Tue11252014

News

LA council votes to delay community center update

LA council votes to delay community center update


Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
The Los Altos City Council voted to delay adoption of a community center conceptual design plan last week. The plan includes elements from a design charette held earlier this fall, left.

The Los Altos City Council last...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms

Scientists bring experiments into MV classrooms


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
During a Science is Learning geology lesson, Theuerkauf Elementary School students learn about igneous rocks by observing how sugar changes form when heated.

Hundreds of local elementary students perform experiments w...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'

Local actors star in PYT's 'Oklahoma!'


Courtesy of Peninsula Youth Theatre
PYT’s “Oklahoma!” features, from left, David Peters of Mountain View, Jenna Levere of Los Altos and Kai Wessel of Mountain View.

Time is running out to catch Peninsula Youth Theatre’s production of “Oklahoma!”...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Eagles advance

Eagles advance


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High’s Carmen Annevelink, left, and Kristen Liu put up a block against Mountain View. Annevelink totaled 20 kills.

Mountain View High’s out-of-the-gate energy could last for only so long against rival and he...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Coping with addictions: Haugh About That?

Preparing to deal with my lifelong addiction, I stood in front of the mirror ready to confess the shame I’d been hiding. The first step to healing, I reminded myself, is to admit something is wrong.

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One

NASA, Google agreement preserves Hangar One


Bruce Barton/Town Crier
Hangar One, pictured here last January, will be restored under an agreement between Google and NASA.

NASA and Google Inc. forged an agreement last week that allows Google to lease a portion of NASA’s historic Moffett Fede...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

State Street science center closing Nov. 30

State Street science center closing Nov. 30


Ellie Van Houtte/
Helix at 316 State St. is closing after the completion of a one-year grant from Passerelle Investment Co. The science center became a popular destination because of its various exhibits. Town Crier

A popular downtown destination...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree

Children's author signs books at Linden Tree


Author Tiffany Papageorge is scheduled to sign copies of new her book 11 a.m. Dec. 6 at Linden Tree Books, 265 State St., Los Altos.

Papageorge’s “My Yellow Balloon” (Minoan Moon, 2014) is a Mom’s Choice “Gold” winner. In the book, the Los Gat...

Read more:

Loading...

People

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

JAMES WINDELL SMITH

January 11, 1939 – November 6, 2014
Resident of Mountain View

James Windell Smith, a 40 year resident of Los Altos, passed away from complications after a post-surgery stroke November 6th, 2014 in Los Gatos, California.

Born on January 11, 1939 on...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine

Olive Sonoma: There's more to the quaint town than wine


Eren Göknar/ Special to the Town Crier
While many day-trippers may think that Sonoma is all about the grapes, the region boasts other delights. Try a biplane ride over the patchwork landscape.

Sonoma, a scenic two-hour drive from Los Altos, boa...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

LA Stage Company opens 'Fairway'

The Los Altos Stage Company production of Ken Ludwig’s new comedy “The Fox on the Fairway” is slated to run Thursday through Dec. 14 at Bus Barn Theater, 97 Hillview Ave.

A tribute to the English farces of the 1930s and 1940s, “Fox” is a romp that p...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am

Author of Jewish historical novel slated at Congregation Beth Am


The Beth Am Women have scheduled “A Conversation with Author Maggie Anton” 7:30 p.m. Nov. 20 at Congregation Beth Am, 26790 Arastradero Road, Los Altos Hills.

Anton, winner of the 2012 National Jewish Book Award for Fiction, will discu...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years

Christmas At Our House home tour celebrates 26 years


Courtesy of Christopher Stark
Homes on the St. Francis High School Women’s Club’s Christmas at Our House Holiday Home Tour showcase a variety of architectural styles.

The days grow short on sunshine but long on nostalgia as the holidays approach...

Read more:

Loading...

Long journeys, heat trigger blood-clot warning

For travelers flying the skies on long journeys to distant lands for the vacation of a lifetime, there are more hidden costs than the high price of jet fuel and fees for extra baggage. And those costs are too high.

Nearly 214 million people traveled on domestic airlines last summer, according to the federal Bureau of Transportation Statistics. Anyone sitting in place for an extended period of time is at risk for developing deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a potentially fatal condition where a blood clot develops in the deep vein(s) of a muscle, most often the legs.

But it's another set of statistics that concerns Dr. Tej Singh, clinical director of the Heart and Vascular Center at El Camino Hospital and director of the Vascular Center at the Palo Alto Foundation Medical Group.

Besides blocking the flow of blood to the immediate area where a clot (thrombus) has formed, the clot or a portion of that clot (emboli) can break off and travel to the lung, blocking the pulmonary artery or its branches, causing a pulmonary embolism. Of the nearly 2 million Americans affected by deep vein thrombosis each year, 600,000 will suffer a pulmonary embolism, according to the American Heart Association, and 10 percent of those will die.

With the summertime heat, proclivity to dehydration and travel plans often resulting in hours of sitting and immobility, Singh sees a marked increase in DVT during the hottest months of the year.

"I see four each month at El Camino and at the (center) 10 to 15," Singh said. "Those are big numbers. These are monthly averages for DVT. (The) numbers do go up slightly during the summer."

Singh said blood clots can cause leg pain and swelling. Other symptoms include tenderness, discoloration or redness. However, warning signs that alert people they have developed clots in their bodies are often absent.

"DVT is silent but deadly," said Linda Anderson, a clinical nurse specialist at the Heart and Vascular Center. "But precautionary steps – and I mean that quite literally – can reduce your risk while traveling. First and foremost, get up and walk around."

This can be a difficult task when a plane's aisle space limits passenger traffic.

"It's a safety issue for the airlines," Singh said. "They need people sitting and not standing up in the aisles."

Long periods of sitting increase the odds of developing deep vein thrombosis because blood flow to the legs is restricted, allowing the blood in stasis to pool and form clots. Often referred to as "economy-class syndrome" because the seats in that section of planes have less leg room and passengers have even less freedom to move about, a Federal Aviation Administration newsletter identifies DVT as a threat to any passenger.

"Recent research, however, has found that passengers in any seating class of the aircraft may develop a DVT," the newsletter reports. "… any situation where one's activity is limited for long periods … may contribute to a DVT. For this reason, the term Traveler's Thrombosis is more appropriate."

Immobility during journeys via train, bus or auto can also trigger clot formation, as can their associated occupations – plane pilots, bus drivers and long-haul truck drivers whose paychecks often depend on the number of miles they drive.

Office workers are at risk, too. A May 9, 2006, article in The Guardian magazine warned those working at computer screens to take frequent breaks. The warning was issued after a computer programmer in England collapsed from e-thrombosis, (different name, same problem) after 12 uninterrupted hours at his workstation. The term e-thrombosis was coined in New Zealand, when a 32-year-old man who sat at his computer for 12 hours daily suffered a pulmonary embolism.

"Walking around allows the leg muscles to squeeze the veins and move blood to the heart," Anderson said. "It's the most important thing you can do to prevent DVT."

But any obvious signs of DVT usually show up well after the plane has landed.

"One reason DVT is so dangerous is because it often goes unrecognized," Singh said. "Travelers who develop the condition might not experience a symptom until they've been home a few days."

A moving clot can trigger chest pain, the symptom of a heart attack or a pulmonary embolism, Singh said.

"A pulmonary embolism also can cause shortness of breath and coughing up blood," he said. "When such symptoms appear, it's important to get to an emergency room quickly and let the doctor know you recently completed a long trip."

Timing is critical.

"Most people who die from a pulmonary embolism do so within 30 to 60 minutes after symptoms start," Singh said.

But immobility isn't the only risk factor in developing clots or embolisms, Singh said.

Trauma to the lower leg, recent surgery or hospitalization are factors that can contribute to developing deep vein thrombosis. Cancer treatments, a family history of clots or a genetic predisposition to DVT alone or in combination aid in the propensity to clot formation.

In his two-and-a-half years in practice at the foundation clinic and the Heart and Vascular Center, Singh has noticed two demographic spikes for embolisms.

Women 25 to 40 with family histories of blood clots, who are taking birth control pills or hormone replacement therapies, are at high risk; and anyone 50-70 undergoing cancer therapy, who has had surgery, is inactive and/or dehydrated is in danger, also.

Deep vein thrombosis is usually diagnosed using ultrasound, Singh said. Clots and emboli are normally treated with blood thinners such as Coumaden or Heparin. But Singh urges people to be proactive and prevent DVT and its consequences.

"Stay active, hydrated and know your family history," Singh said. "Perhaps it's worth it to give up the idea of sleeping through that long, boring flight to Europe in order to take steps – and avoid DVT."

Contact Mary Beth Hislop at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos