Wed10012014

News

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics


The Town Crier chronicled the first election of Los Altos City Council incumbent Jarrett Fishpaw in 2010 and documented the Los Altos candidacy of Jean Mordo, who volunteered as a longtime public servant in Los Altos Hills before moving to the flat...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system


Courtesy of St. Simon Parish School
St. Simon fifth-grader Matthew Cummins uses a laptop in class last week. The school’s cloud-based Schoology system boosts organization and collaboration.

Families at St. Simon Parish School in Los Altos laun...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos main library is among the more popular branches in the county library district system, set to celebrate 100 years.

In 1914, Babe Ruth made his debut with the Boston Red Sox, wages hit $5 per day, the first ste...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Eagles eye another stellar season

Eagles eye another stellar season


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High outside hitter Carmen Annevelink, right, goes for the kill Thursday against Palo Alto, as teammates Sarah Tritschler, left, and Lulu Kishton prepare to play defense. The Eagles won the match in straight ga...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Torok, Walter, Dave for MVLA board: Editorial

There’s really nothing major you can criticize about the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District. It offers a diverse array of effective programs for all types of students. Its instructors, with few exceptions, are outstanding.

Howe...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Funabout' Fiat

'Funabout' Fiat


Photos courtesy of Fiat
The 2014 Fiat 500e uses 29 kilowatt-hours per 100 miles, which the engineers claim is the equivalent of 116 mpg of gas use. It has a sticker price of $33,095.

If you believe in climate change, would love to see alternat...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground


Ted Fagenson

An East Bay app developer is testing his newest creation in downtown Los Altos.

Ted Fagenson, co-founder of Skrownge (pronounced “scrounge”), told the Town Crier that he’s beta testing his mobile gaming app this week ...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween


Courtesy of Dee Ellmann
Jenny Hurwick self-published her picture book last month after decades of storytelling.

During her years working as a teacher and a Los Altos mom, Jenny Hurwick loved to tell stories. One tale she crafted for her son just se...

Read more:

Loading...

People

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

July 27, 1953 – August 12, 2014

Native Los Altan died Medford, OR. Graduated Bellarmine Prep. Married Josephine Domino, 1950. Licensed Auto Mechanic, Private Pilot, skilled Computer Scientist. Tim “could fix anything”. Afflicted with cancer 2001. ...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup


Rich Robertson/Special to the Town Crier
The sun sets over the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey, left.

Tours that whisk you from Istanbul to Bodrum in 11 days are as plentiful as souvenir hawkers in Turkey, but traveling from the Blue Mosque to Topkapi ...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Gypsy' on its way out

'Gypsy' on its way out


Chris Berger/Special to the Town Crier
Alison Koch of Los Altos plays Dainty June in “Gypsy.”

This is the final weekend to catch the Sunnyvale Community Players production of “Gypsy” at the Sunnyvale Theatre. The musical is slated to close Sund...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Herman Lukwago educates children in Uganda.

Imagine life if your father had 25 children and you were raised in poverty in rural Uganda.

Now imagine that you and your siblings were orphaned at an early age and you ass...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

Read more:

Loading...

Circus with a smile

For John Gilkey of Los Altos, Cirque du Soleil success is classic 'revenge of the nerds'

No one expected a few awkward dance steps to catapult John Gilkey to the big top after he dropped out of college to pursue his childhood passion and run away with the circus.

But using his shortcomings to achieve the extraordinary is something Gilkey has done most of his life.

Being a "dork" has paid off, Gilkey said.

Disguised by a white-powdered face, upswept eyebrows and a single tuft of spiked hair atop his head, the Los Altos native has been entertaining audiences nationwide with his animated gestures and circus tricks for the past 18 months as ringmaster of Cirque du Soleil's latest production, "Quidam," which opened in San Jose July 31.

"I got lumped in with a whole bunch of dancers (at the 1994 audition) which was scary because I'm not a dancer," Gilkey said.

"So I took my little place in the back and tried to keep from getting kicked in the face, and they liked that. They liked the goofy guy who kept trying to keep up with all of the dancers."

Gilkey and the 50-member circus troupe from "Quidam" will have performed 1,000 shows, in front of more than 2.5 million people in 13 cities by 1998 - the end of the production's three-year run in North America.

The renowned French-Canadian company is known for reinventing the three-ringed circus by combining the traditional circus arts, such as flying acrobats, with cabaret-style acts, outrageous costumes and live music in its all-human productions.

Cirque du Soleil has thrilled more than 15 million spectators in 123 countries around the world and has won numerous awards including an Emmy, since it began in 1984.

Gilkey said Cirque du Soleil celebrates the "human person doing superhuman activities."

For Gilkey, circus tricks provided him a way to be accepted by his peers in junior high school.

"You want to be good at something when you're a kid," Gilkey said. "Well when you're dorky, skinny, have glasses and braces, football ain't the best choice. I chose juggling."

Gilkey began performing in school shows, company parties, and by age 18 had even won first place at the International Jugglers Association annual convention.

After graduating from Homestead High School in Sunnyvale in 1985, Gilkey enrolled at the University of California, Santa Cruz, where he expected to graduate and become some kind of scientist, he said.

Gilkey said dividing his time between studying and performing was too difficult and college "just wasn't doing it" for him.

He dropped out of school after his first year and gave himself an ultimatum. "If I wasn't performing in two years, I would go back to school," he said.

With a lot of hard work and some luck, Gilkey was touring with the Pickle Family Circus within a year. This led him to study acrobats which later earned him stints with the Tandy Beal Dance Company and other performance groups.

Gilkey was first introduced to Cirque du Soleil in 1987 when the show came to Los Angeles as part of the city's theater festival.

"I was taken aback, overwhelmed and wowed," Gilkey said. "It was clear to me that (Cirque du Soleil) was something I wanted to do eventually."

Gilkey said after performing 10 shows a week, six days a week since 1996, staying fresh has become the most difficult aspect of circus life.

"I work to find something new to surprise myself as well as the audience," Gilkey said. "The audience sees when you've done something a billion times before and you're not into it. It makes a difference between a pretty darn good show and an amazing experience."

Gilkey said he warms up several hours before each show by studying video tapes of his last performance and preparing himself mentally.

Gilkey said no matter how much he prepares for a show, his act always involves some improvisation.

"After 500 shows, things do go wrong," Gilkey said while reminiscing about the tour. He said the sound died out during a show in Oakland, requiring his otherwise silent character to sing. Gilkey said one time he almost drove his scooter into the audience. And another time, he caught a dart in the back of the head by mistake.

In Quidam, Gilkey guides the audience through the show which centers around a young girl who embarks on a series of adventures with a headless giant.

Between the clown stunts and the aerial, high-flying, balancing and manipulation acts, audiences are entertained by Gilkey's comical vignettes. He throws darts, twirls hoops, taunts the audience and mimics Fred Astaire's dance with a coat rack in Royal Wedding.

Gilkey said he didn't learn any of his stunts at a "circus school." He said performing simply takes practice and imagination. Gilkey said he used to lock himself in his room, stand in front of a mirror and practice several hours a day.

As ringmaster, Gilkey said he is responsible for keeping the show down-to-earth.

"I provide a bit of a wink," Gilkey said. "It would be very easy for the show to become pretentious if we didn't have someone winking at the audience and telling them we know we're taking ourselves a little too seriously."

Gilkey said every city responds to the show differently. So far he has had a warm homecoming in San Jose..

"Coming back is great but scary," Gilkey said. "All of my friends are coming to the shows. I have to do good every show, It's hard not screwing up.

"Quidam" will play at the San Jose Water Company at 374 West Santa Clara St. through Sept. 14. Performances are scheduled at 8 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays; 6 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Fridays; 4:30 p.m.. and 8:30 p.m. Saturdays; and 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. Sundays. For more information call (800) 678-5440.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos