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News

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics


The Town Crier chronicled the first election of Los Altos City Council incumbent Jarrett Fishpaw in 2010 and documented the Los Altos candidacy of Jean Mordo, who volunteered as a longtime public servant in Los Altos Hills before moving to the flat...

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Schools

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system


Courtesy of St. Simon Parish School
St. Simon fifth-grader Matthew Cummins uses a laptop in class last week. The school’s cloud-based Schoology system boosts organization and collaboration.

Families at St. Simon Parish School in Los Altos laun...

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Community

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos main library is among the more popular branches in the county library district system, set to celebrate 100 years.

In 1914, Babe Ruth made his debut with the Boston Red Sox, wages hit $5 per day, the first ste...

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Sports

Eagles eye another stellar season

Eagles eye another stellar season


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High outside hitter Carmen Annevelink, right, goes for the kill Thursday against Palo Alto, as teammates Sarah Tritschler, left, and Lulu Kishton prepare to play defense. The Eagles won the match in straight ga...

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Comment

Torok, Walter, Dave for MVLA board: Editorial

There’s really nothing major you can criticize about the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District. It offers a diverse array of effective programs for all types of students. Its instructors, with few exceptions, are outstanding.

Howe...

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Special Sections

'Funabout' Fiat

'Funabout' Fiat


Photos courtesy of Fiat
The 2014 Fiat 500e uses 29 kilowatt-hours per 100 miles, which the engineers claim is the equivalent of 116 mpg of gas use. It has a sticker price of $33,095.

If you believe in climate change, would love to see alternat...

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Business

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground


Ted Fagenson

An East Bay app developer is testing his newest creation in downtown Los Altos.

Ted Fagenson, co-founder of Skrownge (pronounced “scrounge”), told the Town Crier that he’s beta testing his mobile gaming app this week ...

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Books

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween


Courtesy of Dee Ellmann
Jenny Hurwick self-published her picture book last month after decades of storytelling.

During her years working as a teacher and a Los Altos mom, Jenny Hurwick loved to tell stories. One tale she crafted for her son just se...

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People

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

July 27, 1953 – August 12, 2014

Native Los Altan died Medford, OR. Graduated Bellarmine Prep. Married Josephine Domino, 1950. Licensed Auto Mechanic, Private Pilot, skilled Computer Scientist. Tim “could fix anything”. Afflicted with cancer 2001. ...

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Travel

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup


Rich Robertson/Special to the Town Crier
The sun sets over the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey, left.

Tours that whisk you from Istanbul to Bodrum in 11 days are as plentiful as souvenir hawkers in Turkey, but traveling from the Blue Mosque to Topkapi ...

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Stepping Out

'Gypsy' on its way out

'Gypsy' on its way out


Chris Berger/Special to the Town Crier
Alison Koch of Los Altos plays Dainty June in “Gypsy.”

This is the final weekend to catch the Sunnyvale Community Players production of “Gypsy” at the Sunnyvale Theatre. The musical is slated to close Sund...

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Spiritual Life

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Herman Lukwago educates children in Uganda.

Imagine life if your father had 25 children and you were raised in poverty in rural Uganda.

Now imagine that you and your siblings were orphaned at an early age and you ass...

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Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

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Dental implants: Creating myriad health-restoring opportunities

Courtesy of Dr. Ken schweifler The above illustration identifies the components of a single-tooth implant crown.

If you’re old enough to remember dental treatment prior to the invention and implementation of dental anesthesia in the 1950s, you will be able to relate to my sentiment that nothing up to that point had such a profoundly positive influence on the field.

The ability to block nerve sensation transformed the way we practice, enabling the performance of even the most complex procedures in a pain-free, anxiety-free environment. Perhaps nothing has revolutionized the field of dentistry since as much as dental implants.

In the past, when a single tooth was lost, a typical option would be a fixed bridge. Such treatment relies on the teeth adjacent to the missing tooth, often requiring aggressive reduction of healthy teeth that wouldn’t otherwise need to be restored for their own structural benefit. Because fixed bridges are a series of attached crowns, they preclude the ability to use traditional dental floss. Even though there are hygienic options to thread floss underneath the bridge, the technique requires a high level of dexterity and motivation from the patient. In my experience, most patients don’t spend the time to care for them adequately.

Over time, the bone that supported the lost tooth (or teeth) dissolves, leaving excessive space between the bridge and the tissue below it and contributing to more plaque/food retention and tissue irritation.

Dental implants treat single-tooth problems with single-tooth solutions. An implant designed to replace a single lost tooth has three components: the titanium implant that fuses with the jawbone; the abutment that attaches to the implant and protrudes from the gumline; and the crown (cap) that adheres to the abutment, restoring function and aesthetics.

By avoiding the needless restorative treatment on adjacent teeth that a fixed bridge requires, those teeth are preserved with their longevity more likely. Single-tooth implants can be cleaned just like natural teeth, because nothing impedes the passage of conventional floss. When a tooth is lost and restored with an implant, the immediate replacement root (implant) “tricks” the bone, minimizing bone loss. Due to the overwhelming benefits of implants over fixed bridge treatment, to treat a candidate for implants with a fixed bridge would be considered below the standard of care today.

Another treatment option, usually selected when more teeth are missing than could be treated well with a fixed bridge, is a removable denture (partial or full). A partial denture uses metal clasps to anchor it to the remaining teeth, and acrylic rests in those areas where teeth are missing and serves as the attachment platform for fake teeth. These clasps are often torquing on teeth already periodontally compromised, leading to the acceleration of tooth loss.

Patients with these appliances often complain that they affect speech, impede the sense of taste and create a negative image of old age. Full dentures receive similar complaints, but more pronounced. As multiple teeth are lost, the bony ridge that supported them dissolves.

These patients traditionally have relied on the inadequate retention of acrylic against tissue on a shrinking bony ridge. The upper denture benefits from the suction created against the palate. The lower full denture lacks that anatomic advantage and is commonly considered the most annoying, ineffective treatment in dentistry. Complaints about it have been unanimous in my practice – until now.

Perhaps the most profound benefits of dental implants are in creating more retention for full dentures, especially on the lower arch. By simply placing two implants on the lower bony ridge and creating a denture that adheres to those implants, the days of uncomfortable, restricted chewing and embarrassing slippage of the appliance in social situations are over.

In my experience, reluctance to pursue dental implants has been due primarily to the expense or concerns about failure. Initial treatment for a single-tooth implant is typically more expensive than a fixed bridge or denture, but it’s a much more predictable option that preserves remaining teeth and bone.

Studies show that within five to seven years, there’s a failure rate of 30 percent in teeth adjacent to a fixed bridge or removable partial denture. Sure, a three-unit fixed bridge (to replace one missing tooth) may cost less money than an implant, but if it fails because the teeth supporting it succumb to disease, then it’s going to need to be replaced. If I could add up the cost of replacing a fixed bridge or a partial denture, perhaps several times over a lifetime, dental implants are definitely the more economical option.

Some of my implant candidates express concerns about the risk of failures. I have heard more about implants failing from conversations my patients have had with friends and loved ones than I have ever seen in my practice. The success rate for dental implants varies from study to study, but generally is more than 90 percent, much higher than any other tooth-replacing option.

The impact dental implants have had on the field of dentistry cannot be overstated. We’re fortunate to be living in a time when this technology creates comfortable, health-restoring opportunities.

Dr. Ken Schweifler practices dentistry at 802 Altos Oaks Drive. For more information, call 941-2166 or visit www.dentistlosaltos.com.

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