Mon04272015

News

LAH resident killed in cycling accident

LAH resident killed in cycling accident

A longtime Los Altos Hills resident and philanthropist struck by a bicyclist Monday (April 20) while walking along Page Mill Road has died from the injuries she sustained.

Kathryn Green, 61, died a day after the accident, according to the Santa Clar...

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Schools

LASD Junior Olympics scheduled Saturday

LASD Junior Olympics scheduled Saturday


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos School District Junior Olympics are slated Saturday at Mountain View High School. District officials say the opening ceremonies, above, are always memorable.

Los Altos School District fourth- through sixth-grader...

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Community

Altruism, adventure in Africa: Los Altos couple relates experiences in new book

Altruism, adventure in Africa: Los Altos couple relates experiences in new book


Courtesy of Wendy Walleigh
Rick and Wendy Walleigh spent a year and a half in Swaziland and Kenya.

Los Altos residents Rick and Wendy Walleigh experienced long, successful high-tech careers. But retirement? No, it was time for an encore.

Leavin...

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Sports

Workout warriors

Workout warriors


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High gymnast Jessica Nelson soars by coach Youlee Lee during practice last week. Lee is a 2005 Los Altos High grad.

Some coaches would like to see their athletes work harder. Youlee Lee has the opposite problem ...

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Comment

Ending the debate: No Shoes, Please

In a general sense, everything is up for debate with me: What do I cook for dinner? Did I do the right thing? What color paint for the bedroom? Do I really want to go? Has the team improved? What difference does it make? Should I give him a call? Is...

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Special Sections

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters

Fitness focus: No holds barred for Los Altos sisters


Photos Courtesy of Barre 3
Gillian Brotherson, kneeling at left, guides studio instructors through a workout at barre3 Los Altos.

Health is all about balance. That’s what two Los Altos natives learned as they navigated work, motherhood and welln...

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Business

Physical therapist brings business background to new Los Altos clinic

Physical therapist brings business background to new Los Altos clinic

Courtesy of Eliza Snow
Strive owner Robert Abrams, kneeling, runs a balance test.

With more than a dozen physical therapy clinics in Los Altos, one new business owner streamlined his approach in an effort to set his practice apart.

“I always wan...

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Books

People

CAPTAIN: CHARLES THOMAS MINOR

CAPTAIN: CHARLES THOMAS MINOR

Age 96

December 7, 1918  - March 28, 2015 

Chuck passed away peacefully in the home he built in Los Altos surrounded by his beautiful wife of 69 years, Bonnie, his two sons and their spouses, David Minor & Caryn Joe Pulliam; Steve &...

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Travel

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers

Cuba libre: Local residents join mad rush of travelers


Natalie Elefant/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident Natalie Elefant noted the vibrant street performances as a traveler in Cuba.

The U.S. restored diplomatic relations with Cuba late last year, enabling Americans to import $100 worth of cig...

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Stepping Out

Stage fright

Stage fright


Joyce Goldschmid/Special to the Town Crier
“The Addams Family” stars, from left, Betsy Kruse Craig (as Morticia), Joey McDaniel (Uncle Fester) and Doug Santana (Gomez).

The Palo Alto Players production of “The Addams Family”...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Inside Mountain View

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth

Up to the challenge: Local leaders unite to help at-risk youth


Courtesy of Challenge Team
Jeanette Freiberg, bottom of pile, has fun with family members. The Challenge Team named Freiberg, a student at Mountain View High School, its 2015 Youth Champion.

There’s an ongoing joke among members of the Challenge...

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Experts address state education reform at Mtn. View forum


Photo By: Bruce Barton/Town Crier
Photo Bruce Barton/Town Crier

Experts in education, from left, Terry Moe, Dean Vogel, Gloria Romero and Larry Sand addressed “How to Improve Education in California” at a Conservative Forum of Silicon Valley meeting in Mountain View last week.

Four experts on California education offered four distinctly different views on the subject at a March 5 meeting of the Conservative Forum of Silicon Valley in Mountain View.

Guest speakers Larry Sand, Gloria Romero, Terry Moe and Dean Vogel addressed “How to Improve Education in California.”

Sand, a retired teacher and founder of the California Teachers Empowerment Network, said parents should choose where their children go to school. Romero, state director of Democrats for Education Reform and a former Los Angeles-based state senator, favors more parental choice in determining how schools are run. Moe, a Stanford professor and Hoover Institution Senior Fellow, sees the future of education completely directed by technology. Vogel, current president of the California Teachers Association, would encourage more parental involvement, but within the confines of the current system.

Sand said the teacher tenure system currently in place makes it nearly impossible to fire bad teachers, enabling a dysfunctional system that prioritizes faculty employment over children’s education.

“This is no way to run a school system,” he said, noting that “throwing money” at education has not improved it. Sand said 90 percent of students attending city or community colleges are taking remedial courses because they failed to learn subjects adequately during high school.

In addition to holding teachers to performance-based reviews, Sand suggested that parents select their children’s schools like diners choose their preferred restaurants.

“Parents should not be forced to send students to the closest school,” he said.

Charter schools, not bound by nearly as many state regulations, have improved traditional public schools through competition, Sand added.

“If (charter schools) don’t do the job, they close – unlike public schools,” he said.

Romero saw firsthand how neglected schools in poor neighborhoods produced dropouts, many of whom became criminals now clogging the state’s prison system. She noted that 70 percent of the state’s inmates do not have high school diplomas.

“We spend more to incarcerate than to educate,” she said. “If we do not educate, we will incarcerate.”

Romero gained attention as a state senator when she introduced a “trigger law” that empowered parents with the right to have a say in restructuring a school if it fails to perform to a certain level, contending that the state is “lacking a sense of urgency” about reform.

“The Ed Code has too many obstacles and barriers,” she said. “The rules favor the adults.”

Romero drew applause when she suggested those opposed to reform “get the hell out of the way and give the power to the parents.”

Empty talk about improving state education has been going on for 30 years with little progress, according to Moe. But the current way of doing things, he said, will soon be replaced by the technological revolution.

“It’s going to revolutionize K-12,” he said. “This is the tsunami that is too big for anyone to stop.”

Software programs and computers provide an inexpensive and more effective way to teach children, according to Moe. Students can learn at their own pace, with personalized programs tailored to their needs.

“The computer doesn’t care whether you’re white or black or living in Detroit,” he said. “You can have the best (online education) of what’s available.”

The education paradigm, Moe said, is shifting from a teacher in front of a classroom to online classes available to anyone, anywhere. He pointed to 275,000 students currently learning in “virtual charter schools” all over the country.

Vogel said he was not speaking as a representative of a teacher’s union but for all classroom teachers.

“If you want kids to be successful, you have to have a quality teacher in front of them,” said Vogel, a kindergarten teacher from Vacaville. “Otherwise, you’re in trouble.”

He encouraged parent involvement and said dialogue between parents and teachers was vital to a child’s education.

Vogel suggested that improvements to the education system have been hampered by debates over direction and people placing blame on one another.

“We have spent time trying to discredit each other instead of working on the problem,” he said.

Addressing the contention by other panelists that increased funding has not improved education, Vogel pointed to state-mandated class-size limits of 20 students in K-3 that could not have been implemented without the necessary funding.

For more information, visit www.theconservativeforum.com.

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