Mon05022016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

Kimchi & me: Battling winter chill with fire


Photo By:
Homemade kimchi

I was 9 years old the first time I ate kimchi. I remember being nervous, noting that mine was one of three blonde heads peeking out in a sea of black hair at a Korean restaurant. Then I glanced over at my father and immediately felt reassured. Usually a stern, stoic man, he looked positively exuberant tucking into his plate of bulgogi and his favorite Korean condiment, kimchi.

Kimchi, the ubiquitous Korean side dish made from napa cabbage, is prepared by salting cabbage; marinating it in red pepper, garlic and other seasonings; and leaving it to ferment for weeks. The final product is strong and distinct, spicy, sour and pungent all at once. I was not a big fan after my first taste.

Yet something drew me back to it, enticing me to buy another jar every once in a while, just in case something in me had changed. Each time, I hoped that I would like it, but I was always disappointed, and my father would end up eating the entire jar. Growing up, I never understood him, or his love of kimchi.

For the longest time, I wondered why I felt compelled to keep returning to this seemingly inaccessible dish. Was it because of my unusual childhood obsession with spicy food? My lifelong sense of culinary adventure? A rebellious adolescent bid for independence, manifested in my stubborn consumption of an exotic jarred condiment?

Now, though, I look back at my young self, standing in the glow of my open refrigerator, stretching my arm toward the back, where my garlicky-smelling jar had been relegated.

And I see now that I was, in fact, reaching for something else entirely, trying to forge a connection through one of the precious few points where my father’s interests overlapped with mine. I thought, “If I could just learn to like kimchi … ,” though I never knew how that thought was supposed to end.

Now, I’ve embraced kimchi as one of my favorite foods, putting it on practically everything. I’ve also embraced my relationship with the man who introduced me to kimchi. That’s why my favorite way to eat it is the same as my father’s: straight out of the jar.

Now, I love each and every bite, relishing the sourness, savoring the painful burn, finding beauty in the pungent, angry-looking cabbage leaves, and thinking of the man who taught me to appreciate these qualities, in food and in life. And I smile to myself as I eat, knowing that if I don’t finish the jar, my dad certainly will.

Garrett Miller is a freelance writer, food blogger and graduate of Los Altos High School and UC Santa Cruz. For more of his comfort-food recipes, visit www.noodletherapy.com.

 

Ways to enjoy kimchi

• As a condiment to grilled or broiled red meats, it cuts through the fatty richness and gives great complementary acidity and spice.

• Add it into quesadillas, tacos and other Mexican foods for a do-it-yourself version of the Korean-Latin fusion popularized by Roy Choi.

• Chop it and mix it with sliced scallions and put it on a hot dog – it’s like a whole new kind of relish.

• Scatter it over fried or steamed rice. Top it with a poached egg for a tasty, well-rounded breakfast.

• Use it to make kimchi jjigae, a popular Korean kimchi and tofu stew whose heat (temperature and spicewise) will warm you up on a chilly day. You can find a recipe at www.kimchichronicles.tv/recipes/kimchi-jjigae-kimchi-stew.

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