Sun02012015

News

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016

Foothill to offer four-year degree: Foothill aims to launch dental hygiene degree in fall 2016


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Students enrolled in Foothill College’s two-year dental hygiene program, above, can soon earn a four-year bachelor’s degree for approximately $10,000.

Foothill-De Anza Community College District Chancellor Linda M. Th...

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Schools

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum

Freestyle hosts exhibition at Computer Science Museum


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Mountain View High junior and Freestyle Academy student Radika Gupta, right, works with a fellow student during a WebAudio course this month.

For three periods a day, a small subset of students from Los Altos and Mountain Vi...

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Community

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection

Museum explores Stanford, Valley connection


Courtesy of Julie Rose
The Los Altos History Museum’s “Symbiotic Superstars” event drew a crowd including, from left, “The Lure & the Legends” creator Nan Geschke, Stanford President John L. Hennessy, historian Leslie Berlin and Adobe Systems c...

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Comment

Good compromise on PE exemptions: Editorial

While “Deflategate” captures the national sports headlines, the local issue of physical education class exemptions for freshmen seems a much worthier sports topic for discussion.

The Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Truste...

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Special Sections

Your Home Brief

Filoli hosts bird exhibition

Filoli kicks off the 2015 season of art exhibitions in its Visitor and Education Center with “The Birds of America: Audubon Collection,” a selection of prints from Filoli’s Permanent Collection, Feb. 10...

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Business

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street

Wine & beer lounge coming to First Street


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The new wine and beer lounge Honcho heads to First Street, with a spring opening anticipated.

A cocktail lounge proposed for First Street has cleared its first hurdle – the Los Altos Planning and Transportation Comm...

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Books

"Fearless Genius" photos chart Silicon Valleys brain trust


Not every book needs pages and pages of words to tell a story – some do it through pictures.

“Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley, 1985-2000” (Atria Books, 2014) by Doug Menuez features more than 100 photographs Menuez to...

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People

RUBY DOSHIM LAI

Ruby Doshim Lai was born on July 26, 1929 and passed away at home on January 10, 2015. A resident of Los Altos for over 50 years, Ruby is survived by her husband Bill; children Gwen, Tracy and Allyn; and grandchildren Kiyoshi and Misa.

Born on Mott ...

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Travel

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill

Cuban photographer slated to appear at Foothill


Courtesy of Raúl Cañibano
Cuban photographer Raúl Cañibano is set to appear at Foothill College tonight. His work – including the image “Series: Guajira’s Land, Viñales, 2007,” right – is on display at the KCI Gallery t...

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Stepping Out

'Betrayal' at Pear

'Betrayal' at Pear


Ray Renati/Special to the Town Crier
The cast of Pear Avenue Theatre’s “Betrayal” includes Maryssa Wanlass, from left, Fred Pitts and William J. Brown III.

The Pear Avenue Theatre presents Harold Pinter’s investigation of modern relationships, “...

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Magazine

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike

Tracing history on foot: Hidden Villa’s long hike


Campers on Hidden Villa’s Sierra Backpacking Trip study historical photos to measure how the land has changed and alternate serving as student leaders who guide the route of their three-week trek.

Amid the high-tech camps and programs of a Bay Area ...

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Beating the back-to-school blues

As summer vacation draws to a close, I am reminded of the plight of squirmy students – the ones who wriggle in their seats and cannot sit still as the teacher talks. Even if these students try to pay attention, they are easily distracted by a fly on the wall or the child in the back corner and then – What was the lesson again? What was the homework assignment? Is there really a book report due next week?

Transitioning back to school can be especially difficult for students who need a certain high level of activity to maintain their concentration and focus.

Many children go from a summer filled with sports camps where they run around all day to a classroom environment where they must sit for several hours in a row. Their daily steps, if tracked on a pedometer, could plummet from 30,000 to 7,000 in a matter of days, and that makes for a good deal of unused energy, which could translate into squirminess, boredom and/or unhappiness.

In honor of such students, I offer the following tips for a smooth transition to the school year.

• Sample breakfasts. A recent study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that nearly 14 percent of high school girls and 13 percent of high school boys don’t eat breakfast at all – and many more skip breakfast one or several days a week – which contributes to irritability, lack of focus and general annoyance.

Before school starts, collaborate with your children to develop three to five tasty breakfast options that include protein and complex carbohydrates. At least two should be grab-and-go options for those late mornings that they can take and eat during their morning break. Breakfast bars made with rolled oats, flaxseed and almond butter can be prepared ahead of time.

• Vigorous exercise. Several years ago, I worked with a high school sophomore who started jogging 15-20 minutes before getting ready for school. He quickly saw a marked difference in his ability to focus and concentrate during his morning classes.

Many students exercise or play sports after school, but for those who struggle to pay attention in class, a short burst of exercise before school may be helpful. If that is not an option, it can also prove effective for students to prioritize a short spurt of activity before sitting down to do homework in the afternoon.

• Collaborate on family guidelines. Perhaps your family has already done this, but each school year can be different – and it’s useful to initiate a proactive conversation before the school year begins, especially if your child is transitioning to junior high or high school. Sample topics: homework (when, where and how it will be completed), technology (rules for proper use/abuse), sleep, etc.

Last year, a high school freshman admitted to me that he wished his parents would take away his phone when he did his homework, because it was such a distraction and he couldn’t regulate himself. (I guarantee that student had never told his parents that!)

• Schedule playtime. Play is crucial for creativity, problem solving and stress relief. Too many children stop playing too soon – high school students still need playtime. Play is often confused with obligations like sports and extracurricular activities. As part of that family conversation, devote a few hours a week to play.

Ana Homayoun is founder and director of the Los Altos-based Green Ivy Educational Consulting. She is the author of “That Crumpled Paper Was Due Last Week: Helping Disorganized and Distracted Boys Succeed in School and Life” (Perigee Trade, 2010) and the upcoming “The Myth of the Perfect Girl: Helping Our Daughters Find Success and Happiness.” For more information, visit www.greenivyed.com.

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