Tue09232014

News

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates

Meet the Mountain View City Council candidates


Nine candidates have filed to run for three open seats on the Mountain View City Council in the Nov. 4 election – none of them incumbents. The Town Crier asked them to introduce themselves to readers in the following Q&A format. We knew the...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects

LASD committee looks to rank campus improvement projects


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The Los Altos School District’s newly expanded Facilities Advisory Committee met for the first time last week. The 28-member committee’s first task is to prioritize campus improvement projects.

The Los Altos Scho...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Sports

New-look Lancers find their footing

New-look Lancers find their footing


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Jenna Adams, left, and Carly Deale attempt to bump the ball Friday night. The juniors combined for 28 kills.

This year’s St. Francis High girls volleyball team faintly resembles last season’s squad ...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay

MV Whisman teachers cite low pay


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
An estimated 75 supporters of higher teacher pay turned out for the Sept. 4 Mountain View Whisman School District board meeting.

Teachers, trustees and administrators are recovering from a dramatic Mountain View Whism...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho

Skin rejuvenation studio joins Rancho


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Esthetician Marjan Kashi showcases one of the treatment rooms at her new studio, Pure Serenity Skincare at Rancho Shopping Center. Kashi provides services including microdermabrasion and various light and heat energy the...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation

A woman's perspective on the Greatest Generation


During World War II, Virgilia Short Witzel, a young mother and U.S. Navy officer’s wife, grappled on the home front in Menlo Park with wartime rationing, shortages and loneliness. During the ensuing Cold War, she experienced adventure and misadventur...

Read more:

Loading...

People

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

JERALD (JERRY) NELSON CHRISTIANSEN

Resident of San Jose and Los Altos, California

July 21, 1931 to August 4, 2014

Born in Arimo, Idaho, to Jerald Emmett and Rebecca Henderson Nelson Christiansen. Raised in Davis and Riverside, California, with summers in Downey, Idaho, and in Loga...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska

LA photographer spends a night with cranes – and moose – in Alaska


Sandy Powell/Special to the Town Crier
Los Altos resident and bird photographer Sandy Powell recently visited Homer, Alaska, to photograph Sandhill cranes, below. While there, Powell also encountered moose, left.

Los Altos resident Sandy Powell, a...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

Pear puts on a pair of plays

Pear puts on a pair of plays


J. Smith/Special to the Town Crier
Dan Kapler (as Teddy) and Betsy Kruse Craig (Trish) star in Pear Avenue Theatre’s “House.”

The Pear Avenue Theatre production of two interlocking comedies by Alan Ayckbourn – “House&...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Back to Church Sunday offers opportunity to recommit

The children in Los Altos are back to school, and I can still hear parents cheering. Summer is officially over, even if the calendar doesn’t quite think so.

Parents have attended Back to School nights to meet their children’s teachers. B...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living

Los Altos Hills home showcases resort-inspired living


Courtesy of Spectrum Interior Design
In place of a more traditional fireplace, this modern living room features a linear-flame firebox that emits heat while offering a sculpturelike design element.

After traveling the world and visiting a host...

Read more:

Loading...

Long journeys, heat trigger blood-clot warning

For travelers flying the skies on long journeys to distant lands for the vacation of a lifetime, there are more hidden costs than the high price of jet fuel and fees for extra baggage. And those costs are too high.

Nearly 214 million people traveled on domestic airlines last summer, according to the federal Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Anyone sitting in place for an extended period of time is at risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a potentially fatal condition where a blood clot develops in the deep vein(s) of a muscle, most often the legs.

But it's another set of statistics that concerns Dr. Tej Singh, clinical director of the Heart and Vascular Center at El Camino Hospital and director of the Vascular Center at the Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group.

Besides blocking the flow of blood to the immediate area where a clot (thrombus) has formed, the clot or a portion of that clot (emboli) can break off and travel to the lung, blocking the pulmonary artery or its branches, causing a pulmonary embolism. Of the nearly 2 million Americans affected by deep vein thrombosis each year, 600,000 will suffer a pulmonary embolism, according to the American Heart Association, and 10 percent of those will die.

With the summertime heat, proclivity to dehydration and travel plans often resulting in hours of sitting and immobility, Singh sees a marked increase in DVT during the hottest months of the year.

"I see four each month at El Camino and at the (center) 10 to 15," Singh said. "Those are big numbers. These are monthly averages for DVT. (The) numbers do go up slightly during the summer."

Singh said blood clots can cause leg pain and swelling. Other symptoms include tenderness, discoloration or redness. However, warning signs that alert people they have developed clots in their bodies are often absent.

"DVT is silent but deadly," said Linda Anderson, a clinical nurse specialist at the Heart and Vascular Center. "But precautionary steps – and I mean that quite literally – can reduce your risk while traveling. First and foremost, get up and walk around."

This can be a difficult task when a plane's aisle space limits passenger traffic.

"It's a safety issue for the airlines," Singh said. "They need people sitting and not standing up in the aisles."

Long periods of sitting increase the odds of developing deep vein thrombosis because blood flow to the legs is restricted, allowing the blood in stasis to pool and form clots. Often referred to as "economy-class syndrome" because the seats in that section of planes have less leg room and passengers have even less freedom to move about, a Federal Aviation Administration newsletter identifies DVT as a threat to any passenger.

"Recent research, however, has found that passengers in any seating class of the aircraft may develop a DVT," the newsletter reports. "… any situation where one's activity is limited for long periods … may contribute to a DVT. For this reason, the term Traveler's Thrombosis is more appropriate."

Immobility during journeys via train, bus or auto can also trigger clot formation, as can their associated occupations – plane pilots, bus drivers and long-haul truck drivers whose paychecks often depend on the number of miles they drive.

Office workers are at risk, too. A May 9, 2006, article in The Guardian magazine warned those working at computer screens to take frequent breaks. The warning was issued after a computer programmer in England collapsed from e-thrombosis, (different name, same problem) after 12 uninterrupted hours at his workstation. The term e-thrombosis was coined in New Zealand, when a 32-year-old man who sat at his computer for 12 hours daily suffered a pulmonary embolism.

"Walking around allows the leg muscles to squeeze the veins and move blood to the heart," Anderson said. "It's the most important thing you can do to prevent DVT."

But any obvious signs of DVT usually show up well after the plane has landed.

"One reason DVT is so dangerous is because it often goes unrecognized," Singh said. "Travelers who develop the condition might not experience a symptom until they've been home a few days."

A moving clot can trigger chest pain, the symptom of a heart attack or a pulmonary embolism, Singh said.

"A pulmonary embolism also can cause shortness of breath and coughing up blood," he said. "When such symptoms appear, it's important to get to an emergency room quickly and let the doctor know you recently completed a long trip."

Timing is critical.

"Most people who die from a pulmonary embolism do so within 30 to 60 minutes after symptoms start," Singh said.

But immobility isn't the only risk factor in developing clots or embolisms, Singh said.

Trauma to the lower leg, recent surgery or hospitalization are factors that can contribute to developing deep vein thrombosis. Cancer treatments, a family history of clots or a genetic predisposition to DVT alone or in combination aid in the propensity to clot formation.

In his two-and-a-half years in practice at the foundation clinic and the Heart and Vascular Center, Singh has noticed two demographic spikes for embolisms.

Women 25 to 40 with family histories of blood clots, who are taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapies, are at high risk; and anyone 50-70 undergoing cancer therapy, who has had surgery, is inactive and/or dehydrated is in danger, also.

Deep vein thrombosis is usually diagnosed using ultrasound, Singh said. Clots and emboli are normally treated with blood thinners such as Coumaden or Heparin. But Singh urges people to be proactive and prevent DVT and its consequences.

"Stay active, hydrated and know your family history," Singh said. "Perhaps it's worth it to give up the idea of sleeping through that long, boring flight to Europe in order to take steps – and avoid DVT."

Contact Mary Beth Hislop at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos