Sat08302014

News

A flood of candidates seek seats on high school board

Two incumbents and five newcomers are vying for seats on the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees – a significant increase in the number of candidates who have run over the past 10 years.

According to data from the Sa...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

One more candidate joins MVLA race

When longtime incumbent Judy Hannemann declined to run again, the deadline to file for the upcoming Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees election was extended by a few days. Mountain View resident Sanjay Dave registere...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

CSA salutes 'Hometown Heroes' at breakfast

CSA salutes 'Hometown Heroes' at breakfast


Mendoza

The Community Services Agency’s 2014 “Hometown Heroes” fundraising breakfast is scheduled 7:15 a.m. Sept. 19 at the Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View.

“Hometown Heroes” honors individuals and businesses for...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

No suit, no sweat

No suit, no sweat


Courtesy of the Gallagher Family
Joe Gallagher – a 12-year-old from Los Altos Hills – swims from near Alcatraz Island to the San Francisco shore. His uncle, Joe Locke, an accomplished open-water swimmer, accompanied him.

For his recent s...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Back to school, back to thumbs: Editorial

The kids are back in class at our local schools and a new political campaign season is underway, so we have our thumbs out and ready to go.

Thumbs-up: To last week’s community workshop for rebuilding the Los Altos Community Center. The Aug. 19...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Sweet Shop celebrates five-year anniversary

Sweet Shop celebrates five-year anniversary


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Sweet Shop at 994 Los Altos Ave. marks its fifth year in business Sept. 7. The shop is a popular after-school stop for families and students.

When Stacy Savides Sullivan opened the Sweet Shop at 994 Los Altos...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

"Jack London" chronicles author's adventurous life


Much has been written about American author Jack London, primarily known for his early-20th-century Western adventure novels, including the classics “White Fang” and “The Call of the Wild.”

In Earle Labor’s biography of the literary icon, “Jac...

Read more:

Loading...

People

JEFF JOHNSON

JEFF JOHNSON

Jan 10, 1967 - Aug 10, 2014

Jeff was born and raised in Los Altos. He was a graduate of Los Altos High School. He then went to Foothill College where he had an opportunity to spend 3-months in Europe through a study abroad program. That experience...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Visiting Vancouver Western Canada's premier destination has much to offer

Visiting Vancouver Western Canada's premier destination has much to offer


Photos courtesy of TOURISM VANCOUVER
Outdoor adventures abound in and around Vancouver, including a boat excursion into Horseshoe Bay and a jaunt on the Cliffwalk at Capilano Suspension Bridge Park, among the most popular attractions in British Col...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Water' rises in Mtn. View

'Water' rises in Mtn. View


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Elliot (Miles Gaston Villanueva) struggles to understand Odessa’s (Zilah Mendoza) online activity in TheatreWorks’ regional premiere of the award-winning drama “Water by the Spoonful.”

TheatreWorks’ regiona...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Spiritual Briefs

Meditation group meets at Foothills Congregational

A Weekly Meditation Practice group meets 7-8:15 a.m. Tuesdays at Foothills Congregational Church, 461 Orange Ave., Los Altos.

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host o...

Read more:

Loading...

Simple gifts ring true and may nurture better health

For the first time in history, retail sales on Black Friday topped $1 billion as millions of Americans began their holiday gift shopping early – and in earnest. But the momentum didn’t stop there, as Cyber Monday posted a 30 percent increase in sales over last year.

At first blush, this looks like pretty good news. If nothing else, it would seem to indicate that consumer confidence is improving, even though by most accounts a broader economic turnaround is still a distant dream. On the other hand, such increased spending – as well intentioned as it may be – could simply be an indication of an ongoing and potentially unhealthy consumerism that is forever seeking solace in the latest, greatest gadget.

I say “unhealthy” not because gift-giving itself is bad, but because the media-driven desire to buy this or that can cause considerable stress, particularly if the cost is beyond our present means or the desire is left unsatisfied.

While most of us consider stress no less a part of the holidays than Santa Claus and mistletoe – unavoidable but essentially harmless – medical research paints quite a different picture. In fact, studies indicate that stress accounts for 60 to 90 percent of all visits to the doctor and acts as the precursor to a variety of more serious health issues.

The underlying problem, of course, is not one of material lack. If it were, we’d see doctors prescribing fewer drugs and more widescreen TVs. It is, instead, a kind of spiritual void that would have us believe that happiness is found in things, that our worth is measured in terms of material possessions and that this void can only be filled with more spending.

This is not to say that buying fewer Game Boys and Furbys would make us happier and healthier. (I mention this in case anyone reading this column has already bought me a Furby for Christmas.) Over the years, however, I’ve found that it’s the simpler gifts that are the most meaningful.

I remember my first trip to Nepal more than a decade ago when my hosts greeted me with a garland of marigold flowers. To this day, I keep it inside a small earthenware pot as a reminder of what it means to give what you have to another, no matter how simple or insignificant it may seem.

My host accompanied his offering by saying “Namaste” and making a slight bow of his head with his hands pressed together in front of his heart – an outward expression of the belief that there is a divine spark residing in each of us. Although I’m not accustomed to greeting people this way, I do make it a habit of seeing the God-given good in others, even if I don’t share this sentiment as often or as visibly as I might like.

Even the simplest expression of gratitude, the slightest acknowledgment that we are loved, has been proven to have a significant impact on our health.

Whether or not this sort of thing could have an impact on the national economy remains to be seen. What is certain, however, is that these gifts from the heart are by far the most readily available, the most lasting, the least expensive and the most enriching.

Eric Nelson, a Christian Science practitioner, is media and legislative spokesman for Christian Science in Northern California. For more information, visit www.norcalcs.org.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos