Sat10252014

News

Election flyer mimics newspaper coverage

Election flyer mimics newspaper coverage

A flyer is being distributed across Los Altos that looks like it is from the Los Altos Town Crier but was neither created nor distributed by the community’s weekly newspaper. The flyer, pictured at right, is being distributed by workers from Pyrami...

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Schools

LAHS Science and Technology Week features medical examiner

LAHS Science and Technology Week features medical examiner


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
A Los Altos High School student learns how to use robotic surgical equipment at the school’s Science and Technology Week event last year. Students can also attend hands-on presentations at this year’s event, w...

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Community

Ahoy, matey: Pirate Manor ramps up Halloween display

Ahoy, matey: Pirate Manor ramps up Halloween display


Town Crier File Photo
Pirate Manor is once again scheduled to arrive in the front yard of Dane and Jill Glasgow’s home on Manor Way in Los Altos, just in time for Halloween.

Although not the Walking Dead, pirate skeletons have been brought to li...

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Sports

Lancers rule the pool against Spartans

Lancers rule the pool against Spartans


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Eric Reitmeir launches the ball over Mountain View High driver David Niehaus (2) and goalie Kenny Tang. The host Lancers won Friday’s non-league game 9-3.

There wasn’t a lot on the line Friday when ...

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Comment

Reeder, Fung for El Camino HCD: Editorial

The good news for the El Camino Healthcare District (formerly the El Camino Hospital District, for those still getting used to the new name) is that there is a contested election Nov. 4 for the district’s board of directors. Three candidates are runn...

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Special Sections

Plant-based diet offers benefits

Plant-based diet offers benefits


Photo by Ramya Krishna
Los Altos resident Nandini Krishna prepares a meat-free dish According to author Caldwell B. Esselstyn Jr., M.D., a plant-based diet can help prevent cancer.

Shirley Okita of Los Altos has found that adhering to a mostly plant...

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Business

New shop offers haute couture for girls

New shop offers haute couture for girls


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Girls @ Los Altos at 239 State St. offers clothing lines such as Nellystella as well as toys and other items for girls.

Cecilia Chen opened The Girls @ Los Altos as a tribute to the party dress. Whether it’s for...

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Books

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book

Helping kids catch a few Zs: Local dental hygienist pens meditative bedtime book


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Mimi Sommers, who works at a Los Altos dentist’s office, recently wrote a children’s book.

A local dental hygienist recently published a book that aims to ease parents and children during a sometimes anxious e...

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People

BARBARA DARLING MERIDETH

1946-2014

Born in Palo Alto, raised in Los Altos, retired in southern Oregon. Survived by Peter James Merideth, sons Matthew, Jacob and John Merideth, the loves of her life.

She was a housewife who took great pride in her home, her surroundings and...

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Travel

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors

Falling leaves: Four places in California to see autumn colors


Courtesy of Castello di Amorosa
Castello di Amorosa in Calistoga, above, boasts a beautiful setting for viewing fall’s colors – and sampling the vineyard’s wines.

Yes, Virginia, there is fall in California.

The colors pop out in...

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Stepping Out

'Sleepy Hollow' awakens at Bus Barn

'Sleepy Hollow' awakens at Bus Barn



Los Altos Youth Theatre’s production of “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” a musical based on Washington Irving’s classic story, is set to run through Nov. 2 at Bus Barn Theater. The cast comprises 27 young actors, directed by Cindy Powell. Courtesy o...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

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The fountain of youth: How to look your age or younger

As human beings, we’re on a constant quest for the fountain of youth. So far we haven’t figured out how to reverse the aging process, but there are ways we can slow it down and maintain our energy, vitality and health as we approach our golden years.

We know exercise and a healthful diet can help prevent diseases and age-related complications. Now we also understand more about a chemical marker for aging that, true to this topic, is called Advanced Glycation End (AGE).

Glycation is the process by which sugar is added to proteins. Proteins drive important biochemical reactions in our bodies, and they’re the building blocks for our muscles, blood vessels and organs. Proteins also form collagen, which maintains our cartilage, bone and skin. When collagen starts breaking down, we look older as our skin starts to wrinkle, and we feel older as the cartilage wears away in our joints and causes arthritis.

When sugar, or glucose, exists in normal amounts in our bloodstream, it interacts harmlessly with life-sustaining proteins. However, when sugar levels are excessive, glucose latches onto proteins and prevents them from carrying out their normal functions.

AGEs are basically dysfunctional glucose-protein complexes that result from too much sugar in your blood. This is a direct result of the foods you eat. AGEs increase your risk of developing the following health conditions.

• Cancer

• Heart disease and stroke

• Type II diabetes

• Alzheimer’s disease

• Kidney disease

• Atherosclerosis

• High blood pressure

• Visual impairment

• Nerve damage

The bottom line is that eating too much sugar and other foods that raise glucose excessively can accelerate aging. Unfortunately, the low-fat diet craze has introduced processed sugars into virtually every type of food we consume. Foods labeled “healthful” and “low-fat” often have excessive amounts of hidden sugar that trigger AGE production.

Following are some tips on foods to avoid.

• Beware of browning foods and processed brown foods. Foods such as brown cookies and brown beans undergo a caramelizing process that increases sugars. Cooking meats at high temperature (like a broiled or well-done piece of meat) can increase AGEs as well. Try to eat fresh, unprocessed foods and cook low and slow with water whenever you can (steaming, boiling, crockpot cooking, etc.).

• Check labels and steer clear of high-fructose corn syrup.

• Avoid excess sugars, sweets and sodas.

• Watch your total overall consumption of carbohydrates. Even consuming excessive amounts of “healthful” carbs in the form of oatmeal, grains and wheat can increase sugar levels.

• Exercise regularly to increase your metabolism of sugars.

• Try to prepare fresh foods with fresh ingredients; this is the best way to cut back on your AGE intake and slow down the aging process.

Dr. Ronesh Sinha is an internal medicine physician at the Palo Alto Medical Foundation’s Los Altos Center. He also provides medical consults to high-risk South Asians.

The Palo Alto Medical Foundation and editor Arian Dasmalchi provide this monthly column.

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