Wed02102016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans ‘5 Gallon Gala’

Los Altos High student-run charity plans ‘5 Gallon Gala’


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by plannin...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

PYT ‘Gets Famous’

PYT ‘Gets Famous’


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula Yo...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

LA Stage Company’s ‘Middletown’ continues run at Bus Barn Theater

Los Altos Stage Company’s Bay Area premiere of Will Eno’s “Middletown” is scheduled to run through Feb. 21 at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

Winner of the inaugural Horton Foote Award for Most Promising New Play in 2010, ...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

Residents prepare for flu season


Photo By: Photo by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Photo By Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier Customers queue up at the Los Altos Walgreens, top, which briefly ran out of vaccine.

Los Altos isn’t yet seeing the level of flu infection causing worry on the East Coast, but the season is heating up here, too. At Walgreens pharmacy on Second Street, vaccine supplies ran out for a day last week. When the new shipment arrived, local residents queued up in clusters at the back of the store waiting for a jab.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that everyone older than six months should be immunized with the flu vaccine. The CDC tweeted a warning last week – 128 of 135 million total doses have already been distributed. The vaccine may become increasingly difficult to obtain.

Jim Reynolds, one of the proprietors at Present gift store in downtown Los Altos, patiently waited his turn at Walgreens last week and said that reports of rising infections inspired his belated signup for the shot.

“I just kind of put it off,” he said, but “I watched the news and it’s getting bad around the United States, and I figured maybe I ought to participate.”

Los Altos resident Keane Johnson turned out for the shot after receiving an email from his rowing coach announcing that unvaccinated players wouldn’t be allowed to participate in practice. He was heading back to Boston College, where he’s a senior. Boston declared a state of public health emergency due to influenza last week, followed a few days later by New York State.

California braces

Charles Weiss, a doctor with the Palo Alto Medical Foundation who contributes to the group’s flu blog, reported that local influenza surveillance showed an uptick last week, with more than 10 percent of tests for influenza returning positive for the virus. But the total number of infected patients numbers in the dozens, not hundreds. He said the California region has been among the last to see elevated infections.

The state isn’t always last to start sniffling – Weiss notes that during the 2009 flu pandemic, California reported the first cases in the U.S.

Weiss said most of the sufferers in this area could weather a case of the flu at home, calling advice nurses as needed. But he noted that people in high-risk groups such as the very young or old and those with medical conditions that elevate the risk of complications should see a doctor if they become ill.

Pneumonia, one of the most common flu complications, occurs when the flu virus temporarily damages the lining of the respiratory tract, impairing its ability to clear itself. One warning sign of pneumonia occurs when a flu patient is getting better and suddenly becomes worse, or has a return of fever. Last year in Santa Clara County, eight patients required ICU-level hospitalization for influenza and one person died. As of Jan. 5, only one person has been similarly hospitalized this year.

Anti-viral agents such as Tamiflu can reduce the symptoms or duration of the flu, but their effect is moderate. Because the virus develops resistance as more Tamiflu is used, prescribing the treatment isn’t widespread for people at low risk of flu complications.

“There’s always reticence on the part of public health to distribute on a widespread basis a medicine that we worry about resistance developing to,” Weiss said. “It may reduce symptoms for about a day – but the overall benefit’s not as big (for typical flu sufferers) as it for the people at risk.”

He emphasized infection control measures, including staying home until a fever has been gone for 24 hours. People can spread the virus for five to seven days but tend to be more infectious while they have a fever.

Is it flu?

Wondering if you’ve already caught the flu this year? Sarah Cody, M.D., a deputy health officer for Santa Clara County, noted that the illness many called the “stomach flu” as children was most likely a norovirus, the pesky bug that causes 24-48 hours of extreme intestinal discomfort.

In contrast, “influenza virus gives you a high fever, cough, runny nose and headache, and in some groups of people it can be very serious and land them in the hospital or even cause death,” Cody said. “Kids can get vomiting with influenza, but it’s not one of the big features.”

Because one person can be hit harder by a virus than another, it can be difficult to distinguish between influenza and a cold, but Cody said body aches, chills and a feeling of just being “knocked out” tend to reflect influenza.

“If you feel run down, your nose is running, you feel kind of cruddy but you can kind of manage – that’s more coldlike symptoms,” she said. “The only one of these winter respiratory viruses that’s vaccine preventable is influenza. If you haven’t been vaccinated, get vaccinated. It certainly is going to give you a better chance.”

It takes approximately two weeks to get the full benefit of the vaccine and develop immunity. The CDC reported last week that this year’s vaccine appears to have 62 percent efficacy at preventing the illness, which is comparable to most years.

Each vaccine dose this year includes three flu strains, H2N3, H1N1 and Flu B, which match approximately 91 percent of the circulating influenza viruses detected by CDC analysis. The predominant strain currently in circulation, H2N3, is associated with higher numbers of hospitalizations and deaths.

Joe Bresee, a doctor in the CDC’s Influenza Division, said that while flu season timing is hard to predict, the virus would likely continue to be active for some time. Flu season usually peaks in January or February, but some years, infections surge as early as November and as late as April.

Residents who want to participate in local flu-tracking efforts may register at flunearyou.org.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos