Wed01282015

News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

‘Fearless Genius’ photos chart Silicon Valley’s brain trust

‘Fearless Genius’ photos chart Silicon Valley’s brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photogr...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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The window to better learning: Keeping your children's eyes healthy


Photo By: Town Crier File Photo
Photo Town Crier File Photo Fatigue after reading for a short time is one of several common signs that a child may have a vision problem.

August is National Children’s Vision & Learning Month. As teachers busily prepare their classrooms and parents gather school supplies and backpacks to equip their children for the new academic year, I often wonder as an optometrist and a mom how many schoolchildren have been checked to determine if one of their most important assets for higher learning is intact. I am referring to a child’s vision.

Our vision is the primary way we gather information about the world around us. In fact, 80 percent of learning occurs through the visual system. Without good vision, many aspects of our lives are affected. But what is not commonly known is how poor vision can play a large part in poor academic and sports performances, in addition to causing primary learning disabilities.

Many parents expect children to complain when they have poor vision, just as they would with a toothache. But the truth is that children cannot possibly know what good vision is if all they have known their entire lives is blurry vision. That is normal to them.

Vision, however, can be as personal as someone’s color preference. A person’s brain will make abnormal adaptations to poor vision to accommodate and achieve better ability to see. For the most part, these adaptations to poor-quality vision are not even known by the child or his or her parents.

Parents often expect school screenings and pediatric examinations to affirm that their child’s vision is OK. But these screenings in general can only catch very gross vision issues, such as high myopia (nearsightedness) or amblyopia (lazy eye).

These screenings cannot detect learning difficulties that are attributed to poor vision. Problems in eye coordination, eye focusing, eye tracking, visual perception and integration (how visual information is processed) play an important role in academic performance. However, they are not assessed in a typical school or pediatric vision screening. Viewing the eye chart and reading a few letters or shapes correctly does not equate to a good visual system.

Good vision is learned, and learning good vision can directly affect one’s ability to assess his or her environment. Famous athletes often receive vision training to improve their performance in their respective sport.

How would you know if your child has a vision problem? Check for the following problems that may extend from an underperforming visual system within a child.

• Complaints of blurry vision

• Frequent squinting

• Frequent eye rubbing

• Closing an eye when reading

• Reading for a short time before getting tired

• Poor reading comprehension

• Headaches when reading

• Losing place or skipping words when reading

• Short attention span

• Difficulty recognizing letters or numbers

• Letter or number reversal

• Red eyes after reading for a short time

• Poor copying skills

• Unable to see 3D images

Aside from the symptoms above, when a child is diagnosed with a learning disability, whether it is Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, dyslexia or even autism, it is paramount that a vision assessment is among the first evaluations performed.

A recent study conducted by researchers at the Children’s Eye Center at the University of San Diego discovered a close relationship between convergence insufficiency (inability of eyes to turn toward each other) and ADHD.

Children should undergo a full eye exam no later than kindergarten. An optometrist should closely review every aspect of the visual system, including focusing, tracking and binocularity skills (how well two eyes work together as a team) to prepare a child for school. Children should have eye exams at least once a year from that time on.

In the meantime, keep your child’s eyes healthy by reducing video screen time and increasing family time outdoors. The eyes are part of the body and a window to your child’s learning. Maintaining a balanced lifestyle will encourage good vision and healthy learning.

Dr. Susan Lodenquai is an optometrist at Altos Family Optometry, 668-B Fremont Ave., Los Altos. For more information, call 948-5061 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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