Sun07052015

News

Effective today, library cards free again in Los Altos

Both Los Altos libraries should see a spike in use soon. After the elimination of an $80 annual card fee that had been in place since 2011, nonresidents will receive free library cards at local libraries, effective today.

Residents of Mountain View ...

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Schools

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline

Almond fifth-graders set sail at Shoreline


Courtesy of Corinne Finegan Machatzke
Fifth- graders at Almond School launched the boats they designed and built at Shoreline Lake last month.

Almond School fifth-graders boarded their handmade boats at Shoreline Lake in Mountain View last month to...

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Community

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'

Taking it back to 'The Streets': Local filmmaker aims to revive 1970s series 'Streets of San Francisco'


Courtesy of Charles Alley
Charles Alley’s filmmaking company may be based in Mountain View, but he knows all about “The Streets of San Francisco.” He’s rebooting the 1970s TV classic.

When people look for the next hit TV show, they often assume ...

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Sports

Enjoying the moment


Courtesy of Dick D’OlivA
Former Golden State Warriors trainer Dick D’Oliva, from left, wife Vi, former Warriors assistant coach Joe Roberts and wife Celia ride on a cable car in the victory parade.

Dick D’Oliva almost couldn’...

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Comment

The death knell of suburbia: A Piece of My Mind

The orchards are gone. The single-story ranch house is seen as a waste of valuable land and air space. An eight-lane freeway thunders past the bridle paths in Los Altos Hills. But nothing has signaled the death of suburbia more strongly than the ann...

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Special Sections

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors

While competent & safe, MKC still can't catch European competitors


courtesy of Ford
The 2015 Lincoln MKC doesn’t overwhelm as far as overall performance goes, but it does offer comfortable ride quality.

Of all the auto companies with headquarters in the United States, only Ford managed to weather the great re...

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Business

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS

Company installs EV charging stations at LAHS


Courtesy of Green Charge
Officials from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District celebrate the installation of electric-vehicle charging stations at Los Altos High last week.

The Mountain View Los Alto...

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Books

People

HILDA CLAIRE FENTON

Hilda Claire Fenton, beloved wife and mom to 9, grandmother to 30 and great grandmother to 22, passed away June 20 following a long illness. She was 90.

Hilda was born Sept. 28, 1924, to Lois and Gus Farley then of Logan, W. Va. While she was still ...

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Travel

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress

Venetian spa offers ways to de-stress


Courtesy of The VEnetian
The HydroSpa in the Canyon Ranch SpaClub at The Venetian in Las Vegas offers a muscle-relaxing bath and radiant lounge chairs.

Vegas cab drivers usually ask if you won or lost as soon as you get in their vehicles. They assum...

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Stepping Out

Cast carries 'Arcadia'

Cast carries 'Arcadia'


Courtesy of Pear Avenue Theatre
“Arcadia” stars Monica Ammerman and Robert Sean Campbell.

The intimate setting of Mountain View’s Pear Avenue Theatre proves the perfect place to stage “Arcadia,” allowing audience members to feel as though they a...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place

Living it up Older adults aim to age in place


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Local enthusiasts flock to the Los Altos Senior Center to play bocce ball. The center hosts informal games four days a week and occasional tournaments.

As baby boomers in Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View nose...

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Inside Mountain View

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch


Members of the Mountain View Police Department carry the Special Olympics torch as they run along El Camino Real between Sunnyvale and Palo Alto June 18. Members of the department participate in the relay annually to show their support for Spec...

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Travel in Turkey offers culinary delights

Photo Leyna Lightman/Special To The Town Crier Diners in Istanbul eat at Hotel Les Ottomans' Bistro Funfatale, which offers grilled portobello mushrooms and rib-eye steak.

 

Some people visit Turkey for the ruins. I go for the food.

Every year, I return to my native land hungry for the meatballs, kebabs, pilaf, dolmas, baklavas and boreks of my youth. The dishes all have poetic titles, like “The Priest Fainted,” a stewed eggplant entrée, or my Aunt Çolpan’s Kadin Budu Köfte, which means “Fried Lady Meatballs.” They provide a gastronomical feast for the taste buds.

OK, the awe-inspiring views, art and Istanbul nightlife beckon to me, as well.

However, a big part of the draw is Proustian, triggered by the sight of the ubiquitous tulip tea glasses balanced on swinging trays. I long for the food that fed an empire.

American newspapers report that Turkey may be turning East to cash in on relationships with its neighbors, in response to the European Union’s unwillingness to accept the country into its 27-member club. For decades, however, Turkey has been knocking at Europe’s door. The fallout from trying so hard to get cozy with Europe includes Julia Child-inspired dishes served in upscale restaurants that no longer resemble Turkish cultural heritage.

According to my book on Ottoman cookery, Turkish cuisine draws from the countries that were once under Ottoman rule, encompassing the Balkans, the Aegean, the Caucasus, Syria, Lebanon and Anatolia.

During a recent voyage to attend my brother’s big Turkish wedding at the Marmara Esma Sultan, I searched desperately for the breakfasts of my mother’s kitchen. I envisioned an elegant feast of feta and kasar cheeses, shriveled black olives, crusty bread and bowls of fruit preserves made from sour cherries, oranges and strawberries.

My first attempt was the House Café, 1 Salhane Sokak, Ortaköy, where the “Turkish breakfast, with tea” costs $12. Other menu selections included mista and Caesar salads and, yes, that American favorite, mac and cheese.

The curmudgeonly waiter served me a plate of French and Dutch hard cheeses easily found in the deli cooler at Draeger’s and some dainty artisanal bread. The blackboard menu advertised dietetic items with fresh, organic produce “to keep you fit.” I could have driven to San Francisco.

Another morning, we ventured into the posh “Kitchen” at the W Hotel in the newly renovated Akaratler district, where we were staying. Built by Sultan Abdulaziz in 1875, this neighborhood of row houses used to shelter manual laborers from the nearby Dolmabahçe Palace. Now the area includes designer shops like Marc Jacobs, and Haremlique, where you can buy thick Turkish towels for sky-high prices.

The W Kitchen listed a $25 Turkish breakfast, which also came with hard French and Dutch cheeses and artisanal breads, as well as tablespoonfuls of whipped butter to spread on them. Several large olives dominated the plate, but they were green-pitted and Kalamata varieties, more suited to salads. Although it included watermelon and cucumber and tomato chunks, this was not my mother’s breakfast, either.

When I told my mother, who was hosting wedding guests, how hard it was to get a decent breakfast, she suggested the cay bahçesi (tea garden) at the Kanlica dock. It was on the Asian side of the Bosphorus and we were on the European side, so we didn’t make it.

If we didn’t have a local guide, the Çiya Kebapçi in Kadikoy would have been too hard to find. But we made it through meandering, narrow streets – and the menu was worth it. Here, one could sample cooking from different regions of Turkey, like the casserole from Diyarbakir, the sour-cherry meatballs from Malatya and the bean dishes from Antioch and Adana. There are three different Çiya restaurants, all specializing in different food.

I hesitated to enter the kebapcis we passed, but we found tasty meatballs, or köfte, at the historic Sultanahmet köfteci (sultanahmentköftesi.com), 12 Divonyolo Caddesi. We also sampled an excellent çoban, or shepherd’s salad, and lamb shish kebabs, served with fried potatoes, all at reasonable prices. Shepherd’s salad, a staple in Turkish homes, includes chopped green peppers, onions and tomatoes. Another favorite is Turkish pizza, or lahmacun, which is thinner and less saucy than the American version.

On the way home, we saw the Besiktas fish markets, where one can buy fish sandwiches on baguettes. The vendors always take the time to arrange fish artfully, and one stall displayed small, open-mouthed whiting splayed like silver commas atop the biggest grapevine leaves I’ve ever seen. Most fish is sauteéd with butter and onions and accompanied by raki, which is called “Lion’s Milk” when mixed with water. Raki also accompanies the meze, or appetizers of cheeses and hummus or eggplant puree.

We often drank ayran, a yogurt drink, at fast-food places invariably marked by the name Palace, like Simit Palace, which serves the legendary pretzel-like bread covered in sesame seeds. These places seemed to offer cheaper food, more traditional fare eaten by the natives, not tourists.

I couldn’t leave Turkey without visiting Istiklal Street to buy pistachio lokum, or Turkish Delight, and badem ezmesi, almond paste, at the Haci Bekir pastry shop, founded in 1777.

More and more, some Turkish movers and shakers seem to have the attitude of “Who needs Europe?” At least in the culinary arena, they may have a point.

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