Mon02082016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Hiruko brings holistic healing and martial arts to children


Joe Hu/Town Crier
Cameron Cronwall delivers a whopping Tae Kwon Do kick for Hiruko martial arts instructor Jorge Tejada. Hiruko is a holistic wellness center that blends healing and martial arts. The business is located at Loyola Corners.

If you're feeling stressed and in need of meditation, chances are your children are, too. Throw a noncombative emphasis on martial arts into the mix, and you're likely to celebrate what Hiruko, a Los Altos holistic wellness center, has to offer.

The center, located at Loyola Corners, integrates expressive arts like meditation with healing arts such as Tai Chi and Qigong and offers classes for all ages. Fewer than one-third of their clients so far, however, are older than 13, said teacher and executive director Natalia Gabrea Tejada.

Pass the birch-floor studio with its vibrant orange walls most afternoons and you're likely to catch a healing and martial arts class in action.

Hiruko is the Japanese god of the morning sun who, according to lore, guards the health of children, explained Tejada.

Although the children dress in the customary Tae Kwon Do uniforms, their eclectic class routine is noticeably different from that at other traditional martial arts studios. Some elements of a martial arts studio remain intact, though. Teachers Natalia and her husband, Jorge, command respect. They require each child to bow before walking barefoot onto the mat and to address their teachers formally.

The students recite a student commitment - approximately 10 lines - avowing that they are responsible for their actions and will strive to become a positive, changing force in the world.

With a playful tone, the teachers lead the children in relaxation exercises, evoking colorful images with commands like "breathe like a dragon" or "be still like the mountains." After a brief tae kwon do kicking session, Jorge asks his disciples to recall their acupuncture lessons from past classes.

"Where do you press if you have a headache?" he asked as the students quickly placed pressure to their thumbs.

Hiruko's brand of martial arts, said Jorge, a Tae Kwon Do and Jujitsu master, is not combative but contemplative, as it draws from its chinese origins. Introducing children to the basics of Tai Chi is beneficial to their health and mental well-being, added Natalia.

Another popular class designed specifically for 4- to 7-year-olds is "Playday." The children are allowed to define the constraints of their games and the rules. The emphasis is on cooperation not competition, said connection and integration specialist Angela Booker.

"It's a combination of a wellness center and martial arts. Hiruko focuses on the whole person, not just a sport. They've done it very well," said Shelli Herbert, a Los Altos business owner whose son and daughter are enrolled in the Healing and Martial Arts program.

After a year in the program, Herbert said her son Joshua has made noticeable improvements.

"His focus is much better in school, and his sense of respect for adults has improved," Herbert said.

Adult classes include cardio kickboxing, Qigong and Tai Chi, and a strength and stretching class. Wellness seminars and special events, including women's self-defense and nutrition consulting, are available to adults as well.

Class prices range from $135-$165 per month, depending on duration of commitment and age. Scholarships for children are available.

For more information, call 949-1233 or visit www.hirukocenter.com.

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