Wed08202014

News

Candidates finalized for schools, councils

Candidates finalized for schools, councils


Election season is officially in full swing, as eligible candidates for various city council and school district seats met Friday’s filing deadline set by the Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters.

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Schools

Local tutoring center earns kudos in parent magazine's reader poll

Local tutoring center earns kudos in parent magazine's reader poll


Courtesy of Kobad Bugwadia
Mathnasium’s fourth-grade participants, from left, Jenna Haynie, Maelle Allanic, Tanish Gupta, Hamza Raza and David Chan, join instructors to celebrate their achievements in the tutoring center’s national TriMathlon this ...

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Community

Back to School: Tips, kits and a poem

Back to School: Tips, kits and a poem

Los Altos teachers are readying their rooms this week for the coming onslaught of students, and parents are digging back out lunch boxes and pencil cases (do we still use those?) And here in the newsroom, Town Crier writers offered a slate of back-to...

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Sports

Tyler Johnson: From hills to Heat

Tyler Johnson: From hills to Heat


Courtesy of NBAE/Getty Images
Shooting guard Tyler Johnson, a St. Francis High graduate from Mountain View, signed with the Miami Heat last week.

Signed by the Miami Heat as an undrafted free agent last week, rookie Tyler Johnson faces an uphill ba...

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Comment

Really, why the, eh, consolidation?

The recent merger (consolidation?) of the newly formed Friends of Los Altos (FOLA) and the 14-year-old civic organization Los Altos Neighborhood Network (LANN) left us puzzled.

A July 28 press release, which did not state plainly that the merger fol...

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Special Sections

Globetrotting – one glass at a time

Globetrotting – one glass at a time


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
Take a tour of the world from your own picnic table with a selection of regional wines, above. Argentina’s white wines, left, pair well with a choriza pizza (see recipe on page 35).

I’m taking a...

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Business

Torrey Pines Bank names regional president

Torrey Pines Bank names regional president


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Torrey Pines Bank recently named Fred Voss its regional president for the Bay Area. The bank has branches at 20 First St. in Los Altos, above, and in Oakland and Southern California.

Torrey Pines Bank last week appointed ...

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Books

People

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

TIMOTHY WARREN WATSON (TIM)

Born June 2, 1935, died peacefully on August 11, at home in Mountain View, surrounded by his family. He died of complications of Parkinson’s Disease after a courageous 15-year battle.

Tim was the beloved husband of 55 years to his college sweethea...

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Travel

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site

Bergama bound: A visit to newest World Heritage site


Photo Eren GÖknar/ Special to the Town Crier
The amphitheater in Turkey’s ancient city of Pergamon, now known as Bergama, overlooks the Bakirçay River valley, left. The city’s ruins also include the Temple of Trajan.

It was 90 F during t...

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Stepping Out

No ‘Water’ shortage in Mtn. View


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Elliot (Miles Gaston Villanueva) struggles to understand Odessa’s (Zilah Mendoza) online activity in TheatreWorks’ regional premiere of the Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “Water by the Spoonful....

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Spiritual Life

Spiritual Briefs

Meditation group meets at Foothills Congregational

A Weekly Meditation Practice group meets 7-8:15 a.m. Tuesdays at Foothills Congregational Church, 461 Orange Ave., Los Altos.

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Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

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Transitional kindergarten faces possible closing

The Los Altos School District's transitional kindergarten program may be among those on the choppingblock as officials face cuts to balance their 2001-2002 budget.

The program at Loyola School, created to ease students who may not be ready for the normal kindergarten curriculum into the system, will likely be recommended for elimination, said Superintendent Marge Gratiot.

"We are proceeding with the assumption that we will not have transitional kindergarten (next year)," said Gratiot, who will recommend cuts to the district's budget review committee. Committee recommendations then go to the board of trustees for approval.

The possible cut does not sit well with parents of the 15 students currently in the program.

"I think it's given (my son) Cole a lot of confidence," said parent Sandra Limbach. "It's also taught him a lot of stuff I don't even remember learning in kindergarten."

She said instructor Jenni Taylor has created an atmosphere that allows students to learn about such subjects as ecology, social awareness and manners. Gratiot said Taylor would likely be moved to a kindergarten class if the district cancels the program.

Gratiot said she doesn't see the class as a top priority, because parents have the option of keeping their children in preschool for an extra year, or holding them back in the traditional kindergarten class. If transitional kindergarten were kept, she said another much-needed class would face the budget ax.

"It's not a reflection of the value of the program," Gratiot said.

However, Limbach and other traditional kindergarten parents said the program should be kept because it fills the middle ground between preschool and traditional kindergarten.

Some parents don't want to pay the costs of another year at preschool. Others worry about putting their children in a traditional kindergarten class before they are ready. Doing so might adversely affect their children's self-esteem, parents said.

Furthermore, "preschool is a play environment," Limbach said. "Transitional kindergarten is more structured and educational."

Two parents of current TK children used the public forum of the March 5 LASD Board of Trustees Meeting to advocate retention of the program.

Janice Palomo said, "The district might save money now cutting the transitional kindergarten; but it will spend that and more for special education, aides, etc., as time goes on."

"What can I do to save the program?" said Beth Hopwood. "It is worth it to me ... parents would pay."

In a letter to the editor, parents Amanda and Denis Brotzel said an extra year of regular kindergarten could hurt these students throughout their primary school years.

"It may mean (teachers) have to increase their class size and possibly have children amongst the class that are not really ready to be there," the Brotzels wrote.

"Of even more concern is that larger classes with perhaps more than 20 children in a classroom will reduce the attention that can be given to each child and therefore the overall quality of education. And, of course, this will have a knock-on effect through the higher grades."

But Gratiot summed up transitional kindergarten this way: "This is truly an extra program - we can educate the children without it."

The district is forced to make cuts because of the significant pay increases it gave teachers last year. Officials are increasing pay a total of 12 percent over this year and next, but Gratiot indicated district teachers had been underpaid.

"Their salaries are comparable to other school districts," as a result of the new contract, Gratiot said.

While the district expects the amount of state money to increase, state funding typically covers only 60 percent of the budget, Gratiot said. The district must handle the remainder. Meanwhile, salaries account for 85 percent of the budget. On top of the salary increase, the district stands to lose $400,000 in lease revenues from tenants at Covington as it moves to reopen the school. The district needs about $3 million to balance the budget for next year, but about $1 million of that can be made up through staffing adjustments, said Randy Kenyon, associate superintendent in charge of business services.

Changes could mean bumping up class sizes at the kindergarten level to 24 students, which would cost the district half of its class-size state funding - from $900 to $450 per child. However, officials said the balance would still be larger than complying with the 20-student maximum under class-size criteria.

Gratiot said the budget review committee would make recommendations for cuts to the board of trustees in April.

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