Wed10012014

News

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics

LA Council race adds 3 new faces to city politics


The Town Crier chronicled the first election of Los Altos City Council incumbent Jarrett Fishpaw in 2010 and documented the Los Altos candidacy of Jean Mordo, who volunteered as a longtime public servant in Los Altos Hills before moving to the flat...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system

St. Simon launches web-based learning management system


Courtesy of St. Simon Parish School
St. Simon fifth-grader Matthew Cummins uses a laptop in class last week. The school’s cloud-based Schoology system boosts organization and collaboration.

Families at St. Simon Parish School in Los Altos laun...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'

Los Altos to celebrate 100 years of library use with 'Centennial Faire'


Town Crier File Photo
The Los Altos main library is among the more popular branches in the county library district system, set to celebrate 100 years.

In 1914, Babe Ruth made his debut with the Boston Red Sox, wages hit $5 per day, the first ste...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Eagles eye another stellar season

Eagles eye another stellar season


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Los Altos High outside hitter Carmen Annevelink, right, goes for the kill Thursday against Palo Alto, as teammates Sarah Tritschler, left, and Lulu Kishton prepare to play defense. The Eagles won the match in straight ga...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Torok, Walter, Dave for MVLA board: Editorial

There’s really nothing major you can criticize about the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District. It offers a diverse array of effective programs for all types of students. Its instructors, with few exceptions, are outstanding.

Howe...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

'Funabout' Fiat

'Funabout' Fiat


Photos courtesy of Fiat
The 2014 Fiat 500e uses 29 kilowatt-hours per 100 miles, which the engineers claim is the equivalent of 116 mpg of gas use. It has a sticker price of $33,095.

If you believe in climate change, would love to see alternat...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground

App developer eyes First Friday as testing ground


Ted Fagenson

An East Bay app developer is testing his newest creation in downtown Los Altos.

Ted Fagenson, co-founder of Skrownge (pronounced “scrounge”), told the Town Crier that he’s beta testing his mobile gaming app this week ...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween

From story to bookstore: Local journey highlights Halloween


Courtesy of Dee Ellmann
Jenny Hurwick self-published her picture book last month after decades of storytelling.

During her years working as a teacher and a Los Altos mom, Jenny Hurwick loved to tell stories. One tale she crafted for her son just se...

Read more:

Loading...

People

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

VINCENT (TIM) MURPHY JR.

July 27, 1953 – August 12, 2014

Native Los Altan died Medford, OR. Graduated Bellarmine Prep. Married Josephine Domino, 1950. Licensed Auto Mechanic, Private Pilot, skilled Computer Scientist. Tim “could fix anything”. Afflicted with cancer 2001. ...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup

Taking a Turkey trek: Winging it during the World Cup


Rich Robertson/Special to the Town Crier
The sun sets over the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey, left.

Tours that whisk you from Istanbul to Bodrum in 11 days are as plentiful as souvenir hawkers in Turkey, but traveling from the Blue Mosque to Topkapi ...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

'Gypsy' on its way out

'Gypsy' on its way out


Chris Berger/Special to the Town Crier
Alison Koch of Los Altos plays Dainty June in “Gypsy.”

This is the final weekend to catch the Sunnyvale Community Players production of “Gypsy” at the Sunnyvale Theatre. The musical is slated to close Sund...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry

Ugandan pastor visits U.S. to raise support for children's ministry


Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Herman Lukwago educates children in Uganda.

Imagine life if your father had 25 children and you were raised in poverty in rural Uganda.

Now imagine that you and your siblings were orphaned at an early age and you ass...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Local events add color to autumn calendar

Local events add color to autumn calendar


Van Houtte/town crier Visitors make their way through the Children’s Alley.

As Los Altos’ signature Chinese Pistache trees exchange their summer green for vibrant hues of yellow, orange and red in the fall, an abundance of local events also ad...

Read more:

Loading...

Impacts of a festival

Festival gives downtown Los Altos the ultimate exposure

There are many who believe the downtown Los Altos Arts and Wine festival is one of the top family festivals on the peninsula. The festival includes children's programs, music and entertainment that other art and wine festivals don't begin to utilize.

When there are 500 hard working volunteers promoting a friendly family atmosphere, it's easy to understand why an estimated 100,000 people will visit the booths of 385 artists in the downtown area for the two-day festival.

Sixteen years ago, Marion Jackston, known by some as the matriarch of downtown Los Altos, convinced the downtown Los Altos Village Association (LAVA) to start a festival type "garage sale." After seeing how successful the Festival of Lights Parade became in 1977, she suggested the association sponsor the downtown Los Altos Arts and Wine Festival in the South Parking Plaza.

The festival wasn't heartily received by some merchants, but Jackston addressed concerns by talking to opponents individually. As she envisioned, the Los Altos Arts and Wine Festival, which began in 1980, turned out to be the greatest fund-raiser imaginable for the association.

The festival provides the "seed money" for other events. LAVA organizers use festival proceeds to fund and promote the annual Festival of Lights Parade, a Halloween window painting contest, concerts in the Community Plaza, a downtown Easter Egg Hunt, high school scholarships and other activities.

Jane Reed, former executive director of LAVA, said the festival began as a fund-raiser for other events and has met the goal each year.

"The festival has progressed into a family get-together where you see people you haven't seen for a long time. We tried to bill this as a greeting place for families."

At the same time, the festival is also a great fund-raiser for service clubs and non-profit organizations that operate festival booths.

Sandy Grisedale, executive director of LAVA, also touts the benefits of the Arts and Wine Festival.

"It's prestige for Los Altos," she said. "Visitors see what we have to offer in downtown Los Altos and they come back time and time again to shop. Each year we have co-sponsors who want to be associated with the festival. These organizations are so supportive of the festival that they want to come back each year."

LAVA president Kent Nelson said the festival is the envy of other communities. "Because of our Arts and Wine Festival, LAVA is looked upon in the Bay Area as the premium example of a downtown merchant and professional organization," he said. "Everyone wishes they could emulate our vision, vitality and merchant dedication. The physical attributes from the lamp posts to the hanging banners are examples of benefits from the festival."

Norm Chu, owner of Baskin-Robbins on State Street, said not all merchants are happy with the festival because it takes away some of their Saturday business and it takes up all the parking places.

"I'm on the board of directors of LAVA and a lot of merchants don't understand that the festival covers all the expenses for the year," he said. "I'm for it 110 percent, because its a great opportunity to showcase downtown as well as the services other towns don't have."

Ron Shanholtz, owner of Mac's Tea Room on Main Street, has mixed feelings over the benefits of the festival.

"The biggest negative is the festival closes down Main and State Streets for two days," he said. "Most of the people come from out of town and regular customers don't shop because of a lack of parking spaces. But I do a good day's business without my regular customers. The bar does great and the restaurant does well for the two days."

"The festival generates more walk-in traffic than any other event," said William Puccetti, owner of Design and Interiors on State Street. "We are open both days and we make good sales each day. I have talked to other merchants explaining how important it is to stay open on Sunday just to get the exposure."

Dennis Ronberg, owner of Linden Tree Children's Records and Books on State Street, first organized a children's stage for the festival, an element that keeps expanding with each passing year.

"The benefits of the Arts and Wine festival have helped Los Altos become a unique city by developing the atmosphere of a family community," Ronberg said. "Having the children's stage adds another dimension that other festivals don't have. The children's program is a quality event other festivals don't try to follow. It brings in a lot of families from out of town.

"My business on the days of the festival are not that great, but the festival allows parents to discover our store and they return later to browse and purchase."

Service clubs also benefit from the festival, as the Sertoma, Rotary and Kiwanis clubs will attest.

Sandy Pakaski, president of Sertoma Club, will work in a barbecue food booth as Sertoma participates in its fifth year at the festival. Sertoma profits will support the Olde Town Band, the Community Health Awareness Council (CHAC), the Community Services Agency (CSA) and School for the Deaf.

The festival is the second biggest fund-raiser for the Kiwanis Club. Kiwanis president Elizabeth Cleary said their profits help provide projects to senior groups in Los Altos, scholarships and contributions to CSA.

Noreen Sorg of the Los Altos Police Department cited only one arrest at the festival the past two years, indicating crowds attending recent festivals have been well-behaved.

"I want to stress that we've never had a problem," Grisedale said. "We've been lucky in that we've had great crowds." She said three police officers will be patrolling festival grounds each day.

Festival clean-up, in the hands of Los Altos Garbage Company employees, also has been handled well, organizers say.

"Street trash cans will be emptied before, during and after the weekend," Nelson said. "City crews have been planting additional flowers and plants and tidying up. They will sweep and clean up Monday morning (July 10) by 6 a.m." He said 20 rest rooms and four handicapped facilities will be provided during the festival.

"By the time they're done (maintenance crews), it's like the festival didn't even happen," Grisedale said.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos