Mon08032015

News

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk


Courtesy of Microbe World
Colorized low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria

When E. coli and other bacteria were discovered in some Los Altos water last week, officials from the local water supplier, California Water...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

Read more:

Loading...

People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

Read more:

Loading...

Local doctor diagnoses state of U.S. health care

If you want the inside scoop on what's wrong with our current medical system, local author Saul William Seidman, M.D., FACS, is scheduled to share his opinion at Main Street Cafe & Books 6:30-8 p.m. June 14.

Seidman, a retired neurosurgeon, will present evidence from his new book, "Inevitable Incompetence: Soaring Medical Costs, Dangerous Medical Care" (Universal, 2007), a lambasting of the current trend toward health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and socialized medicine.

The doctor knows what he is talking about - his book is based on 25 years' experience as a neurosurgeon, primarily at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. He completed his neurosurgery residency at Yale University.

Seidman's wife, Grace, had a long-term bad experience with Kaiser Permanente, resulting in a successful lawsuit. Her dealings with the hospital provided Seidman with a foundation for the book.

He does more than complain about current trends. Seidman offers suggestions for reversing the prevailing tides and gives tips on improving the chances of receiving good medical care.

About the direction of medicine, Seidman wrote: "We have two choices. We can follow the delusion of 'universal health care' or we can accept a market approach to health care. Putting patients in charge of their medical care is a market approach. It guarantees competence, at least."

Seidman continued: "The corruption of medical care is the result of interference by nonphysicians in the process of patient care. … Bureaucrats now dictate policy. ... I was fortunate to practice neurosurgery in the golden age of medicine. ... Patients had the choice of whom they would trust."

Seidman said that administrators and bureaucrats - so-called medicrats - consume 30 percent of medical expenditures. "Inevitable Incompetence" offers a blistering invective of bureaucrats.

In the book, Seidman said that the most challenging problem with modern medicine is the lack of slow, careful diagnoses. The art and science of clinical diagnoses suffer from the availability of expensive diagnostic tests - doctors tend to order tests rather than take 30 minutes to talk with the patient, record a thorough history and listen to what the patient has to say.

"Today's HMO doctors are expected to limit each visit to six minutes," he wrote.

When Seidman was practicing medicine, he went to the waiting room himself to escort patients to the examination room to observe their gait, an important neurological function. He then spent up to 45 minutes listening to their explanations of what was wrong.

He blames "patient churning" - the policy of getting patients in and out as quickly as possible - for the decline in medical care.

Noting that neurosurgeons are not being adequately replaced - he claims a 33 percent drop in applications - Seidman laments the impersonal nature of current medical practice. He and his colleagues knew each other and spent time together, discussing medicine and getting to know each other's strengths and weaknesses. Within an HMO, he writes, doctors often are unaware of the competency of doctors to whom they refer patients, care is fragmented and a doctor does not take responsibility for a patient's total care.

A section of the book offers suggestions for checking up on your doctor: how to find out if a specialist is board certified, how to evaluate your doctor's skill level, how to find out if your doctor has been involved in disciplinary actions and how to determine the questions a doctor should ask the patient.

"Inevitable Incompetence" is available at Main Street Cafe & Books, 134 Main St., Los Altos. Seidman will sign books at the event. For more information, call 948-8040.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos