Thu12182014

News

Council seeks more options for community center

Council seeks more options for community center


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos City Council approved an appropriation to examine options for a new community center to replace the aging Hillview facility.

The Los Altos City Council last week voted narrowly in favor of examining further opti...

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Schools

Local schools participate in  national Hour of Code activities

Local schools participate in national Hour of Code activities


Ellie Van HOutte/Town Crier
Himan Shu Raj, a volunteer from Microsoft, advises Los Altos High ninth-graders, from left, Serhat Suzer, Jamie Bennett and Chris Yang as they participate in the school’s Hour of Code Showcase.

Local schools participa...

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Community

Rotary marks 25th anniversary of AIDS project

Rotary marks 25th anniversary of AIDS project


John Hammerschmidt/Special to the Town Crier
Celebrating the anniversary of the Los Altos Rotary AIDS Project are, from left, front row: Greg Hoblit, Dude Angius, Mary Prochnow and Robin Young. Back: Greg Betts, Joe Renati, Roy Lave, Bob Berka, Dic...

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Sports

Pinewood poised for another title run

Pinewood poised for another title run


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Pinewood’s girls basketball team is receiving contributions from several new players, including freshman Stella Kailahi, above.

Complacency shouldn’t be a problem for the defending Division V state champion Pinewood S...

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Comment

Letters to the Editor

Ticket motorists for U-turns on Main Street

As I was walking downtown on Main Street recently, something came to me out of the blue. The town of Los Altos is missing out on a huge revenue stream. I realized that if all the cars – there were th...

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Special Sections

Looking Ahead

Looking Ahead


s in line to be mayor of Mountain View in 2015.

Mountain View anticipates the following changes in 2015:

• Beginning Jan. 1, Mountain View City Councilmembers will receive a raise to $1,000 per month as a result of the passage of Measure A in...

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Business

Your 2015 stock market game plan

It’s been a maddening month because of oil and gas, especially in stocks and bonds. Then, consumer spending pushed stocks higher Thursday, easing investors’ jitters about the global economy and prompting them to consider how to invest in ...

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Books

Gawande's

Gawande's "Being Mortal" proves an important book on aging


Books about death and dying are usually not on my list of “must reads.”

I couldn’t resist, however, the best-selling “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End” (Metropolitan Books, 2014) by Atul Gawande.

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People

SANGEETA SACHDEVA

SANGEETA SACHDEVA

Sangeeta Sachdeva, 55, wife of Subhash Sachdeva and mother to Natasha and Tanya, died at 8:54pm, Sunday, December 7, 2014 from respiratory failure.

Sangeeta was born on October 18, 1959 in Delhi, India. She was born to Moti Sagar and Raj Kapoor an...

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Travel

South Tahoe renovations enhance off-mountain seasonal fun

As any enthusiast knows well, there is more to the enjoyment of winter sports than skiing or snowboarding.

While many winter resorts make minor upgrades each season, the off-mountain attractions and amenities can be as enticing as the activities on ...

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Stepping Out

Aurora Singers to emit 'Musical Glow' Friday

Aurora Singers to emit 'Musical Glow' Friday


courtesy of Aurora Singers
The Aurora Singers are scheduled to perform a seasonal concert Friday night in Palo Alto.

The Aurora Singers’ “Winter’s Musical Glow” holiday concert is set for 7 p.m. Friday at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Pal...

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Spiritual Life

Enter the superhero: Finding the God who loves you

In my life-coaching practice, I see a lot of pain. Much of it stems from fear and guilt, often expressed as low self-esteem, anxiety, a lack of forgiveness both for oneself and others, anger – and so on.

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Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

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Long journeys, heat trigger blood-clot warning

For travelers flying the skies on long journeys to distant lands for the vacation of a lifetime, there are more hidden costs than the high price of jet fuel and fees for extra baggage. And those costs are too high.

Nearly 214 million people traveled on domestic airlines last summer, according to the federal Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Anyone sitting in place for an extended period of time is at risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a potentially fatal condition where a blood clot develops in the deep vein(s) of a muscle, most often the legs.

But it's another set of statistics that concerns Dr. Tej Singh, clinical director of the Heart and Vascular Center at El Camino Hospital and director of the Vascular Center at the Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group.

Besides blocking the flow of blood to the immediate area where a clot (thrombus) has formed, the clot or a portion of that clot (emboli) can break off and travel to the lung, blocking the pulmonary artery or its branches, causing a pulmonary embolism. Of the nearly 2 million Americans affected by deep vein thrombosis each year, 600,000 will suffer a pulmonary embolism, according to the American Heart Association, and 10 percent of those will die.

With the summertime heat, proclivity to dehydration and travel plans often resulting in hours of sitting and immobility, Singh sees a marked increase in DVT during the hottest months of the year.

"I see four each month at El Camino and at the (center) 10 to 15," Singh said. "Those are big numbers. These are monthly averages for DVT. (The) numbers do go up slightly during the summer."

Singh said blood clots can cause leg pain and swelling. Other symptoms include tenderness, discoloration or redness. However, warning signs that alert people they have developed clots in their bodies are often absent.

"DVT is silent but deadly," said Linda Anderson, a clinical nurse specialist at the Heart and Vascular Center. "But precautionary steps – and I mean that quite literally – can reduce your risk while traveling. First and foremost, get up and walk around."

This can be a difficult task when a plane's aisle space limits passenger traffic.

"It's a safety issue for the airlines," Singh said. "They need people sitting and not standing up in the aisles."

Long periods of sitting increase the odds of developing deep vein thrombosis because blood flow to the legs is restricted, allowing the blood in stasis to pool and form clots. Often referred to as "economy-class syndrome" because the seats in that section of planes have less leg room and passengers have even less freedom to move about, a Federal Aviation Administration newsletter identifies DVT as a threat to any passenger.

"Recent research, however, has found that passengers in any seating class of the aircraft may develop a DVT," the newsletter reports. "… any situation where one's activity is limited for long periods … may contribute to a DVT. For this reason, the term Traveler's Thrombosis is more appropriate."

Immobility during journeys via train, bus or auto can also trigger clot formation, as can their associated occupations – plane pilots, bus drivers and long-haul truck drivers whose paychecks often depend on the number of miles they drive.

Office workers are at risk, too. A May 9, 2006, article in The Guardian magazine warned those working at computer screens to take frequent breaks. The warning was issued after a computer programmer in England collapsed from e-thrombosis, (different name, same problem) after 12 uninterrupted hours at his workstation. The term e-thrombosis was coined in New Zealand, when a 32-year-old man who sat at his computer for 12 hours daily suffered a pulmonary embolism.

"Walking around allows the leg muscles to squeeze the veins and move blood to the heart," Anderson said. "It's the most important thing you can do to prevent DVT."

But any obvious signs of DVT usually show up well after the plane has landed.

"One reason DVT is so dangerous is because it often goes unrecognized," Singh said. "Travelers who develop the condition might not experience a symptom until they've been home a few days."

A moving clot can trigger chest pain, the symptom of a heart attack or a pulmonary embolism, Singh said.

"A pulmonary embolism also can cause shortness of breath and coughing up blood," he said. "When such symptoms appear, it's important to get to an emergency room quickly and let the doctor know you recently completed a long trip."

Timing is critical.

"Most people who die from a pulmonary embolism do so within 30 to 60 minutes after symptoms start," Singh said.

But immobility isn't the only risk factor in developing clots or embolisms, Singh said.

Trauma to the lower leg, recent surgery or hospitalization are factors that can contribute to developing deep vein thrombosis. Cancer treatments, a family history of clots or a genetic predisposition to DVT alone or in combination aid in the propensity to clot formation.

In his two-and-a-half years in practice at the foundation clinic and the Heart and Vascular Center, Singh has noticed two demographic spikes for embolisms.

Women 25 to 40 with family histories of blood clots, who are taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapies, are at high risk; and anyone 50-70 undergoing cancer therapy, who has had surgery, is inactive and/or dehydrated is in danger, also.

Deep vein thrombosis is usually diagnosed using ultrasound, Singh said. Clots and emboli are normally treated with blood thinners such as Coumaden or Heparin. But Singh urges people to be proactive and prevent DVT and its consequences.

"Stay active, hydrated and know your family history," Singh said. "Perhaps it's worth it to give up the idea of sleeping through that long, boring flight to Europe in order to take steps – and avoid DVT."

Contact Mary Beth Hislop at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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