Tue07282015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; boiling advisory still in effect

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; boiling advisory still in effect

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. 

However, officials st...

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Schools

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students


Sana Khader/Town Crier
Students use software connected to a 3D printer, left, to create a miniature San Francisco, including the Ferry Building, below, at Foothill’s STEM Summer Camps.

Expanding efforts to spark and inspire students’ int...

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Community

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters


Courtesy of the MacDonald family
Amber MacDonald competes on an episode of “Food Fighters,” scheduled to air 8 p.m. Thursday on NBC.

A newly arrived Los Altos family has an unusually public get-to-know-you moment this week – Amber MacDonald and ...

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Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ad-plane flyover marred festival

I hope that other residents who share my concern that the Geico plane flying low over the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival and our homes for hours on end marred the “fun for everyone” that the Town Crie...

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Special Sections

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience


Photos Courtesy of Tim Pierce
Los Altos Hills resident Tim Pierce, right with emergency medical responder Steve Crowley, suffered a heart attack in May.

After what Tim Pierce went through recently, no wonder he tries to cherish every moment as if he...

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Business

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center


John Ho/Special to the Town Crier
The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Center for Cosmetic Surgery at 715 Altos Oaks Drive is the organization’s first center focused solely on cosmetic procedures.

Los Altos’ newest medical office – the...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

CHARLOTTE BARBARA WINGUTH

Charlotte Barbara Winguth died July 9 at the young age of 89. She is survived by her 3 daughters Sandy, Karen & Wendi, 5 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. She came to Los Altos CA with her husband Ed and 3 children 53 years ago from New ...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Engineer builds second career as actor

Engineer builds second career as actor


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Actors rehearse for Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The cast includes, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio. ...

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Spiritual Life

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF


Courtesy of Sara BoaDwee
Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the ministry of the Rev. Dr. Malcolm Young and his wife, Heidi, at a farewell luau June 28.

Members and friends of Christ Episcopal Church bid farewell June 28 to the Rev. Dr. Malcolm C. Yo...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Kimchi & me: Battling winter chill with fire


Photo By:
Homemade kimchi

I was 9 years old the first time I ate kimchi. I remember being nervous, noting that mine was one of three blonde heads peeking out in a sea of black hair at a Korean restaurant. Then I glanced over at my father and immediately felt reassured. Usually a stern, stoic man, he looked positively exuberant tucking into his plate of bulgogi and his favorite Korean condiment, kimchi.

Kimchi, the ubiquitous Korean side dish made from napa cabbage, is prepared by salting cabbage; marinating it in red pepper, garlic and other seasonings; and leaving it to ferment for weeks. The final product is strong and distinct, spicy, sour and pungent all at once. I was not a big fan after my first taste.

Yet something drew me back to it, enticing me to buy another jar every once in a while, just in case something in me had changed. Each time, I hoped that I would like it, but I was always disappointed, and my father would end up eating the entire jar. Growing up, I never understood him, or his love of kimchi.

For the longest time, I wondered why I felt compelled to keep returning to this seemingly inaccessible dish. Was it because of my unusual childhood obsession with spicy food? My lifelong sense of culinary adventure? A rebellious adolescent bid for independence, manifested in my stubborn consumption of an exotic jarred condiment?

Now, though, I look back at my young self, standing in the glow of my open refrigerator, stretching my arm toward the back, where my garlicky-smelling jar had been relegated.

And I see now that I was, in fact, reaching for something else entirely, trying to forge a connection through one of the precious few points where my father’s interests overlapped with mine. I thought, “If I could just learn to like kimchi … ,” though I never knew how that thought was supposed to end.

Now, I’ve embraced kimchi as one of my favorite foods, putting it on practically everything. I’ve also embraced my relationship with the man who introduced me to kimchi. That’s why my favorite way to eat it is the same as my father’s: straight out of the jar.

Now, I love each and every bite, relishing the sourness, savoring the painful burn, finding beauty in the pungent, angry-looking cabbage leaves, and thinking of the man who taught me to appreciate these qualities, in food and in life. And I smile to myself as I eat, knowing that if I don’t finish the jar, my dad certainly will.

Garrett Miller is a freelance writer, food blogger and graduate of Los Altos High School and UC Santa Cruz. For more of his comfort-food recipes, visit www.noodletherapy.com.

 

Ways to enjoy kimchi

• As a condiment to grilled or broiled red meats, it cuts through the fatty richness and gives great complementary acidity and spice.

• Add it into quesadillas, tacos and other Mexican foods for a do-it-yourself version of the Korean-Latin fusion popularized by Roy Choi.

• Chop it and mix it with sliced scallions and put it on a hot dog – it’s like a whole new kind of relish.

• Scatter it over fried or steamed rice. Top it with a poached egg for a tasty, well-rounded breakfast.

• Use it to make kimchi jjigae, a popular Korean kimchi and tofu stew whose heat (temperature and spicewise) will warm you up on a chilly day. You can find a recipe at www.kimchichronicles.tv/recipes/kimchi-jjigae-kimchi-stew.

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