesn’t care whether you’re white or black or living in Detroit,” he said. “You can have the best (online education) of what’s available.”

The education paradigm, Moe said, is shifting from a teacher in front of a classroom to online classes available to anyone, anywhere. He pointed to 275,000 students currently learning in “virtual charter schools” all over the country.

Vogel said he was not speaking as a representative of a teacher’s union but for all classroom teachers.

“If you want kids to be successful, you have to have a quality teacher in front of them,” said Vogel, a kindergarten teacher from Vacaville. “Otherwise, you’re in trouble.”

He encouraged parent involvement and said dialogue between parents and teachers was vital to a child’s education.

Vogel suggested that improvements to the education system have been hampered by debates over direction and people placing blame on one another.

“We have spent time trying to discredit each other instead of working on the problem,” he said.

Addressing the contention by other panelists that increased funding has not improved education, Vogel pointed to state-mandated class-size limits of 20 students in K-3 that could not have been implemented without the necessary funding.

For more information, visit www.theconservativeforum.com.

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