Wed09172014

News

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates


Nine candidates have filed to run for three open seats on the Mountain View City Council in the Nov. 4 election – none of them incumbents. The Town Crier asked them to introduce themselves to readers in the following Q&A format. We knew the...

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Schools

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The Los Altos School District’s newly expanded Facilities Advisory Committee met for the first time last week. The 28-member committee’s first task is to prioritize campus improvement projects.

The Los Altos Scho...

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Community

Sports

New-look Lancers find their footing

New-look Lancers find their footing


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Jenna Adams, left, and Carly Deale attempt to bump the ball Friday night. The juniors combined for 28 kills.

This year’s St. Francis High girls volleyball team faintly resembles last season’s squad ...

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Special Sections

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
An estimated 75 supporters of higher teacher pay turned out for the Sept. 4 Mountain View Whisman School District board meeting.

Teachers, trustees and administrators are recovering from a dramatic Mountain View Whism...

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Business

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Esthetician Marjan Kashi showcases one of the treatment rooms at her new studio, Pure Serenity Skincare at Rancho Shopping Center. Kashi provides services including microdermabrasion and various light and heat energy the...

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Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation


During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

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People

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

Resident of San Jose and Los Altos, California

July 21, 1931 to August 4, 2014

Born in Arimo, Idaho, to Jerald Emmett and Rebecca Henderson Nelson Christiansen. Raised in Davis and Riverside, California, with summers in Downey, Idaho, and in Loga...

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Travel

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska


Sandy Powell/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident and bird photographer Sandy Powell recently visited Homer, Alaska, to photograph Sandhill cranes, below. While there, Powell also encountered moose, left.

Los Altos resident Sandy Powell, a...

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Stepping Out

Pear puts on a pair of plays

Pear puts on a pair of plays


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Dan Kapler (as Teddy) and Betsy Kruse Craig (Trish) star in Pear Avenue Theatre’s “House.”

The Pear Avenue Theatre production of two interlocking comedies by Alan Ayckbourn – “House&...

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Spiritual Life

Back to Church Sunday offers opportunity to recommit

The children in Los Altos are back to school, and I can still hear parents cheering. Summer is officially over, even if the calendar doesn’t quite think so.

Parents have attended Back to School nights to meet their children’s teachers. B...

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Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host...

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Hiruko brings holistic healing and martial arts to children


Joe Hu/Town Crier
Cameron Cronwall delivers a whopping Tae Kwon Do kick for Hiruko martial arts instructor Jorge Tejada. Hiruko is a holistic wellness center that blends healing and martial arts. The business is located at Loyola Corners.

If you're feeling stressed and in need of meditation, chances are your children are, too. Throw a noncombative emphasis on martial arts into the mix, and you're likely to celebrate what Hiruko, a Los Altos holistic wellness center, has to offer.

The center, located at Loyola Corners, integrates expressive arts like meditation with healing arts such as Tai Chi and Qigong and offers classes for all ages. Fewer than one-third of their clients so far, however, are older than 13, said teacher and executive director Natalia Gabrea Tejada.

Pass the birch-floor studio with its vibrant orange walls most afternoons and you're likely to catch a healing and martial arts class in action.

Hiruko is the Japanese god of the morning sun who, according to lore, guards the health of children, explained Tejada.

Although the children dress in the customary Tae Kwon Do uniforms, their eclectic class routine is noticeably different from that at other traditional martial arts studios. Some elements of a martial arts studio remain intact, though. Teachers Natalia and her husband, Jorge, command respect. They require each child to bow before walking barefoot onto the mat and to address their teachers formally.

The students recite a student commitment - approximately 10 lines - avowing that they are responsible for their actions and will strive to become a positive, changing force in the world.

With a playful tone, the teachers lead the children in relaxation exercises, evoking colorful images with commands like "breathe like a dragon" or "be still like the mountains." After a brief tae kwon do kicking session, Jorge asks his disciples to recall their acupuncture lessons from past classes.

"Where do you press if you have a headache?" he asked as the students quickly placed pressure to their thumbs.

Hiruko's brand of martial arts, said Jorge, a Tae Kwon Do and Jujitsu master, is not combative but contemplative, as it draws from its chinese origins. Introducing children to the basics of Tai Chi is beneficial to their health and mental well-being, added Natalia.

Another popular class designed specifically for 4- to 7-year-olds is "Playday." The children are allowed to define the constraints of their games and the rules. The emphasis is on cooperation not competition, said connection and integration specialist Angela Booker.

"It's a combination of a wellness center and martial arts. Hiruko focuses on the whole person, not just a sport. They've done it very well," said Shelli Herbert, a Los Altos business owner whose son and daughter are enrolled in the Healing and Martial Arts program.

After a year in the program, Herbert said her son Joshua has made noticeable improvements.

"His focus is much better in school, and his sense of respect for adults has improved," Herbert said.

Adult classes include cardio kickboxing, Qigong and Tai Chi, and a strength and stretching class. Wellness seminars and special events, including women's self-defense and nutrition consulting, are available to adults as well.

Class prices range from $135-$165 per month, depending on duration of commitment and age. Scholarships for children are available.

For more information, call 949-1233 or visit www.hirukocenter.com.

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