Sat04192014

News

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation

City chips in $7,000 for SFMOMA installation


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council earmarked $7,000 for the purchase of Chris Johanson’s artwork.

The city of Los Altos will contribute $7,000 toward the purchase of a $28,000 art installation featured in the San Francisco Museum...

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Schools

LASD students celebrate service learning

LASD students celebrate service learning


Courtesy of Sandra McGonagle
We Day, held March 26 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, exhorts students in the Los Altos School District to effect positive change.

More than 150 Los Altos School District student leaders joined 16,000 Bay Area students to ce...

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Community

Film career launches with Cannes screening

Film career launches with Cannes screening


Courtesy of Zachary Ready
Los Altos native Zachary Ready, front left, and co-director Andrew Cathey, right, celebrate their Campus MovieFest awards.

After learning the art of filmmaking as a child in the front yard of his family’s Los Altos home...

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Sports

Sports on the Side

Pathways Run/Walk slated May 10 in Hills

The 13th annual Pathways Run/Walk is scheduled 9 a.m. May 10 at Westwind Community Barn, 27210 Altamont Road, Los Altos Hills. The course wends through Byrne Preserve and onto the Los Altos Hills Pathways sys...

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Comment

Now is the time to expand parking: Editorial

Just a few short years ago, vacancies dotted downtown Los Altos. Property owners had a hard time attracting businesses because there was a shortage of customers. That is no longer true. Now, the cry is: Where are my customers going to park?

The city...

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Special Sections

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability

Epicurean's Mary Clark Bartlett: Serving sustainability


Courtesy of Michael McTighe
Mary Clark Bartlett is founder and CEO of Los Altos-based Epicurean Group.

Labels such as “healthy,” “organic” and “green” are rarely used to describe the meals served in most corporate cafes in Silicon Valley. But on...

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Business

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts

Local realtor honored for volunteer efforts


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Coldwell Banker recently recognized realtor Kim Copher, right, for her philanthropic efforts. Copher and colleague Alan Russell, left, volunteer at Reach Potential Movement, where they collect books for its Bookshelf in ...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

Noteworthy

RotaCare honors local volunteer

RotaCare Bay Area honored Jim Cochran of the RotaCare Mountain View Free Medical Clinic with the Outstanding Clinic Volunteer Award April 10 for his commitment to RotaCare’s mission of providing free medical care to t...

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Travel

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views

Sausalito: Explore the historical city with world-class views


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
Sausalito offers panoramic views of the San Francisco Bay. A number of companies schedule boat tours that sail past Angel Island and Alcatraz.

On a clear day, Sausalito offers spectacular views of the San Franc...

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Stepping Out

Western Ballet performs this weekend  at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills

Western Ballet performs this weekend at Smithwick Theatre in Los Altos Hills


Courtesy of Alexi Zubiria
Western Ballet’s “La Fille Mal Gardée” features Alison Share and Maykel Solas. The production runs Friday and Saturday at Foothill College

Western Ballet is slated to perform “La Fille Mal GardéeR...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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LAHS students celebrate History Week


Photo By: Photos By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Photo Photos By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

Los Altos High School students, left, attended a variety of presentations during History Week, including one on human trafficking that featured Los Altos High alumna Mihn Dang, right.

Los Altos High School students heard from an engaging array of speakers last week during the school’s inaugural History Week.

School faculty and parent volunteers organized a host of presentations around the theme “Rights for All.” Speakers, films and workshops addressed a variety of human-rights-related topics, from Japanese internment during World War II to the American civil rights movement, Internet privacy protections and the social impact of women’s portrayal in the media.

“Students have the opportunity to be exposed to the world and see what they are learning in the classroom in the real world,” said Principal Wynne Satterwhite. “It really gives them the opportunity to see what they are learning and how it applies to where they are going in life.”

Students and community members attended a panel discussion Jan. 16 featuring the Hon. James Robertson, retired U.S. District judge for the District of Columbia and chief counsel for the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, and Lee Rubin, attorney and former prosecutor for the Department of Justice.

The evening presentation featured a screening of “Mississippi Burning,” a film that chronicles the investigation of the murder of three civil rights activists in a small Mississippi town in 1964.

“When we are young, we are oblivious to the history that is going on around us,” Robertson said. “It’s our life.”

Robertson shared with the audience his involvement in history as a lawyer in Washington, D.C., representing protesters arrested at demonstrations after Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination in 1968. Shortly after his time in D.C., Robertson relocated to Mississippi, where he handled many civil rights cases.

Robertson recounted the history of the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s, from the death of racial segregation in schools to the implementation of voting rights for African-Americans.

“All of this was happening around me,” Robertson said. “I knew about it, but somehow I didn’t think it was history. It was my life, too.”

Robertson compared realizing that one is living in a moment of historical import to a Chinese proverb: “What is the current to a fish? The fish doesn’t know whether he is swimming upstream or downstream.”

“The civil rights breakthroughs of the ’50s and ’60s have morphed into a much broader idea of human and civil rights that your generation is going to deal with,” he told students. “Internet ethics and privacy. Immigrant rights. Consumer rights. Women’s rights. Teen rights. LGBT rights. Human trafficking. This is the current your generation is swimming in, and it is history in the making.”

Rubin, a generation younger than Robertson, discussed his experiences as a lawyer advocating for voter rights and against what he deemed the more “subtle” ways cities and counties find to discriminate against minorities.

“Even now, 48 years after the passage of the Voting Rights Act, there are still controversies and struggles regarding basic participation in the political process,” he said.

Rubin recounted a case he tried in 1995 in which a group of threatening neighbors set a cross on fire in the front yard of an African-American family – an act reminiscent of the civil rights battles in the 1960s.

“These are the kinds of hate crimes that send ripples of fear through an entire community and disrupt people’s ability to do what should be a minimum guarantee as an American family – to enjoy the sanctity of their own homes,” Rubin said.

Rubin said he hoped “Mississippi Burning” and the legacy of the murdered civil rights workers would inspire students.

“As you watch this film, remember to follow your passion, to look for wrongs to right, and that each of you can make a difference,” he said.

In addition to the panel featuring Robertson and Rubin, History Week presentations included a Forbes Magazine blogger discussing social media and Internet commerce privacy rights, leaders in the sports community addressing student athletes’ rights and programs on immigrant rights, domestic violence and bullying.

Students received a special visit from Los Altos High School alumna Mihn Dang, recently featured in the media as a prominent face for victims/survivors of human trafficking.

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