Tue08042015

News

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk


Courtesy of Microbe World
Colorized low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria

When E. coli and other bacteria were discovered in some Los Altos water last week, officials from the local water supplier, California Water...

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Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

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Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

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Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

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Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

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Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

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Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

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Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Emerging technologies hold promise for seniors


Photo By: Courtesy of Greg Hartwell
Photo Courtesy Of Greg Hartwell

Emerging technologies – like the VideoCare system, above – promote interaction and allow seniors to stay in their homes as they age. A score of innovative devices on the market aim to prevent social isolation, a major problem that can significantly affect older adults’ physical and mental health.

As the first baby boomers hit 65, many industries are reviewing the demographics with a keen eye on opportunities. One of the key topics of discussion is “aging in place,” which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention define as “the ability to live in one’s own home and community safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of age, income or ability level.”

But the dream of aging in place will be a major challenge for millions of Americans. Over the next 20 years, the 65 and older population will swell 80 percent – from 40 million to more than 72 million in 2030 – and we simply don’t have the human resources to handle that much growth for health care and other needs for the aging.

If history is any indicator, Silicon Valley will once again play a leading role in creating solutions to solve such challenges. The majority of the emerging solutions can be categorized into four areas: medical and health care; health and wellness; monitoring, security and home automation; and social and communication needs.

Medical and health care

Older seniors receive a significant amount of costly care in the hospital rather than through a physician with recovery at home. With the cost of a hospital bed per day conservatively estimated at $3,500, excluding any medical services, clearly a change is needed in medical service delivery.

The primary way to reduce hospitalization is to decrease the length of stay, providing effective recovery at home rather than skilled nursing and preventing unnecessary hospitalization.

Medicare and health insurance companies will lead the way in chronic disease management. Simple diagnostic, passive devices are being developed for home use that allow for the collection, transition and diagnosis of symptoms and key hospitalization risk indicators.

Dozens of emerging technologies offering in-home monitoring of vital signs and other symptoms will play a proactive role in managing diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, among a variety of health problems. And the beauty of many of these solutions is that they are relatively passive and thus more prone to adoption than other technologies that require active patient interaction.

So-called tele-health solutions are another promising area. Many hospitals are beginning to test solutions that allow patients to skip the interim step of a skilled nursing facility by sending a patient home to recover, but with remote monitoring.

El Camino Hospital’s Senior Health Center is testing one such solution – a mobile robot called vGo. vGo is sent home with a patient while medical personnel remotely control the device to gather data – both visual and digital – to foster faster recovery and prevent relapse.

Evolving technology holds the promise of providing world-class care to patients regardless of where they live – with better outcomes at greatly reduced costs.

Health and wellness

Closely related to medical technologies are proactive solutions that will be more consumer driven, paid for out of pocket and require more active participation from the individual, including smartphone applications.

Many of these health and wellness applications require active participation, so adoption in the senior population may be slower. But over the next five to 10 years, older adults should become more comfortable with such technologies and embrace them for better quality of life and healthy living. Other examples include:

• Medication management – the average senior takes 14 different medications.

• Cognitive exercise: electronic games and puzzles such as Words with Friends, Bridge and Lumosity.

• Exercise and rehabilitation: Wii and Xbox for mobility and stroke recovery.

Monitoring, security and home automation

This category is a bit of a catchall for several different areas that overlap and complement each other, including:

• Personal emergency response systems: Lifeline and 5 Star Response.

• GPS locators.

• Activity monitors and sensors: motion detectors, bed or chair sensors and sleep monitors.

• Wireless cameras.

Many of these monitoring devices are for safety rather than medical applications. These can be very useful, but privacy issues are a concern for many seniors. While they hold promise, it may be that the next generation is more comfortable with such technology.

Social and communication needs

Social isolation is a major problem for seniors, one that significantly affects their physical and mental health. Services like Facebook, FaceTime, Skype, Instagram and others have dramatically changed social interaction in younger generations. Over time, such services could vastly improve communications between seniors and their families and friends, including:

• Simplified cellphones like Jitterbug.

• Smartphones and tablets. Although adoption is still low among seniors, the devices hold great promise for photo sharing, online games like Words with Friends and video chatting with Skype or FaceTime.

• VideoCare, Independa and other services focused specifically on devices for the older population.

As with most technologies, many mistakes will be made along the way. But in the long run, technology and Silicon Valley minds will lead the way, making the dream of aging in place a reality for millions of Americans, regardless of geography, income level or ability.

Greg Hartwell is founder and CEO of Homecare California, a Los Altos-based in-home caregiving agency. He is a frequent guest speaker on elder-care issues. Email him at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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