Sat02132016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

Economy begins to turn around for Los Altos School District


Photo By: Town Crier File Photo
Photo Town Crier File Photo

Los Altos School District officials are reviewing the costs associated with introducing the full-day kindergarten program, currently offered at Gardner Bullis School, above, at all district schools.

Los Altos School District officials are preparing for the possibility of sunnier days ahead, financially speaking.

Rising property-tax projections and the passage of Proposition 30 may freeze any additional educational cuts, providing a spark of optimism after years of budget tightening.

Randy Kenyon, assistant superintendent for business services, informed the Board of Trustees of potential uses for excess funds, should they begin to trickle in.

“We need to be looking at our current and future obligations and commitments and make sure we begin setting aside funds to meet these commitments and obligations before we start making any new expenditures,” he said.

Spending decisions usually involve a balancing act among competing items in order to provide the “best result,” he added.

Kenyon advised the board to consider retiree health benefits, employee compensation, debt reduction, assets preservation and the expiration of the district’s six-year parcel tax in 2017.

He said it is also important to factor in potential “landmines” such as state budget cuts, pension system funding, possible repeal of flexibility provisions in the state budget and changes in the state funding system.

Prioritizing programs

Trustees identified which programs they wanted to examine for reinstatement down the line – PTA relief, Los Altos Educational Foundation (LAEF) relief, capital needs, employee compensation, increased technology specialist time on campuses and a full-time kindergarten program.

At the Jan. 25 board meeting, Kenyon itemized estimated funding for the programs, including priorities, target costs and timelines for potential goals. Specifics will be discussed at a later date.

• Currently the local PTAs provide nearly $600,000 of the district’s annual budget. The trustees expressed interest in relieving that burden. Kenyon proposed the goal of reducing the PTAs’ contribution to $100,000 by the 2015-2016 school year.

“That will give them the chance at the local level to fund the programs they want to fund,” he said.

• Kenyon shared that LAEF officials have indicated that they would like to decrease their contribution for K-3 classroom-size reduction. The group currently provides $900,000 annually for this purpose.

“This is just a start to the discussion,” he said. “This would allow them to focus most of their fundraising on program enrichment.”

• Trustees also expressed a desire to increase employee compensation to keep pace with inflation. Kenyon said it is difficult to plan ahead in that area, because employee contributions are subject to collective bargaining. He added that an across-the-board increase of 1 percent would cost the district approximately $300,000 annually.

• Another major area that should be addressed is facilities upkeep, Kenyon said. He suggested setting aside approximately $200,000 a year for major maintenance or replacement of facilities.

“Funds are needed to preserve assets and extend useful lives,” he said.

Another facilities goal would be to earmark funds for new portables, Kenyon added. In the past, new-developer fees covered the costs, but recently those fees have proven insufficient. He said the board should consider allocating $300,000 annually for new portables.

• Kenyon said it is a “high priority” of teachers and principals to increase the time technology specialists spend at each school. He recommended upping their time to 30 hours per week at each campus. The board could integrate the specialists’ salaries, approximately $105,000 for this year, in the current year’s budget.

• The trustees inquired about the cost of introducing a full-day kindergarten program in all district schools. Currently, the district offers the program for all schools at one location, Gardner Bullis School.

If the board implements the roll out by the 2014-2015 school year, it would be a one-time cost of $350,000 for additional facilities and an ongoing cost of $230,000 annually for additional staff, Kenyon reported.

Kenyon said the total cost of all the suggested items – PTA relief, LAEF relief, capital needs, employee compensation, increased technology specialist time on campuses and full-time kindergarten program – could run $15 million through 2018. He emphasized that he offered the information for the purpose of encouraging the board to weigh the importance of each goal against its financials impact.

“I want you to begin discussing priorities,” Kenyon told the trustees. “We are going to start planning for next year, and you should consider this information.”

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos