Thu04242014

News

Paws-itively  ready for  disaster

Paws-itively ready for disaster


Dozens of local residents participated in the Pet Ready! program, which included first-aid tips for animals from Adobe Animal Hospital veterinarian Dr. Cristi Blackwolf, above right. Girl Scouts Rachel Torgunrud, above left, in purple of Sunnyv...

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Schools

Local students earn honors at Tech Challenge

Local students earn honors at Tech Challenge


Courtesy of Ann Hepenstal
Gardner Bullis School’s Tech Challenge Team “Fantastic V,” above, recently showed their project at the school’s STEM Expo. Teammates, from left, Brandon Son, Will Hooper, George Weale, Tripp Crissma...

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Community

Merchants, maypoles, music: Farmers' Market season launches May 1

Merchants, maypoles, music: Farmers' Market season launches May 1


Town Crier File Photo
Visitors examine the fresh produce on display at last year’s Downtown Los Altos Farmers’ Market.

It wouldn’t be spring without the return of the Downtown Los Altos Farmers’ Market May 1. The Los Altos Village Association sp...

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Sports

LA tops MV behind Beutter's big day

LA tops MV behind Beutter's big day


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High pitcher Lizzie Beutter went the distance to earn the win against Mountain View.

The number of Los Altos High hits and Mountain View High errors may be in dispute, but there’s no debating which softball ...

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Comment

Enlightened California: No Shoes, Please

I recently read a newspaper article about the newly adopted sex-education curriculum in the state of Mississippi. In the city of Oxford, the following exercise is included: Students pass around a Peppermint Patty chocolate and observe how spoiled it ...

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Business

Cobblery makes short move next door: Longtime business relocating to State Street in May

Cobblery makes short move next door: Longtime business relocating to State Street in May


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
European Cobblery owner Paul Roth is relocating his business from 201 First St., above, to 385 State St. in May.

The European Cobblery, a family-owned and -operated shoe store, is relocating to a new home just a f...

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Books

Local Author Spotlight

In an effort to support authors from Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, many self-published, Book Buzz periodically spotlights their books and offers information on where to purchase them. Local authors are encouraged to submit brief summa...

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People

'Champions for Youth' announced

Challenge Team will honor Mountain View Police Chief Scott Vermeer as “Champion for Youth” at the nonprofit organization’s annual fundraising breakfast, scheduled 7 a.m. May 7 at Michaels at Shoreline, 2960 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View.

Lauren ...

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Stepping Out

Last go-round for 'Hound'

Last go-round for 'Hound'


Tracy Martin/Special to the Town Crier
The actors in “The Hound of the Baskervilles” – from left, Darren Bridgett, Ron Campbell and Michael Gene Sullivan – take on dozens of roles.

TheatreWorks is slated to present “The Hound of the Baskervilles...

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Spiritual Life

Magazine

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away

A yoga class a day keeps the stress away


Van Houtte/Town Crier Yoga of Los Altos hosts a variety of classes, including Strong Flow Vinyasa, above, taught by Doron Hanoch. Yin Yoga instructor Janya Wongsopa guides a student in the practice, below.

It’s nearly 9 a.m. on a Monday mornin...

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LAHS program branches out to more schools

Photo Courtesy Of Robert Freeman

Community members pose outside a recently built schoolhouse in the village of Naro Moru in Kenya. Funds raised last year by the One Dollar For Life program made the construction of the schoolhouse possible. The building on the right is an example of the previous school facilities.

A supersize upgrade at a fast-food restaurant, a soda in a vending machine, a song on iTunes - one dollar to a local student translates into much more to a student in an impoverished nation.

This idea, which originated in a Los Altos High School classroom, has blossomed into a growing effort to have every high school student in the United States donate one dollar each year to assist those students.

One Dollar For Life began at Los Altos High last year when economics teacher Robert Freeman challenged his students to believe they are not as helpless as they feel.

"I challenged them to think, ‘You are not as impotent as you want to make yourself out to be. You have a self-imposed impotence. You don't have to be cynical, you could be compassionate.'"

One Dollar For Life is a non-profit organization, founded to address third-world poverty by collecting one dollar from each of millions of U.S. high school students and channeling those funds into small-scale infrastructure projects in developing countries.

Freeman's mission was a success. Last year Los Altos High School launched the program and raised $2,400, more than $1 per student. The program spread last year to Gunn and St. Francis high schools locally and two schools in Bakersfield.

The program works with qualified non-governmental organizations in the developing world to fund and implement such projects as schools, water wells, irrigation systems, sanitary waste disposal, vaccinations and other simple, low-cost projects. These projects have the potential of dramatically improving the quality of life for millions of people.

This year the non-profit organization, armed with a new Web site geared to making it easy for schools throughout the nation to join the effort, is well on its way to doubling the money raised last year. Freeman said there are 20 schools in various stages of the fundraising effort for this academic school year.

Freeman and several local students, who promoted the campaign, delivered last year's proceeds to the village of Naro Moru in Kenya in April. The $9,000 was enough to construct a 25-by-25-foot classroom for the Kenyan students who had been attending classes in a horse barn. Freeman said the village was transformed by the addition, and many community members provided the labor for the projects.

"It is a moral imperative to support this," Freeman said. "We can mitigate so much suffering for so little. $9,000 goes so far out there."

Los Altos High's fundraiser, held in September this year, raised $2,682, averaging about $1.62 per student.

One Dollar For Life recently received two matching grants from private individuals, which will contribute toward building a women's health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Other projects in planning stages include a school in Mexico, three cows for an orphanage in Kenya, a high school in Nepal and a girls' school in Tanzania.

Freeman said the success of One Dollar For Life depends on getting the word spread to as many high schools as possible.

"It is just so simple and inherently good," he said. "Teens always say they want to do something to change the world – this is the easy way to do it."

For the program to be a success at a high school, Freeman said the school needs at least one dedicated teacher and one dedicated student. He said that once the word spreads about One Dollar For Life, the program will catch on at all high schools as an annual fundraiser.

"I really believe this is going to get to a point where this is going to be a brand name – everyone is going to do ODFL," Freeman said. "Students want to feel they are effective. They have this altruism and they want to believe this world can be better. This is a way to make a better world."

For more information, visit www.odfl.org

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