Thu11272014

News

VTA plans for  El Camino Real prompt skepticism

VTA plans for El Camino Real prompt skepticism


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
A Valley Transit Authority proposal to convert general-use right lanes on El Camino Real to bus-only use received a chilly reception last week.

A Valley Transit Authority proposal that prioritizes public transit alo...

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Schools

MVHS students attempt Guinness World Record

MVHS students attempt Guinness World Record


Barry Tonge/Special to the Town Crier
Local residents participate in an attempt to break the Guinness World Record for making the most friendship braceletsNov. 9 at Mountain View High.

More than 300 Mountain View High School students gathered around...

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Community

Bigger, better days ahead for Foothill Veterans Resource Center

Bigger, better days ahead for Foothill Veterans Resource Center


Student veterans at Foothill College can seek support, access resources and socialize at the Veterans Resource Center.
Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier

Carmela Xuereb sees bigger things in store for the Foothill College Veterans Resource Center. One...

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Comment

Serving those who served us: Editorial

“Thank you for your service” often comes across as lip service to our veterans. As always, actions speak louder than words.

The Rotary Club of Los Altos has taken plenty of action, contributing time and money to improve opportunities for veterans th...

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Business

Report: Los Altos homes priciest in U.S.

Report: Los Altos homes priciest in U.S.


ToWn Crier File Photo
The average cost of a four-bedroom, two-bathroom home in Los Altos is 30 times more than the price of a similar home in Cleveland, according to a Coldwell Banker report.

The average cost of one Silicon Valley home can purchase ...

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Books

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree


Author Tiffany Papageorge is scheduled to sign copies of new her book 11 a.m. Dec. 6 at Linden Tree Books, 265 State St., Los Altos.

Papageorge’s “My Yellow Balloon” (Minoan Moon, 2014) is a Mom’s Choice “Gold” winner. In the book, the Los Gat...

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People

RICHARD CAMPBELL WAUGH

RICHARD CAMPBELL WAUGH

Richard Campbell Waugh of Los Altos Hills, Ca. died at home October 31, 2014 surrounded by his family and caregivers.

Dick was born 1917, in Fayetteville, Arkansas. He earned a BS in chemistry from University of Arkansas and a PhD in organic chemi...

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Travel

Weekday Wanderlust highlights the joys of armchair travel

Weekday Wanderlust highlights the joys of armchair travel


Dan Prothero/Special to the Town Crier
Travel writers at the October gathering of the Weekday Wanderlust group include, from left, James Nestor, Kimberley Lovato, Paul Rauber, Marcia DeSanctis and Lavinia Spalding.

Travel writing should either ̶...

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Stepping Out

Pacific Ballet's 'Nutcracker' opens Friday in downtown Mtn. View

The Pacific Ballet Academy is back with its 24th annual production of “The Nutcracker,” scheduled this weekend in downtown Mountain View.

The story follows young Clara as she falls into a dream where her beloved nutcracker becomes the daring prince ...

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Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

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Kimchi & me: Battling winter chill with fire


Photo By:
Homemade kimchi

I was 9 years old the first time I ate kimchi. I remember being nervous, noting that mine was one of three blonde heads peeking out in a sea of black hair at a Korean restaurant. Then I glanced over at my father and immediately felt reassured. Usually a stern, stoic man, he looked positively exuberant tucking into his plate of bulgogi and his favorite Korean condiment, kimchi.

Kimchi, the ubiquitous Korean side dish made from napa cabbage, is prepared by salting cabbage; marinating it in red pepper, garlic and other seasonings; and leaving it to ferment for weeks. The final product is strong and distinct, spicy, sour and pungent all at once. I was not a big fan after my first taste.

Yet something drew me back to it, enticing me to buy another jar every once in a while, just in case something in me had changed. Each time, I hoped that I would like it, but I was always disappointed, and my father would end up eating the entire jar. Growing up, I never understood him, or his love of kimchi.

For the longest time, I wondered why I felt compelled to keep returning to this seemingly inaccessible dish. Was it because of my unusual childhood obsession with spicy food? My lifelong sense of culinary adventure? A rebellious adolescent bid for independence, manifested in my stubborn consumption of an exotic jarred condiment?

Now, though, I look back at my young self, standing in the glow of my open refrigerator, stretching my arm toward the back, where my garlicky-smelling jar had been relegated.

And I see now that I was, in fact, reaching for something else entirely, trying to forge a connection through one of the precious few points where my father’s interests overlapped with mine. I thought, “If I could just learn to like kimchi … ,” though I never knew how that thought was supposed to end.

Now, I’ve embraced kimchi as one of my favorite foods, putting it on practically everything. I’ve also embraced my relationship with the man who introduced me to kimchi. That’s why my favorite way to eat it is the same as my father’s: straight out of the jar.

Now, I love each and every bite, relishing the sourness, savoring the painful burn, finding beauty in the pungent, angry-looking cabbage leaves, and thinking of the man who taught me to appreciate these qualities, in food and in life. And I smile to myself as I eat, knowing that if I don’t finish the jar, my dad certainly will.

Garrett Miller is a freelance writer, food blogger and graduate of Los Altos High School and UC Santa Cruz. For more of his comfort-food recipes, visit www.noodletherapy.com.

 

Ways to enjoy kimchi

• As a condiment to grilled or broiled red meats, it cuts through the fatty richness and gives great complementary acidity and spice.

• Add it into quesadillas, tacos and other Mexican foods for a do-it-yourself version of the Korean-Latin fusion popularized by Roy Choi.

• Chop it and mix it with sliced scallions and put it on a hot dog – it’s like a whole new kind of relish.

• Scatter it over fried or steamed rice. Top it with a poached egg for a tasty, well-rounded breakfast.

• Use it to make kimchi jjigae, a popular Korean kimchi and tofu stew whose heat (temperature and spicewise) will warm you up on a chilly day. You can find a recipe at www.kimchichronicles.tv/recipes/kimchi-jjigae-kimchi-stew.

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