Wed04012015

News

Council eyes bond for Hillview center

Council eyes bond for Hillview center


Rendering courtesy of city of Los Altos
The Los Altos City Council accepted an $87.5 million cost model for its preferred layout for replacing Hillview Community Center. Red lines indicate vehicle access points, and yellow lines represent pedestri...

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Schools

Oak students showcase creativity in Destination Imagination competitions

Oak students showcase creativity in Destination Imagination competitions


Courtesy of Jane Lee Choe
The Sharp Cheddars, a team of Oak Avenue School sixth-graders, perform at the Destination Imagination state competition Saturday in Riverside.

A team of seven Oak Avenue School sixth-graders traveled to Riverside last week...

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Community

Heising-Simons Foundation relocates to 400 Main St. property in Los Altos

Heising-Simons Foundation relocates to 400 Main St. property in Los Altos


Bruce Barton/Town Crier
All in the family: Mark Heising, from left, Caitlin Heising and Elizabeth Simons make up the board of the eight-year-old Heising-Simons Foundation, now in its new headquarters at 400 Main St. in downtown Los Altos.

The He...

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Comment

What would Bob do?: Editorial

The recent passing of an extraordinary Los Altos resident, Bob Grimm, has generated a range of heartfelt reaction, from sympathy to fond memories, from all corners. That’s because Bob did not discriminate in his desire to help others with his money, ...

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Special Sections

Cars that are right on track

Cars that are right on track


Courtesy of BMW
The BMW M4 is packed with power, featuring 425 horsepower and 406 pound-feet of torque.

There’s nothing more fun than driving a responsive automobile that feels alive in the curves and eager to go when given more than a touch ...

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Business

First Street's 'Fort Knox' up for sale

First Street's 'Fort Knox' up for sale


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
The Los Altos Vault and Safe Deposit Co. is on the market for $4.5 million. Its fortified steel and concrete structure has been compared to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s gold depository.

A downtown Los Altos structure “b...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

JOHN BATISTICH

JOHN BATISTICH

John Batistich of Los Altos Hills died peacefully on March 12 surrounded by his family. John is survived by his wife Claire Batistich (Vidovich) of 67 years and children Gary Batistich of Lodi and Gay Batistich Abuel-Saud of Menlo Park. He is also ...

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Travel

Eat, hike, soak: Cavallo Point Lodge offers Marin experience

Eat, hike, soak: Cavallo Point Lodge offers Marin experience


Eren Göknar/ Town Crier
Cavallo Point Lodge comprises former U.S. Army buildings, like the Mission Blue Chapel, repurposed for guests seeking a luxurious getaway.

It used to be a place where batteries of soldiers lived, with officers’ quarter...

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Stepping Out

'Fire' ignites in Mtn. View

'Fire' ignites in Mtn. View


Courtesy of Kevin Berne
The cast of “Fire on the Mountain,” includes, from left, Tony Marcus, Harvy Blanks, Molly Andrews and Robert Parsons.

TheatreWorks is slated to present the regional premiere of the musical “Fire on the Mountain” this wee...

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Spiritual Life

Spiritual Life Briefs

Oshman JCC hosts Judaism and Science Symposium

The Oshman Family Jewish Community Center has scheduled its inaugural Judaism and Science Symposium, “An Exploration of the Convergence of Jewish & Scientific Thought,” 5 p.m. April 12 at the JCC’s ...

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Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Steering teens in the right direction: Tips for teaching your children how to drive


Photo By: Courtesy of Gary Anderson
Photo Courtesy Of Gary AndersonTeens under 18 need 50 hours of training behind the wheel before getting licensed.
By Gary and Genie Anderson

 

So your 15-year-old is prepared to undertake the California Graduated Drivers License Program (GDLP) in order to be able to drive without waiting for his or her 18th birthday.

On one hand, that’s a good thing. It means that you as a parent will take an active hand in the driver training, so when your teen is finally licensed to drive alone, you’ll feel comfortable in knowing firsthand how well he or she is able to drive.

On the other hand, it also means that you and your teen will be forced to occupy the same space and do the same thing together for a period of 50 hours. For many, this is probably the last thing that a teen or parent would put on a wish list!

Helping your teens learn to drive in a safe and responsible manner is one of the most important things you can do for them at this stage in their lives. And here is why: Driving accidents – either as driver or as passenger in a teen-driven automobile – are the No. 1 cause of death for teens, and teens are four times as likely to have an auto accident per mile driven than all other drivers.

This isn’t because teens are careless, willful or unskilled. According to studies, it is because the part of the brain that thinks in terms of actions and consequences simply does not completely develop until after the teenage years.

But in today’s busy world, it’s difficult to function without driving, and the unconscious, automatic reactions required for good driving only come with practice.

Below are five tips culled from literature and experience to make the time with your teen as effective and pleasant as possible – for both of you.

 

1. Make this a combined learning experience.

The Mercedes-Benz Club of America teaches a program called Safe Drivers, Safe Families, because the organizers believe that safe driving is a family affair. Make it a point to read everything your teen is reading about safe driving practices and also take the online courses yourself. Allow your teen to correct your driving when you’re behind the wheel. If you go into the experience to find what you can learn about refreshing your own driving skills and knowledge, then both you and your teen will benefit.

 

2. Be calm and positive at all times.

Now is the time to cultivate your best Sully Sullenberger/Chuck Yeager manner. When your teen is at the wheel, point out key things in a quiet, informative and nonjudgmental manner. For example, say “The traffic is slowing up ahead” rather than “Why are you going so fast? Are you crazy? Slow down.” Whether it’s you or your teen driving, try turning the driving session into a game to see who can spot a possible problem situation first. Save the debate about the correct interpretation of rules and techniques for the living room, not inside a moving car.

 

3. Emphasize and practice focusing on driving.

We all know that cellphone use is diverting, but we also need to remember that even music, a radio talk show or a conversation with someone else in the vehicle or on a hands-free phone distracts us from driving and slows our reaction time. Remind your teen that when he or she is involved in a video game, it requires single-minded attention. Driving is just as complicated as any 360-degree, first-person action game – the only difference is that there isn’t a reset button when things go wrong, and real people may be injured, or worse.

 

4. The secret to good driving is to look ahead, think ahead and plan ahead.

If there is one fundamental principle that needs to be learned and remembered, it is that everything happens quickly. Even at 25 mph and at highway speeds, things happen almost instantaneously. The only way to compensate is to look as far ahead, around and behind you as possible when driving, to think about what is going on before you get to the problem or it gets to you, and plan and prepare in advance what you can do if it does occur.

 

5. Get your teen the best training you can.

The basic driving programs on city streets with a paid instructor are a good way to satisfy a portion of the requirements of the GDLP, but they don’t provide real experience in car control or offer the feeling of panic braking from 60 mph, or making a rapid, forced lane change to avoid an obstacle. These experiences must be taught by and practiced with an experienced instructor in a controlled off-street setting.

Fortunately, many organizations teach one-day driving skills courses on auto racetracks in Monterey, Sonoma, north of Sacramento and at local venues like Candlestick Park. Our favorite is an inexpensive professionally run program called Hooked-on Driving at www.hookedondriving.com.

Several local car clubs – including the BMW Car Club and the Porsche Club – periodically sponsor teen driving courses open to members and nonmembers. The racing schools at Sonoma Raceway Park and Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca offer defensive driving programs for teens and their parents. These courses can be one of the best investments you will ever make to protect your most precious asset: your child.

For more information on local area programs, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Longtime Los Altos residents Gary and Genie Anderson are co-owners of Enthusiast Publications LLC, which edits several car club magazines and contributes articles and columns to automotive magazines and online services. n

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