Sat08012015

News

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk


Courtesy of Microbe World
Colorized low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria

When E. coli and other bacteria were discovered in some Los Altos water last week, officials from the local water supplier, California Water...

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Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

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Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

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Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

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Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

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Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

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Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

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Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Steering teens in the right direction: Tips for teaching your children how to drive


Photo By: Courtesy of Gary Anderson
Photo Courtesy Of Gary AndersonTeens under 18 need 50 hours of training behind the wheel before getting licensed.
By Gary and Genie Anderson

 

So your 15-year-old is prepared to undertake the California Graduated Drivers License Program (GDLP) in order to be able to drive without waiting for his or her 18th birthday.

On one hand, that’s a good thing. It means that you as a parent will take an active hand in the driver training, so when your teen is finally licensed to drive alone, you’ll feel comfortable in knowing firsthand how well he or she is able to drive.

On the other hand, it also means that you and your teen will be forced to occupy the same space and do the same thing together for a period of 50 hours. For many, this is probably the last thing that a teen or parent would put on a wish list!

Helping your teens learn to drive in a safe and responsible manner is one of the most important things you can do for them at this stage in their lives. And here is why: Driving accidents – either as driver or as passenger in a teen-driven automobile – are the No. 1 cause of death for teens, and teens are four times as likely to have an auto accident per mile driven than all other drivers.

This isn’t because teens are careless, willful or unskilled. According to studies, it is because the part of the brain that thinks in terms of actions and consequences simply does not completely develop until after the teenage years.

But in today’s busy world, it’s difficult to function without driving, and the unconscious, automatic reactions required for good driving only come with practice.

Below are five tips culled from literature and experience to make the time with your teen as effective and pleasant as possible – for both of you.

 

1. Make this a combined learning experience.

The Mercedes-Benz Club of America teaches a program called Safe Drivers, Safe Families, because the organizers believe that safe driving is a family affair. Make it a point to read everything your teen is reading about safe driving practices and also take the online courses yourself. Allow your teen to correct your driving when you’re behind the wheel. If you go into the experience to find what you can learn about refreshing your own driving skills and knowledge, then both you and your teen will benefit.

 

2. Be calm and positive at all times.

Now is the time to cultivate your best Sully Sullenberger/Chuck Yeager manner. When your teen is at the wheel, point out key things in a quiet, informative and nonjudgmental manner. For example, say “The traffic is slowing up ahead” rather than “Why are you going so fast? Are you crazy? Slow down.” Whether it’s you or your teen driving, try turning the driving session into a game to see who can spot a possible problem situation first. Save the debate about the correct interpretation of rules and techniques for the living room, not inside a moving car.

 

3. Emphasize and practice focusing on driving.

We all know that cellphone use is diverting, but we also need to remember that even music, a radio talk show or a conversation with someone else in the vehicle or on a hands-free phone distracts us from driving and slows our reaction time. Remind your teen that when he or she is involved in a video game, it requires single-minded attention. Driving is just as complicated as any 360-degree, first-person action game – the only difference is that there isn’t a reset button when things go wrong, and real people may be injured, or worse.

 

4. The secret to good driving is to look ahead, think ahead and plan ahead.

If there is one fundamental principle that needs to be learned and remembered, it is that everything happens quickly. Even at 25 mph and at highway speeds, things happen almost instantaneously. The only way to compensate is to look as far ahead, around and behind you as possible when driving, to think about what is going on before you get to the problem or it gets to you, and plan and prepare in advance what you can do if it does occur.

 

5. Get your teen the best training you can.

The basic driving programs on city streets with a paid instructor are a good way to satisfy a portion of the requirements of the GDLP, but they don’t provide real experience in car control or offer the feeling of panic braking from 60 mph, or making a rapid, forced lane change to avoid an obstacle. These experiences must be taught by and practiced with an experienced instructor in a controlled off-street setting.

Fortunately, many organizations teach one-day driving skills courses on auto racetracks in Monterey, Sonoma, north of Sacramento and at local venues like Candlestick Park. Our favorite is an inexpensive professionally run program called Hooked-on Driving at www.hookedondriving.com.

Several local car clubs – including the BMW Car Club and the Porsche Club – periodically sponsor teen driving courses open to members and nonmembers. The racing schools at Sonoma Raceway Park and Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca offer defensive driving programs for teens and their parents. These courses can be one of the best investments you will ever make to protect your most precious asset: your child.

For more information on local area programs, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Longtime Los Altos residents Gary and Genie Anderson are co-owners of Enthusiast Publications LLC, which edits several car club magazines and contributes articles and columns to automotive magazines and online services. n

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