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News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

"Fearless Genius" photos chart Silicon Valleys brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photographs Menuez to...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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Fall and winter gardens can fill the table, too


Photo By: Courtesy of Collective Roots
Photo Courtesy Of Collective Roots Plant edible flowers between vegetables or at the end of garden rows to bring fall and winter color to salads.

It’s the beginning of autumn, the sun arcs closer to the horizon and the nights come upon us quickly. It’s the time of year when our friends tell us their gardens are finished for the year. We’re always surprised to find that most native Californians fail to realize that winter vegetable gardens can be the most productive of the year. We are lucky to live in this part of the Bay Area, where the growing season never has to end.

As each plant variety stops producing, we recompost and turn the soil in that section of the garden, and then reseed or plant vegetables for the upcoming season. We also try to include edible flowers between the vegetables not only for beauty, but as protection from pests. The garden changes its looks from month to month but is usually lush and inviting.

What are we planting right now in the Collective Roots gardens? Spinach, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, lettuce, kale, Swiss chard, kohlrabi, radishes, carrots, spring onions, leeks, artichokes and peas.

There are even some edible flowers that can be planted now between the vegetables or at the ends of garden rows. Pansies, borage, society garlic and calendula all provide fall and winter color and can add color and flavor to salads and benefit pollinators. These plants should go in the ground now while the soil is still warm so that they can become established before the cold weather sets in. You will be amazed at the bounty you may produce throughout the winter and spring.

Here at the Collective Roots’ Garden at the East Palo Alto Charter School, students are planting nine kinds of carrots – Atomic Red, Lunar White, Solar Yellow, Scarlet Nantes, Round Romeo and Little Finger, to name a few.

Students use the garden to learn about science concepts such as decomposition as well as anatomy and human health. They turn the compost and apply it to their garden beds, then harvest and prepare vegetables as they discuss how the nutrients impact our bodies.

A popular recipe this time of year is Cool Carrot Coleslaw, ideal as a hearty side dish or piled atop quinoa for a main course. There are many nutrients to talk about – vitamin A and beta-carotene in carrots, vitamin C and fiber in cabbage and protein in soy.

As we plant new cabbage and carrots for our fall and winter garden, students get to see and eat the now-mature carrots and cabbage they planted in the spring. Munching on the tasty, tangy slaw makes it easier to imagine those tiny seeds and seedlings growing into big vegetables.

Los Altos resident Sally Perham Chavez is a board member and Eron Sandler is director of programs at Collective Roots, a nonprofit, educational group focused on growing and preparing food from the garden. For more information, visit www.collectiveroots.org.

Cool Carrot Coleslaw

• 4 ounces firm tofu

• 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil

• 1/2 medium onion

• 3 tablespoons cider vinegar

• 1/2 teaspoon salt

• 2-3 medium carrots

• 1/2 medium head of cabbage

• 2 tablespoons fresh dill, finely minced

• 1 teaspoon tamari or soy sauce

 

Finely mince onion and marinate in small bowl with vinegar and salt.

Grate carrots and add to large bowl.

Chop cabbage into fine ribbons and add to bowl.

Cut tofu into small cubes. Add tofu, tamari or soy sauce and olive oil to bowl.

Chop dill and add to bowl.

 

Serves 4-6 as a side dish.

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