Wed03042015

News

Council considers freezing First St. development

Council considers freezing First St. development


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
A pedestrian walks along First Street in downtown Los Altos last week. Future construction on the street could soon be barred by an emergency moratorium on development.

Further construction along First Street could be t...

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Schools

Former NFL player huddles with Blach students about life choices

Former NFL player huddles with Blach students about life choices


Ellie Van HOutte/Town Crier
Former NFL tight end Eason Ramson visited with Blach Intermediate School students, Feb. 13 to share the perils of drug use. Now a motivational speaker, Ramson works with at-risk teens in San Francisco.

Although former ...

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Community

Music for Minors partners with Harvard to expand efforts

Music for Minors partners with Harvard to expand efforts


Palmer

When the thriving Music for Minors began to outgrow its capacity, the local nonprofit organization made new friends.

Beginning in late February, Music for Minors – a Town Crier Holiday Fund recipient – partnered with Harvard Business Sch...

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Comment

Dangerous streets: A Piece of My Mind

I’m driving along El Monte Avenue between Foothill Expressway and Springer Road at approximately 6 p.m. on a midwinter evening. In keeping with the “village feeling” of our town, there are no sidewalks and no streetlights.

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Special Sections

Lions, lambs and Cab Franc for March

Lions, lambs and Cab Franc for March


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
Oven fries, a slice of feta cheese and the bite of harissa mayonnaise make for a late-winter, early-spring dinner perfectly paired with Cabernet Franc.

I can’t help but wonder whether March will come in ...

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Business

Los Altos scientist named Inventor of the Year

Los Altos scientist named Inventor of the Year


Above Photo by Alicia Castro/Town Crier; Below Rendering Courtesy of SST inc.
Robert Showen, above, the Silicon Valley Intellectual Property Lawyers Association’s Inventor of the Year, began researching his ShotSpotter technology in his Los A...

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Books

French novel

French novel "Hunting and Gathering" offers character-driven suspense


Anna Gavalda is a well-known author in her native France, where she has published six books, most of which have met with considerable praise and commercial success. Her fourth novel, “Hunting and Gathering” (Riverhead Books, 2007), is filled ...

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People

HELEN KNOFLOCH

HELEN KNOFLOCH

Aug. 14, 1920 – Feb.12, 2015

Resident of Cupertino

Helen Knofloch, 94, loving wife and devoted mother passed away on Feb. 12th. She was born in Vienna, Austria and moved to Los Altos in 1949, where she met Andy, the love of her life. They resided...

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Travel

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new

Seoul of the city: Korean capital offers mix of old and new


Ramya Krishna/Special to the Town Crier
Seoul’s Cheonggyecheon public recreation space, above, features an elevated pedestrian bridge.

Seoul, South Korea, is a study in contrasts. Having grown quickly, the city is a mix of old and new.

Using...

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Stepping Out

TheatreWorks jumps into ‘Lake’

TheatreWorks jumps into ‘Lake’


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Jason Bowen, from left, Adam Poss and Nilanjana Bose star in “The Lake Effect,” opening this weekend at the Lucie Stern Theatre in Palo Alto and running through March 29.

The TheatreWorks production ...

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Spiritual Life

Is your thought life sabotaging your spiritual journey?

My computer started having problems – there seemed to be some sort of malware running in the background. At first it was just annoying, then it began to slow down my computer, interfering with its basic operations. What is it doing? Why can...

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Magazine

Local events serve up family fun

Local events serve up family fun


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Pecos Bill: A Tall Tale” is slated to open March 20 in Mountain View.

For families seeking a break from the daily routine, events abound this month and next in Los Alto...

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Former Los Altan, secretary of defense, discusses U.S., Russia's quest for peace

Four years ago, a job in Washington, D.C., lured William Perry out of his Los Altos residence. That job was secretary of defense, head of the most powerful military force in the world.

Fresh from four years in the Clinton administration, Perry has returned to the Peninsula. He shared his experiences last Wednesday before a packed house at Woodside Priory School in Portola Valley.

As secretary of defense, Perry said he faced numerous challenges, including work on an agreement to reduce the expanding nuclear arsenal.

"Some have said that war is too important to be left solely to the generals. Preventive defense says peace is too important to be left solely to the politicians," Perry told his audience.

After the World War II, the emergence of nuclear weapons created a crisis for many nations and the "concept of deterrence" was adopted as a means of defense, Perry noted.

He was involved with the nuclear weapons reduction agreement between the United States, Russia and the Ukraine, the third largest nuclear power in the world.

Perry helped supervise the Ukraine's nuclear site dismantlement. When he visited the Ukraine, on invitation, he went underground to the Ukraine mission control. Two men controlled 600 nuclear warheads - every one of them directed toward the United States.

Perry went back four times to watch the nuclear site being dismantled.

With the Cold War over, Perry helped build a partnership of peace with the 16 NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) members. Today, NATO members and 26 other countries conduct military training together. Perry cited Fort Polk, La., where the United State hosted American, Latvian, Poles, and Ukrainians training together and being instructed on peacekeeping exercises.

One of the results of this training was a joint endeavor to keep the peace in Bosnia.

"It didn't matter how many countries joined in this endeavor as long as Russia joined," Perry said. "The Russians were not willing to be under a NATO command, but would join under an American Command. In February 1996, a Russian brigade served as part of our first armed brigade. Bosnia still has social problems, but the killings and atrocities have stopped due to NATO's influence."

Perry discussed NATO and how the alliance is undergoing radical change. Among the changes considered are the creation of a new task force to fight outside traditional European grounds, allowing Europeans rather than Americans to command those forces and how to extend security to other parts of Central Europe.

"Russia's public hostility to NATO's enlargement goes back in history, but progress is emerging and may have continued when President Clinton met Boris Yeltsin in Helsinki (last week)," Perry said. "Sensing that Russia may become more realistic and flexible, there is a chance a deal can be made before the alliance meets in Madrid in early July.

"When they meet in July, one of the proposals is NATO expansion. The alliance would like to add seven or eight more nations, but probably only three will make it because Russia thinks adding new members is a bad idea. Probably, Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia will be the favorites," Perry said.

Perry, 69, grew up in Pennsylvania, but received his education at Stanford University. During the time he was professor at Stanford's School of Engineering, he and his family lived in Los Altos. He said he regretted selling his Los Altos home.

"I'm sorry I did," Perry remarked after his speech. "I could sure use it now."

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