Fri07312015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

Read more:

Loading...

Ancient stories, modern rituals mix in St. Nicholas


Image courtesy of stnicholascenter.org
St. Nicholas is remembered today in spicy winter cookies. Photos courtesy of stnicholascenter.org .

Cloves and nutmeg, cinnamon and mace, ginger and cardamom – spices can signal the season of Advent just as surely as holiday albums and festive domestic greenery.

December is a month for gingerbreads, and many countries have done their part to contribute subtleties of texture, sweetness and aroma to the genre.

The speculaas, or spiced biscuit, has reached local markets in the form of Trader Joe’s “cookie butter” but has origins in Germany, Belgium, France and the Netherlands.

This brown cookie, sometimes stamped with the figure of St. Nicholas, resonates with ritual and magic that make it a fitting highlight of the season.

Growing up, I would taste such a cookie exactly once a year – after receiving it, heart aflutter, from the hands of St. Nick himself.

Nicholas’ story dates back to a third-century village on what became the southern coast of Turkey. As the story has it, Nick was a wealthy orphan who used his inheritance to assist those in need. He became the Bishop of Myra. Legends of his deeds (before and after his death) recount his provision of dowries for three young sisters menaced with slavery, and his supernatural rescue of a young boy kidnapped by pirates. Venerated as a saint, Nicholas inspired December traditions for young people that appear in American homes to this day.

Nicholas’ feast day itself, Dec. 6, often passes unremarked in the United States. But in Europe it serves as something of a “First Christmas,” a day for presents and games celebrating the early days of Advent. He’s still seen as a gift-giver – pitching sweets in an open door (or down a chimney?) and leaving presents in shoes or stockings left out at night.

When viewed as a generous member of a community rather than as a distant sprite lodged at the North Pole, St. Nick provides a more human picture of magnanimity and shared celebration. This isn’t to say he can’t be awe-inspiring.

As a young girl, I would gleefully await the appearance of the Bishop of Myra at my church. Each year a gigantic-seeming man in ornate embroidered robes, crowned by a miter and wielding an elaborate wooden crozier, would appear, bearing a basket of gingery cookies to share with his flock.

I was convinced that the man hiding behind an elaborate beard was indeed the local bishop, taking a break from his weighty church business to mingle with the children and impersonate his ancient predecessor. Years later I learned that whichever priest was available donned the bishop’s clothing and assumed the St. Nicholas role. This doesn’t take the shine off my memories of seeing an important man take time for cookies.

At my childhood church, parishioners mixed batches of cookie dough at home and then gathered in a kitchen to bake with the church’s distinctive, ancient-looking cookie molds – a kind of carved stamp against which you press the dough, creating the embossed figure of St. Nick. Sunday School parents originally organized the tradition as a way to celebrate rituals and reflect on the stories behind the season.

If you host a baking party to try the recipe below, you might also appreciate a pot of Dutch Bishop’s Wine to warm you while you work. I don’t think that was a tradition in our church’s kitchen, but it could be in yours.

For more information on St. Nicholas and additional recipes and traditions associated with his story, visit stnicholascenter.org.

St. Nicholas Cookies (Speculaas)

• 1/2 cup melted butter

• 2 cups brown sugar

• 1 tablespoon vanilla

• 1/3 cup milk

• 1 egg, beaten

• 4 1/2 cups white flour

• 1/2 teaspoon salt

• 1/2 teaspoon baking soda

• 1 tablespoon cinnamon

• 1 teaspoon ground ginger

• 1 teaspoon nutmeg

• 1 teaspoon cloves

• 1 teaspoon anise (optional)

Cream butter and sugar well, using heavy-duty mixer. Add egg, milk and vanilla. Sift dry ingredients together and add slowly to creamed mixture. Work in last portion by hand. Dough should be firm but not crumbly or sticky. If for some reason you get a batch that is too dry and crumbly, beat in milk, 1/2 tablespoon at a time.

Roll into 2 1/2-inch thick log and chill thoroughly.

To bake, preheat oven to 350 F.

Divide dough into 12 equal portions and roll each into a smooth ball. Spray cookie mold lightly with oil. Press ball into mold, working from center of mold out. Make back smooth and edges even, approximately 1/8-inch thick. Carefully peel cookie from mold and place on large, greased cookie sheet. Alternately, roll out dough and use a cookie cutter to create St. Nick silhouettes.

Bake 15 minutes. Cool on rack.

Makes 12 large cookies.

Bisschopswijn (Dutch Bishop’s Wine)

(Adapted from “Roots in Holland”)

• 1 bottle red wine

• 1 lemon

• 1 orange

• 20 cloves

• 2 tablespoons sugar

• 1 cinnamon stick

• Pinch of mace and/or saffron (optional)

Wash lemon and orange. Stud each with 10 cloves. Put all ingredients in pan. Cover and simmer gently 30-60 minutes, tasting for preference. Serve in heat-resistant glasses.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos