Sun11232014

News

LA council votes to delay community center update

LA council votes to delay community center update


Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council voted to delay adoption of a community center conceptual design plan last week. The plan includes elements from a design charette held earlier this fall, left.

The Los Altos City Council last...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
During a Science is Learning geology lesson, Theuerkauf Elementary School students learn about igneous rocks by observing how sugar changes form when heated.

Hundreds of local elementary students perform experiments w...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
PYT’s “Oklahoma!” features, from left, David Peters of Mountain View, Jenna Levere of Los Altos and Kai Wessel of Mountain View.

Time is running out to catch Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Oklahoma!”...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Eagles advance

Eagles advance


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High’s Carmen Annevelink, left, and Kristen Liu put up a block against Mountain View. Annevelink totaled 20 kills.

Mountain View High’s out-of-the-gate energy could last for only so long against rival and he...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Coping with addictions: Haugh About That?

Preparing to deal with my lifelong addiction, I stood in front of the mirror ready to confess the shame I’d been hiding. The first step to healing, I reminded myself, is to admit something is wrong.

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One


Bruce Barton/Town Crier
Hangar One, pictured here last January, will be restored under an agreement between Google and NASA.

NASA and Google Inc. forged an agreement last week that allows Google to lease a portion of NASA’s historic Moffett Fede...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

State Street science center closing Nov. 30

State Street science center closing Nov. 30


Ellie Van Houtte/
Helix at 316 State St. is closing after the completion of a one-year grant from Passerelle Investment Co. The science center became a popular destination because of its various exhibits. Town Crier

A popular downtown destination...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree


Author Tiffany Papageorge is scheduled to sign copies of new her book 11 a.m. Dec. 6 at Linden Tree Books, 265 State St., Los Altos.

Papageorge’s “My Yellow Balloon” (Minoan Moon, 2014) is a Mom’s Choice “Gold” winner. In the book, the Los Gat...

Read more:

Loading...

People

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

January 11, 1939 – November 6, 2014
Resident of Mountain View

James Windell Smith, a 40 year resident of Los Altos, passed away from complications after a post-surgery stroke November 6th, 2014 in Los Gatos, California.

Born on January 11, 1939 on...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
While many day-trippers may think that Sonoma is all about the grapes, the region boasts other delights. Try a biplane ride over the patchwork landscape.

Sonoma, a scenic two-hour drive from Los Altos, boa...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

LA Stage Company opens 'Fairway'

The Los Altos Stage Company production of Ken Ludwig’s new comedy “The Fox on the Fairway” is slated to run Thursday through Dec. 14 at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

A tribute to the English farces of the 1930s and 1940s, “Fox” is a romp that p...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am


The Beth Am Women have scheduled “A Conversation with Author Maggie Anton” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at Congregation Beth Am, 26790 Arastradero Road, Los Altos Hills.

Anton, winner of the 2012 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction, will discu...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

Read more:

Loading...

Steering teens in the right direction: Tips for teaching your children how to drive


Photo By: Courtesy of Gary Anderson
Photo Courtesy Of Gary AndersonTeens under 18 need 50 hours of training behind the wheel before getting licensed.
By Gary and Genie Anderson

 

So your 15-year-old is prepared to undertake the California Graduated Drivers License Program (GDLP) in order to be able to drive without waiting for his or her 18th birthday.

On one hand, that’s a good thing. It means that you as a parent will take an active hand in the driver training, so when your teen is finally licensed to drive alone, you’ll feel comfortable in knowing firsthand how well he or she is able to drive.

On the other hand, it also means that you and your teen will be forced to occupy the same space and do the same thing together for a period of 50 hours. For many, this is probably the last thing that a teen or parent would put on a wish list!

Helping your teens learn to drive in a safe and responsible manner is one of the most important things you can do for them at this stage in their lives. And here is why: Driving accidents – either as driver or as passenger in a teen-driven automobile – are the No. 1 cause of death for teens, and teens are four times as likely to have an auto accident per mile driven than all other drivers.

This isn’t because teens are careless, willful or unskilled. According to studies, it is because the part of the brain that thinks in terms of actions and consequences simply does not completely develop until after the teenage years.

But in today’s busy world, it’s difficult to function without driving, and the unconscious, automatic reactions required for good driving only come with practice.

Below are five tips culled from literature and experience to make the time with your teen as effective and pleasant as possible – for both of you.

 

1. Make this a combined learning experience.

The Mercedes-Benz Club of America teaches a program called Safe Drivers, Safe Families, because the organizers believe that safe driving is a family affair. Make it a point to read everything your teen is reading about safe driving practices and also take the online courses yourself. Allow your teen to correct your driving when you’re behind the wheel. If you go into the experience to find what you can learn about refreshing your own driving skills and knowledge, then both you and your teen will benefit.

 

2. Be calm and positive at all times.

Now is the time to cultivate your best Sully Sullenberger/Chuck Yeager manner. When your teen is at the wheel, point out key things in a quiet, informative and nonjudgmental manner. For example, say “The traffic is slowing up ahead” rather than “Why are you going so fast? Are you crazy? Slow down.” Whether it’s you or your teen driving, try turning the driving session into a game to see who can spot a possible problem situation first. Save the debate about the correct interpretation of rules and techniques for the living room, not inside a moving car.

 

3. Emphasize and practice focusing on driving.

We all know that cellphone use is diverting, but we also need to remember that even music, a radio talk show or a conversation with someone else in the vehicle or on a hands-free phone distracts us from driving and slows our reaction time. Remind your teen that when he or she is involved in a video game, it requires single-minded attention. Driving is just as complicated as any 360-degree, first-person action game – the only difference is that there isn’t a reset button when things go wrong, and real people may be injured, or worse.

 

4. The secret to good driving is to look ahead, think ahead and plan ahead.

If there is one fundamental principle that needs to be learned and remembered, it is that everything happens quickly. Even at 25 mph and at highway speeds, things happen almost instantaneously. The only way to compensate is to look as far ahead, around and behind you as possible when driving, to think about what is going on before you get to the problem or it gets to you, and plan and prepare in advance what you can do if it does occur.

 

5. Get your teen the best training you can.

The basic driving programs on city streets with a paid instructor are a good way to satisfy a portion of the requirements of the GDLP, but they don’t provide real experience in car control or offer the feeling of panic braking from 60 mph, or making a rapid, forced lane change to avoid an obstacle. These experiences must be taught by and practiced with an experienced instructor in a controlled off-street setting.

Fortunately, many organizations teach one-day driving skills courses on auto racetracks in Monterey, Sonoma, north of Sacramento and at local venues like Candlestick Park. Our favorite is an inexpensive professionally run program called Hooked-on Driving at www.hookedondriving.com.

Several local car clubs – including the BMW Car Club and the Porsche Club – periodically sponsor teen driving courses open to members and nonmembers. The racing schools at Sonoma Raceway Park and Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca offer defensive driving programs for teens and their parents. These courses can be one of the best investments you will ever make to protect your most precious asset: your child.

For more information on local area programs, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Longtime Los Altos residents Gary and Genie Anderson are co-owners of Enthusiast Publications LLC, which edits several car club magazines and contributes articles and columns to automotive magazines and online services. n

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos