Sun02072016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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The quest to preserve Immigrant House


Photo By: Photos by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Photo Photos By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

Mary Kay Marinovich is on a mission to preserve Mountain View’s circa-1880s Immigrant House.

Mary Kay Marinovich proves the reliability of that old adage that one person can make a big difference.

The Los Altos resident has successfully spearheaded the effort to preserve a small, inconspicuous structure in downtown Mountain View that once housed immigrant families in the city’s early days.

Marinovich is inspired by personal history. Her family members from Croatia once lived in what is called “Immigrant House” at 166 Bryant St.

She remembers a friend of hers renting the house for $96 a month in the 1970s.

“We did Shakespeare and wrote plays here,” Marinovich said, standing in the living room. “The house has got a great vibe.”

Marinovich began her quest to preserve Immigrant House when she learned in July that developer Roger Burnell’s application to construct a 21,750-square-foot office building on the site met with Mountain View City Council approval.

Faced with losing the source of her memories, Marinovich pulled out all the stops. She led a petition drive, conducted face-to-face meetings with councilmembers and even wrote and performed a song about the house for a YouTube video (www.youtube.com/watch?v=AySFowHKnxA).

The city council approved preserving the building in October. Members OK’d a plan Jan. 29 that would fund $32,000 to move the 400-square-foot structure, built in the 1880s, to the city’s Municipal Operations Center on Whisman Road for no more than three years. The time would give city officials an opportunity to decide where to relocate the building permanently.

Burnell said his firm, Arnell Enterprises Inc., is taking charge of the move, scheduled for Sunday.

“We are contributing toward the engineering, (hazardous materials) remediation, management, administration and partial moving costs, and then also posting up the remainder of the funds for the balance until the city catches up and reimburses us,” he said. “Doing this saves much time, and almost two-thirds of what it would cost (the city), when one compares the bids.”

Burnell plans to begin construction on his project next month and finish the basic building by the end of October.

The search for a new site

A host of new locations for Immigrant House have been discussed, including placement at city-owned lots along Shoreline Boulevard, parkland around police headquarters, Pioneer Park and Eagle Park. Supporters said the house could be used for a variety of purposes, including as a small museum or meeting room.

“Preserving this little house will afford the opportunity for students and other interested parties to experience firsthand the culture and lifestyle of immigrant groups and its laborers who helped to settle and cultivate the Santa Clara Valley,” Marinovich wrote. “We save the homes of the wealthy – let’s save the home of the people who created them.”

Immigrant House shares its site with other small, decaying structures, including the 1,100-square-foot Pearson House, also from the 1880s era (see page 45). Pending unforeseen developments, the Pearson House and remaining structures will be demolished this month.

The next challenge for Marinovich is fundraising to restore the house. She said she has two years to raise the $100,000 needed for renovation work. She is partnering with members of the Old Mountain View Neighborhood Association, which is applying for a 501(c)(3) designation to allow fundraising events.

In the meantime, Marinovich is mixing and mingling. She joined the Mountain View Kiwanis Club, which donated $1,000 to the cause. She’s considering fundraising events and contacting key people in town for advice and guidance.

The structure has no asbestos or lead-paint problems that plague many old structures, Marinovich said, praising the sturdy redwood used for its construction.

“I keep thinking, 30 years from now, children can see this structure,” she said. “Let’s show what it looked like to the first people who came here.”

For more information on Immigrant House, email Marinovich at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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