Wed01282015

News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

"Fearless Genius" photos chart Silicon Valleys brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photographs Menuez to...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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The fountain of youth: How to look your age or younger

As human beings, we’re on a constant quest for the fountain of youth. So far we haven’t figured out how to reverse the aging process, but there are ways we can slow it down and maintain our energy, vitality and health as we approach our golden years.

We know exercise and a healthful diet can help prevent diseases and age-related complications. Now we also understand more about a chemical marker for aging that, true to this topic, is called Advanced Glycation End (AGE).

Glycation is the process by which sugar is added to proteins. Proteins drive important biochemical reactions in our bodies, and they’re the building blocks for our muscles, blood vessels and organs. Proteins also form collagen, which maintains our cartilage, bone and skin. When collagen starts breaking down, we look older as our skin starts to wrinkle, and we feel older as the cartilage wears away in our joints and causes arthritis.

When sugar, or glucose, exists in normal amounts in our bloodstream, it interacts harmlessly with life-sustaining proteins. However, when sugar levels are excessive, glucose latches onto proteins and prevents them from carrying out their normal functions.

AGEs are basically dysfunctional glucose-protein complexes that result from too much sugar in your blood. This is a direct result of the foods you eat. AGEs increase your risk of developing the following health conditions.

• Cancer

• Heart disease and stroke

• Type II diabetes

• Alzheimer’s disease

• Kidney disease

• Atherosclerosis

• High blood pressure

• Visual impairment

• Nerve damage

The bottom line is that eating too much sugar and other foods that raise glucose excessively can accelerate aging. Unfortunately, the low-fat diet craze has introduced processed sugars into virtually every type of food we consume. Foods labeled “healthful” and “low-fat” often have excessive amounts of hidden sugar that trigger AGE production.

Following are some tips on foods to avoid.

• Beware of browning foods and processed brown foods. Foods such as brown cookies and brown beans undergo a caramelizing process that increases sugars. Cooking meats at high temperature (like a broiled or well-done piece of meat) can increase AGEs as well. Try to eat fresh, unprocessed foods and cook low and slow with water whenever you can (steaming, boiling, crockpot cooking, etc.).

• Check labels and steer clear of high-fructose corn syrup.

• Avoid excess sugars, sweets and sodas.

• Watch your total overall consumption of carbohydrates. Even consuming excessive amounts of “healthful” carbs in the form of oatmeal, grains and wheat can increase sugar levels.

• Exercise regularly to increase your metabolism of sugars.

• Try to prepare fresh foods with fresh ingredients; this is the best way to cut back on your AGE intake and slow down the aging process.

Dr. Ronesh Sinha is an internal medicine physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s Los Altos Center. He also provides medical consults to high-risk South Asians.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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