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News

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk

E. coli found in Los Altos water indicated breach, but only low risk


Courtesy of Microbe World
Colorized low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria

When E. coli and other bacteria were discovered in some Los Altos water last week, officials from the local water supplier, California Water...

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Schools

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth

BCS hosts Stretch to Kindergarten program for underserved youth


Traci Newell/Town Crier
The six-week, tuition-free Stretch to Kindergarten program, hosted at Bullis Charter School, serves children who have not attended preschool. A teacher leads children in singing about the parts of a butterfly, above.

Local un...

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Community

Google car painting project calls on artists

Google car painting project calls on artists


Google self-driving car

Already known as an innovator in the tech field, Google Inc. is now moving in on the art world.

The Mountain View-based company July 11 launched the “Paint the Town” contest, a “moving art experiment” that invites Califo...

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Sports

Pedaling with a purpose

Pedaling with a purpose


courtesy of
Rishi Bommannan Rishi Bommannan cycled from Bates College in Maine to his home in Los Altos Hills, taking several selfies along the way. He also raised nearly $13,000 for the Livestrong Foundation, which supports cancer patients.

When R...

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Comment

The truth about coyotes: Other Voices

The Town Crier’s recent article on coyotes venturing down from the foothills in search of sustenance referenced the organization Project Coyote (“Recent coyote attacks keep residents on edge,” July 1). Do not waste your time contac...

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Special Sections

Grant Park senior program made permanent

Grant Park senior program made permanent


Photos by Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Local residents participate in an exercise class at the Grant Park Senior Center, above. Betsy Reeves, below left with Gail Enenstein, lobbied for senior programming in south Los Altos.

It all began when Betsy Reev...

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Business

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered

New State Street rug retailer has downtown Los Altos covered


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Los Altos Rug Gallery owner Fahim Karimi stocks his State Street store with a wall-to-wall array of floor coverings.

A new downtown business owner plans to roll out the red carpet – along with rugs of every other color –...

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Books

Book Signings

• Fritz and Nomi Trapnell have scheduled a book-signing party 4-6 p.m. Aug. 1 at their home, 648 University Ave., Los Altos.

Fritz and his daughter, Dana Tibbitts, co-authored “Harnessing the Sky: Frederick ‘Trap’ Trapnell, ...

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People

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

GRACE WILSON FRANKS

Resident of Los Altos

Grace Wilson Franks, our beloved mother and grandmother, left us peacefully on July 16, 2015 just a few weeks short of her 92nd birthday. She was born to Ross and Florence (Cruzan) Wilson in rural Tulare, California on Septem...

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Travel

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories

Gearing up: Make travel more civilized with accessories


Eren Göknar/Special to the Town Crier
San Francisco-based humangear Inc. sells totes, tubes and tubs for traveling.

In travel, as in romance, it’s the little things that count.

Beyond the glossy brochures lie the travel discomforts too mun...

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Stepping Out

Going out with a 'Bang'

Going out with a 'Bang'


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
“Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” stars, clockwise from top left, Alexander Sanchez, Sophia Sturiale, Deborah Rosengaus and Danny Martin.

Los Altos Stage Company and Los Altos Youth Theatre’s joint production of t...

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Spiritual Life

Build a 'light' house and get out of that dark place

Most of us have a place inside our hearts and minds that occasionally causes us trouble. For some, it is sadness, depression or despair. For others, it may be fear, anger, resentment or myriad other emotional “dark places” that at times seem to hij...

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Magazine

Inside Mountain View

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event

Residents gather at NASA Ames for Pluto Flyby event


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
NASA Ames’ Pluto Flyover event kindles the imaginations of young attendees.

Sue Moore watched the July 20, 1969, moon landing beside patients and staff members of the San Francisco hospital where she worked as a nurse...

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Dishing out healthful choices: Abnormal habits can have serious consequences

Unfortunately, healthful-sounding choices at your favorite restaurant can be nutritional booby traps. We all know that a burger and fries will pack on extra calories and fat, so we survey the menu to find something more healthful.

How about a grilled chicken Caesar salad? Think twice. At Chili's Grill & Bar, the grilled chicken Caesar salad contains a whopping 1,000 calories – approximately half the calories most people should eat in one day. Here's another surprise: at McDonald's, the grilled chicken club sandwich actually has more calories than the Big Mac.

Many diners greatly underestimate the number of calories served at restaurants. The New York City Health Department surveyed 7,000 chain-restaurant customers and found they underestimated the amount of calories they consumed by an average of 600 calories per meal. With most restaurant meals averaging 800 calories, making good choices while eating out can be tricky.

Here are some tips to guide you to more healthful restaurant dining.

• Arm yourself with knowledge before you order. Check out the restaurant's Web site for the nutritional breakdown of its menu. Pull up nutrition information using the Web site www.healthydiningfinder.com. Make an informed choice before leaving home.

• Do not arrive feeling too hungry. Have a small snack, like an apple, before going to the restaurant.

• While waiting for your meal, have the breadbasket or chips and salsa removed from your table. It is too tempting to fill up on empty calories before your meal arrives. Eating just 10 tortilla chips before your meal can add 150 calories to your intake.

• Do not be shy about asking exactly how the food is prepared. Marinades and sauces can add fat and calories to an otherwise healthful grilled dish. Order baked, grilled or roasted dishes and ask for the sauces to be served on the side.

• Avoid anything fried. Although most chain restaurants have vowed to phase out hydrogenated oils, their convenience and stability at high heat make them irresistible. A small bag of french fries at McDonald's (the size that comes in children's meals) contains 8 grams of the artery-clogging trans fat. The USDA urges people to limit trans fat to 2 grams per day.

• Request double vegetables. Vegetables average 25 calories a serving, making them a nutritional bargain. Filling up on the veggies (hold the butter) instead of the high-calorie main dish is a great way to save calories.

• Entree portions at most restaurants are enough for two meals. Share an entree with a friend and order an extra salad or save half and take home for another meal. Another idea is to order an appetizer and a salad instead of an entree.

• Eat slowly. It takes 20 minutes for our stomachs to communicate with our heads to tell us we are full.

• Hold the cheese on hamburgers and sandwiches and save approximately 100 calories. Hold the bacon on sandwiches and save 120 calories.

• Share a dessert with a friend.

• Be cautious of adding liquid calories when dining out. Beverages can add hundreds of hidden calories to your meal. A nondiet soda can add 150-400 calories, and a glass of wine will add another 125 calories.

• De-emphasize the food. Focus on the conversation and being out with friends. Enjoy the break from cooking and cleaning dishes. If you wouldn't gobble down a 20-ounce steak at home, don't stop being smart about nutrition when you walk out the front door.

Kim Verity, M.A., M.S., earned a degree in human nutrition science from Cornell University. She lives in Los Altos and works as nutrition educator for the Palo Alto YMCA. For more information, e-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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