Tue09022014

News

A flood of candidates seek seats on high school board

Two incumbents and five newcomers are vying for seats on the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees – a significant increase in the number of candidates who have run over the past 10 years.

According to data from the Sa...

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Schools

One more candidate joins MVLA race

When longtime incumbent Judy Hannemann declined to run again, the deadline to file for the upcoming Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District Board of Trustees election was extended by a few days. Mountain View resident Sanjay Dave registere...

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Community

CSA salutes 'Hometown Heroes' at breakfast

CSA salutes 'Hometown Heroes' at breakfast


Mendoza

The Community Services Agency’s 2014 “Hometown Heroes” fundraising breakfast is scheduled 7:15 a.m. Sept. 19 at the Computer History Museum, 1401 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View.

“Hometown Heroes” honors individuals and businesses for...

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Sports

No suit, no sweat

No suit, no sweat


Courtesy of the Gallagher Family
Joe Gallagher – a 12-year-old from Los Altos Hills – swims from near Alcatraz Island to the San Francisco shore. His uncle, Joe Locke, an accomplished open-water swimmer, accompanied him.

For his recent s...

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Comment

Back to school, back to thumbs: Editorial

The kids are back in class at our local schools and a new political campaign season is underway, so we have our thumbs out and ready to go.

Thumbs-up: To last week’s community workshop for rebuilding the Los Altos Community Center. The Aug. 19...

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Business

Sweet Shop celebrates five-year anniversary

Sweet Shop celebrates five-year anniversary


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
The Sweet Shop at 994 Los Altos Ave. marks its fifth year in business Sept. 7. The shop is a popular after-school stop for families and students.

When Stacy Savides Sullivan opened the Sweet Shop at 994 Los Altos...

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Books

"Jack London" chronicles author's adventurous life


Much has been written about American author Jack London, primarily known for his early-20th-century Western adventure novels, including the classics “White Fang” and “The Call of the Wild.”

In Earle Labor’s biography of the literary icon, “Jac...

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People

JEFF JOHNSON

JEFF JOHNSON

Jan 10, 1967 - Aug 10, 2014

Jeff was born and raised in Los Altos. He was a graduate of Los Altos High School. He then went to Foothill College where he had an opportunity to spend 3-months in Europe through a study abroad program. That experience...

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Travel

Visiting Vancouver Western Canada's premier destination has much to offer

Visiting Vancouver Western Canada's premier destination has much to offer


Photos courtesy of TOURISM VANCOUVER
Outdoor adventures abound in and around Vancouver, including a boat excursion into Horseshoe Bay and a jaunt on the Cliffwalk at Capilano Suspension Bridge Park, among the most popular attractions in British Col...

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Stepping Out

'Water' rises in Mtn. View

'Water' rises in Mtn. View


Kevin Berne/Special to the Town Crier
Elliot (Miles Gaston Villanueva) struggles to understand Odessa’s (Zilah Mendoza) online activity in TheatreWorks’ regional premiere of the award-winning drama “Water by the Spoonful.”

TheatreWorks’ regiona...

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Spiritual Life

Spiritual Briefs

Meditation group meets at Foothills Congregational

A Weekly Meditation Practice group meets 7-8:15 a.m. Tuesdays at Foothills Congregational Church, 461 Orange Ave., Los Altos.

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Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host o...

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Build it and the birds will come

Photo Jim Howard/Special To The Town Crier Running water from a fountain attracts an array of birds to any backyard. Placing the water feature near a shrub gives the birds somewhere to flee if they fear a predator nearby.

 

Five years ago, Jim and Meredith Howard bought a 1971 slab house with a flat concrete-paved backyard in the Bay Area and began transforming it into a habitat garden.

They wanted to create an interesting and functional space that attracted native birds and insects, learn the local native plants, improve drainage and do it all on a budget without wasting materials or hauling truckloads to the landfill.

At a recent Gardening with Natives talk, Jim Howard demonstrated how they did it. As the district conservationist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in San Mateo County, Howard was already attuned to nature, but the South Bay environment was new.

Starting with the front yard, the Howards consulted with Acterra, a restoration nursery, to choose appropriate native plants. Because the goal was to attract wildlife, they focused on species rather than cultivars.

“You don’t know what you’re breeding out and what ecological functions you’re impairing” if you use a hybrid or cultivar, Howard said.

For instance, he said, monkeyflowers bred or selected for larger, more colorful flowers are less attractive to hummingbirds than the ones found in nature. But, he noted, ceanothus and salvia cultivars seem to be as full of insect life as the species.

“We couldn’t believe how quickly” and how many birds found the garden, he said.

Birds came instantly when they installed the native plants.

They noted a huge increase after adding a water feature. Following Audubon Society recommendations, they placed the water feature within 10 feet of a shrub where birds could seek cover to elude predators.

“There’s always something going on in the yard,” Howard said.

Bushtits, for instance, will consume 40 percent of the bugs in a mature shrub. California Towhees especially like purple needlegrass seeds. Howard has observed a Townsend’s Warbler eating caterpillars from hummingbird sage plants and robins resting under yellow lupines. At least 37 species of birds visit the garden. Though crows, jays and ravens populate the neighborhood, they don’t come to this garden.

The biggest task was to improve drainage in the backyard. The Howards rented an electric pavement breaker to cut the tons of concrete into slabs, many of which they dry stacked into raised beds and used for stepping-stones. For the rain garden, they dug a hole and filled it with cobble-sized concrete chunks and then gravel, topped by geotextile. The rain garden has successfully let rainwater soak into the soil onsite rather than pooling or flowing into the street.

Howard offered advice for others contemplating an ecosystem restoration garden.

• Stick to natives. Native plants are the best food source for native insects and other wildlife.

• Go for complexity of structure, flower color and flower type. Use shrubs, trees, ground covers and perennials that offer a range of habitat niches. A variety of flowers will attract different pollinators.

• Do whatever you can. Start small, but start somewhere. It took only three summers for the Howards’ garden to look “done.”

• Learn as you go.

“You could spend a lifetime investigating what to do and know less than when you started,” he said.

Don’t be afraid to experiment.

Tanya Kucak gardens organically. E-mail her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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