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News

Hills man arrested on molestation charges

Hills man arrested on molestation charges

Gregory Helfrich

Santa Clara Sheriff’s detectives have arrested a Los Altos Hills man they suspect repeatedly molested a child decades ago.

Detectives arrested Gregory Helfrich, 54, on a warrant at his Old Page Mill Road home April 27 and...

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Schools

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students


Courtesy of Jessica Harell
Blach Intermediate School seventh-grader Paris Harrell, who loves science and animals, recently received a scholarship from the local branch of the AAUW to attend Tech Trek camp.

It’s not every day that a junior hig...

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Community

At 98, former language teacher remains a lifelong learner

At 98, former language teacher remains a lifelong learner


Federici

Longtime Los Altos resident Mario Federici, who turned 98 Feb. 24, is a man of many languages. He shared his knowledge with thousands of students during his long career as a teacher.

Federici was born and raised in Italy, where he stud...

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Comment

Attend an event, get involved, have fun: Editorial

You don’t have to run for city council to get involved in the community. Sometimes it can be as simple as attending a Los Altos event. You’ll have plenty of opportunities, as the May and June calendars are bustling with activity.

The Dow...

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Special Sections

Racing around Monterey

Racing around Monterey


Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier
The easy handling of the VW Golf R, above, makes for an ideal ride along the Big Sur coast.

 

When automotive journalists are asked to list their favorite places in the world to drive, Monterey alway...

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Business

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations


Courtesy of Eureka
Eureka, a new restaurant in downtown Mountain View, highlights local craft beer and whiskeys on a menu of food spanning from sea to farm.

Craft beer and fancy whiskeys headline the menu at Eureka, the new restaurant that opene...

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People

Stepping Out

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'


Courtesy of Palo Alto Players
The Baker’s Wife, left, and Cinderella’s erstwhile Prince stand out in the Palo Alto Players production of “Into the Woods.”

Little Red Riding Hood sets forth at the outset of “Into the...

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Spiritual Life

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International


Courtesy of Los ALtos United Methodist Church
Hidden Villa will bring some of its farm animals to Los Altos United Methodist Church Sunday to support the nonprofit Heifer International.

Los Altos United Methodist Church is scheduled to salute th...

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LAHS program branches out to more schools

Photo Courtesy Of Robert Freeman

Community members pose outside a recently built schoolhouse in the village of Naro Moru in Kenya. Funds raised last year by the One Dollar For Life program made the construction of the schoolhouse possible. The building on the right is an example of the previous school facilities.

A supersize upgrade at a fast-food restaurant, a soda in a vending machine, a song on iTunes - one dollar to a local student translates into much more to a student in an impoverished nation.

This idea, which originated in a Los Altos High School classroom, has blossomed into a growing effort to have every high school student in the United States donate one dollar each year to assist those students.

One Dollar For Life began at Los Altos High last year when economics teacher Robert Freeman challenged his students to believe they are not as helpless as they feel.

"I challenged them to think, ‘You are not as impotent as you want to make yourself out to be. You have a self-imposed impotence. You don't have to be cynical, you could be compassionate.'"

One Dollar For Life is a non-profit organization, founded to address third-world poverty by collecting one dollar from each of millions of U.S. high school students and channeling those funds into small-scale infrastructure projects in developing countries.

Freeman's mission was a success. Last year Los Altos High School launched the program and raised $2,400, more than $1 per student. The program spread last year to Gunn and St. Francis high schools locally and two schools in Bakersfield.

The program works with qualified non-governmental organizations in the developing world to fund and implement such projects as schools, water wells, irrigation systems, sanitary waste disposal, vaccinations and other simple, low-cost projects. These projects have the potential of dramatically improving the quality of life for millions of people.

This year the non-profit organization, armed with a new Web site geared to making it easy for schools throughout the nation to join the effort, is well on its way to doubling the money raised last year. Freeman said there are 20 schools in various stages of the fundraising effort for this academic school year.

Freeman and several local students, who promoted the campaign, delivered last year's proceeds to the village of Naro Moru in Kenya in April. The $9,000 was enough to construct a 25-by-25-foot classroom for the Kenyan students who had been attending classes in a horse barn. Freeman said the village was transformed by the addition, and many community members provided the labor for the projects.

"It is a moral imperative to support this," Freeman said. "We can mitigate so much suffering for so little. $9,000 goes so far out there."

Los Altos High's fundraiser, held in September this year, raised $2,682, averaging about $1.62 per student.

One Dollar For Life recently received two matching grants from private individuals, which will contribute toward building a women's health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Other projects in planning stages include a school in Mexico, three cows for an orphanage in Kenya, a high school in Nepal and a girls' school in Tanzania.

Freeman said the success of One Dollar For Life depends on getting the word spread to as many high schools as possible.

"It is just so simple and inherently good," he said. "Teens always say they want to do something to change the world – this is the easy way to do it."

For the program to be a success at a high school, Freeman said the school needs at least one dedicated teacher and one dedicated student. He said that once the word spreads about One Dollar For Life, the program will catch on at all high schools as an annual fundraiser.

"I really believe this is going to get to a point where this is going to be a brand name – everyone is going to do ODFL," Freeman said. "Students want to feel they are effective. They have this altruism and they want to believe this world can be better. This is a way to make a better world."

For more information, visit www.odfl.org

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