Sun02072016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

Read more:

Loading...

People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

Read more:

Loading...

Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

Read more:

Loading...

LAHS program branches out to more schools

Photo Courtesy Of Robert Freeman

Community members pose outside a recently built schoolhouse in the village of Naro Moru in Kenya. Funds raised last year by the One Dollar For Life program made the construction of the schoolhouse possible. The building on the right is an example of the previous school facilities.

A supersize upgrade at a fast-food restaurant, a soda in a vending machine, a song on iTunes - one dollar to a local student translates into much more to a student in an impoverished nation.

This idea, which originated in a Los Altos High School classroom, has blossomed into a growing effort to have every high school student in the United States donate one dollar each year to assist those students.

One Dollar For Life began at Los Altos High last year when economics teacher Robert Freeman challenged his students to believe they are not as helpless as they feel.

"I challenged them to think, ‘You are not as impotent as you want to make yourself out to be. You have a self-imposed impotence. You don't have to be cynical, you could be compassionate.'"

One Dollar For Life is a non-profit organization, founded to address third-world poverty by collecting one dollar from each of millions of U.S. high school students and channeling those funds into small-scale infrastructure projects in developing countries.

Freeman's mission was a success. Last year Los Altos High School launched the program and raised $2,400, more than $1 per student. The program spread last year to Gunn and St. Francis high schools locally and two schools in Bakersfield.

The program works with qualified non-governmental organizations in the developing world to fund and implement such projects as schools, water wells, irrigation systems, sanitary waste disposal, vaccinations and other simple, low-cost projects. These projects have the potential of dramatically improving the quality of life for millions of people.

This year the non-profit organization, armed with a new Web site geared to making it easy for schools throughout the nation to join the effort, is well on its way to doubling the money raised last year. Freeman said there are 20 schools in various stages of the fundraising effort for this academic school year.

Freeman and several local students, who promoted the campaign, delivered last year's proceeds to the village of Naro Moru in Kenya in April. The $9,000 was enough to construct a 25-by-25-foot classroom for the Kenyan students who had been attending classes in a horse barn. Freeman said the village was transformed by the addition, and many community members provided the labor for the projects.

"It is a moral imperative to support this," Freeman said. "We can mitigate so much suffering for so little. $9,000 goes so far out there."

Los Altos High's fundraiser, held in September this year, raised $2,682, averaging about $1.62 per student.

One Dollar For Life recently received two matching grants from private individuals, which will contribute toward building a women's health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Other projects in planning stages include a school in Mexico, three cows for an orphanage in Kenya, a high school in Nepal and a girls' school in Tanzania.

Freeman said the success of One Dollar For Life depends on getting the word spread to as many high schools as possible.

"It is just so simple and inherently good," he said. "Teens always say they want to do something to change the world – this is the easy way to do it."

For the program to be a success at a high school, Freeman said the school needs at least one dedicated teacher and one dedicated student. He said that once the word spreads about One Dollar For Life, the program will catch on at all high schools as an annual fundraiser.

"I really believe this is going to get to a point where this is going to be a brand name – everyone is going to do ODFL," Freeman said. "Students want to feel they are effective. They have this altruism and they want to believe this world can be better. This is a way to make a better world."

For more information, visit www.odfl.org

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos