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News

City purchases Lincoln Park from county

City purchases Lincoln Park from county


Town Crier File Photo
Lincoln Park, which the city of Los Altos has maintained for more than 50 years, is now officially city property.

The grassy strip along Foothill Expressway known as Lincoln Park now belongs to Los Altos for the price of $1.02 ...

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Schools

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students

Local AAUW gives gift of science to junior high students


Courtesy of Jessica Harell
Blach Intermediate School seventh-grader Paris Harrell, who loves science and animals, recently received a scholarship from the local branch of the AAUW to attend Tech Trek camp.

It’s not every day that a junior hig...

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Community

Friendship blossoms at Fine Art in the Park

Friendship blossoms at Fine Art in the Park

Terenia Offenbacker and Nicolas Bremeau

They first met two years ago at the Rotary Club of Los Altos’ Fine Art in the Park event.

Los Altos Hills resident Terenia Offenbacker is an accomplished painter who studied art education and art ...

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Comment

Attend an event, get involved, have fun: Editorial

You don’t have to run for city council to get involved in the community. Sometimes it can be as simple as attending a Los Altos event. You’ll have plenty of opportunities, as the May and June calendars are bustling with activity.

The Dow...

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Special Sections

Racing around Monterey

Racing around Monterey


Gary Anderson/Special to the Town Crier
The easy handling of the VW Golf R, above, makes for an ideal ride along the Big Sur coast.

 

When automotive journalists are asked to list their favorite places in the world to drive, Monterey alwa...

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Business

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations

'Steampunk' eatery toasts local libations


Courtesy of Eureka
Eureka, a new restaurant in downtown Mountain View, highlights local craft beer and whiskeys on a menu of food spanning from sea to farm.

Craft beer and fancy whiskeys headline the menu at Eureka, the new restaurant that opene...

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People

Stepping Out

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'

PA Players seek escape in 'Into the Woods'


Courtesy of Palo Alto Players
The Baker’s Wife, left, and Cinderella’s erstwhile Prince stand out in the Palo Alto Players production of “Into the Woods.”

Little Red Riding Hood sets forth at the outset of “Into the...

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Spiritual Life

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International

Los Altos United Methodist Church service salutes Heifer International


Courtesy of Los ALtos United Methodist Church
Hidden Villa will bring some of its farm animals to Los Altos United Methodist Church Sunday to support the nonprofit Heifer International.

Los Altos United Methodist Church is scheduled to salute th...

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Local doctor diagnoses state of U.S. health care

If you want the inside scoop on what's wrong with our current medical system, local author Saul William Seidman, M.D., FACS, is scheduled to share his opinion at Main Street Cafe & Books 6:30-8 p.m. June 14.

Seidman, a retired neurosurgeon, will present evidence from his new book, "Inevitable Incompetence: Soaring Medical Costs, Dangerous Medical Care" (Universal, 2007), a lambasting of the current trend toward health maintenance organizations (HMOs) and socialized medicine.

The doctor knows what he is talking about - his book is based on 25 years' experience as a neurosurgeon, primarily at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. He completed his neurosurgery residency at Yale University.

Seidman's wife, Grace, had a long-term bad experience with Kaiser Permanente, resulting in a successful lawsuit. Her dealings with the hospital provided Seidman with a foundation for the book.

He does more than complain about current trends. Seidman offers suggestions for reversing the prevailing tides and gives tips on improving the chances of receiving good medical care.

About the direction of medicine, Seidman wrote: "We have two choices. We can follow the delusion of 'universal health care' or we can accept a market approach to health care. Putting patients in charge of their medical care is a market approach. It guarantees competence, at least."

Seidman continued: "The corruption of medical care is the result of interference by nonphysicians in the process of patient care. … Bureaucrats now dictate policy. ... I was fortunate to practice neurosurgery in the golden age of medicine. ... Patients had the choice of whom they would trust."

Seidman said that administrators and bureaucrats - so-called medicrats - consume 30 percent of medical expenditures. "Inevitable Incompetence" offers a blistering invective of bureaucrats.

In the book, Seidman said that the most challenging problem with modern medicine is the lack of slow, careful diagnoses. The art and science of clinical diagnoses suffer from the availability of expensive diagnostic tests - doctors tend to order tests rather than take 30 minutes to talk with the patient, record a thorough history and listen to what the patient has to say.

"Today's HMO doctors are expected to limit each visit to six minutes," he wrote.

When Seidman was practicing medicine, he went to the waiting room himself to escort patients to the examination room to observe their gait, an important neurological function. He then spent up to 45 minutes listening to their explanations of what was wrong.

He blames "patient churning" - the policy of getting patients in and out as quickly as possible - for the decline in medical care.

Noting that neurosurgeons are not being adequately replaced - he claims a 33 percent drop in applications - Seidman laments the impersonal nature of current medical practice. He and his colleagues knew each other and spent time together, discussing medicine and getting to know each other's strengths and weaknesses. Within an HMO, he writes, doctors often are unaware of the competency of doctors to whom they refer patients, care is fragmented and a doctor does not take responsibility for a patient's total care.

A section of the book offers suggestions for checking up on your doctor: how to find out if a specialist is board certified, how to evaluate your doctor's skill level, how to find out if your doctor has been involved in disciplinary actions and how to determine the questions a doctor should ask the patient.

"Inevitable Incompetence" is available at Main Street Cafe & Books, 134 Main St., Los Altos. Seidman will sign books at the event. For more information, call 948-8040.

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