Wed07292015

News

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water says no E. coli in water; limits boiling advisory area

Cal Water officials said today that preliminary water quality test results were negative for E. coli were negative and "only a single hydrant" in the South El Monte area of Los Altos showed the presence of total coliform. They reduced the "boil your ...

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Schools

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students

Foothill STEM camps offer resources for low-income students


Sana Khader/Town Crier
Students use software connected to a 3D printer, left, to create a miniature San Francisco, including the Ferry Building, below, at Foothill’s STEM Summer Camps.

Expanding efforts to spark and inspire students’ int...

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Community

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters

Local resident cooks her way from cheerleader to Food Fighters


Courtesy of the MacDonald family
Amber MacDonald competes on an episode of “Food Fighters,” scheduled to air 8 p.m. Thursday on NBC.

A newly arrived Los Altos family has an unusually public get-to-know-you moment this week – Amber MacDonald and ...

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Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ad-plane flyover marred festival

I hope that other residents who share my concern that the Geico plane flying low over the Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival and our homes for hours on end marred the “fun for everyone” that the Town Crie...

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Special Sections

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience

Heart attack survivor cherishes life after near-death experience


Photos Courtesy of Tim Pierce
Los Altos Hills resident Tim Pierce, right with emergency medical responder Steve Crowley, suffered a heart attack in May.

After what Tim Pierce went through recently, no wonder he tries to cherish every moment as if he...

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Business

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center

PAMF debuts cosmetic surgery center


John Ho/Special to the Town Crier
The Palo Alto Medical Foundation Center for Cosmetic Surgery at 715 Altos Oaks Drive is the organization’s first center focused solely on cosmetic procedures.

Los Altos’ newest medical office – the...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Engineer builds second career as actor

Engineer builds second career as actor


David Allen/Special to the Town Crier
Actors rehearse for Foothill Music Theatre’s “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.” The cast includes, from left, Tomas Theriot, Todd Wright, Mike Meadors and Ray D’Ambrosio. ...

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Spiritual Life

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF

Christ Episcopal pastor departs Los Altos for new post in SF


Courtesy of Sara BoaDwee
Christ Episcopal Church celebrated the ministry of the Rev. Dr. Malcolm Young and his wife, Heidi, at a farewell luau June 28.

Members and friends of Christ Episcopal Church bid farewell June 28 to the Rev. Dr. Malcolm C. Yo...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Solar – a step-by-step alternative: Smaller and affordable installations make green energy viable

Photo Courtesy Of Jose RadzinskyFor property owners who want to try solar power without a substantial monetary investment, Renewable Power Solutions Inc. offers step-by-step alternatives such as a six-panel installation on the roof of a garden shed.

For homeowners considering installing solar panels but wary of the expense, Jose Radzinsky, president and CEO of Renewable Power Solutions Inc., suggests starting with a baby step: install just a few panels, enough to power one or two appliances, to determine whether solar power is the best choice.

Renewable Power Solutions offers an affordable introduction to solar power. As an alternative to its full-scale installations, the company installs three to six solar panels, enough to generate approximately 1.2 kilowatts of electricity. Later, if the homeowner is satisfied with the results from the first installation, Solutions can continue to expand the system in small steps.

According to Radzinsky, the cost depends somewhat on the roof type. Composition or wood shingles are easy to work with, he said, but tile roofs are more complicated. Before rebates, the cost varies from approximately $7,200 to $7,500, with the after-rebate price approximately $5,000. The only factor likely to prevent a rebate would be a tax lien on the property. Renewable Power Solutions charges the customer the after-rebate price, then the company prepares the rebate paperwork and keeps the rebate check when it comes.

Tax incentives and energy-bill savings would eventually offset the $5,000 cost of the installation, Radzinsky said, with expected electricity-bill savings totaling $35-$40 per month. The 1.2-kilowatt system would power one or two appliances, depending on the amount of power the homeowner draws.

Homeowners would still pay PG&E for electricity, but a lower amount. These are “grid-tie” systems – electricity generated from the solar panels would be delivered to the PG&E power grid via a meter and make the meter spin backward, or at least go forward more slowly. That is, the homeowner would receive financial credit for making power and would reduce his or her carbon footprint.

The power the solar panels generate would not be stored, and the homeowner would remain dependent on PG&E’s power grid. If PG&E power goes down, National Electric Code safety restrictions would prevent the solar panels’ inverters from delivering power, even to the owners of solar-powered setups. The grid-tie system is the most common installation type. The more expensive alternative, the backup power system, stores electricity in batteries for emergencies.

“We are trying very hard to make solar and being green affordable,” Radzinsky said.

For more information, call (408) 998-7400 or visit www.RPS-Solar.com.

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