Mon02082016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Residents resoundingly reject Fremont roundabout


Photo By: Courtesy of City of Los Altos
Photo Courtesy Of City Of Los Altos

A roundabout proposed for Fremont Avenue at Fallen Leaf Lane in Los Altos met with vocal opposition from neighborhood residents, who fear its installation could create additional problems.

It may be back to the drawing board for city staff after Los Altos residents again voiced overwhelming opposition to a traffic-calming roundabout proposed for the Fremont Avenue and Fallen Leaf Lane intersection.

Packing the Los Altos City Council Chamber for the second time in eight months, most residents living at or near the intersection urged councilmembers at the Jan. 8 study session to consider alternative traffic solutions to the one-lane roundabout, which many found obtrusive and contended would only add to commuter gridlock.

“You’re going to create all these unforeseen problems,” said 30-year resident Frank Martin, who maintained that accidents involving cars and bikes would increase.

Part of a collector-street traffic-calming plan the council approved in 2011, the Fremont-Fallen Leaf roundabout was the first of four proposed for Fremont intersections. A roundabout involves a large circular patch of landscaping in the middle of an intersection that forces traffic to slow down while moving around it. The initial roundabout proposal drew approximately 110 people to a May 2012 hearing, with an overwhelming majority opposed to it.

Traffic expert Frederik Venter of RBF Consulting said roundabouts are the best traffic-calming options for reducing speed and increasing safety. He justified the proposed roundabout, citing 24 accidents at that intersection over an unspecified period of years and the statistic that 85 percent of vehicular traffic on Fremont exceeds the 30 mph speed limit by up to 9 mph.

But some residents said speed was not an issue on Fremont and that morning gridlock could be partially due to an improperly synchronized traffic light at the Fremont-Belleville Way intersection, across the Los Altos border in Sunnyvale. A big concern also voiced was the prospect of vehicles turning onto Fremont during busy periods.

“The problem is left turns during high traffic periods,” said 17-year resident Greg Frees. “The roundabout will not leave any gaps (for merging traffic).”

Several longtime residents questioned the need for any traffic calming at all, especially the roundabout, which carries a $400,000 price tag.

“I’m still not clear what the problem is that we’re attempting to solve,” Frees said.

A few residents supported the roundabout. Al Hubbard of Fallen Leaf Lane called it a “perfect solution,” noting that it’s a matter of getting used to it.

“As people become more familiar with roundabouts, it’s a solution you’re going to see more and more of across the United States,” he said.

Residents suggested a wide range of alternatives to the roundabout, from speed bumps and painted “Keep Clear” signs on the street to widening the bridge along Fremont toward Loyola Corners to relieve eastbound traffic. Others suggested raising the speed limit on Fremont from 30 to 35 mph to allow police to use radar to nab speeders.

Los Altos City Councilwoman Val Carpenter suggested that city staff explore other solutions.

“We have other alternatives that are less expensive and meet the needs of the people here,” she said.

Councilwoman Megan Satterlee approved the collector-street plan in 2011 on the premise that speeding was the main concern.

“We made a bad assumption that speed is the issue,” she said.

“If speed is not the issue, then address the access and safety perspective,” Councilwoman Jeannie Bruins said. “A $2 million investment (for Fremont roundabouts) to reduce the speed 7-9 mph – that’s a sledgehammer (solution).”

Los Altos’ Transportation and Project Manager Cedric Novenario said staff’s next step is to re-evaluate traffic-calming measures on Fremont, including examination of accident reports to determine the factors causing them. He could give no timeline for when the issue would return to the council.

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